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Fitness Tip#235 - October 26, 2012

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Slow Cardio

A lot of people turn to slow cardio exercise when they start their weight-loss journeys. It seems like a good idea at first because slow cardio burns a higher percentage of calories from fat than higher-intensity cardio. However, Rachel Cosgrove, owner of Results Fitness and author of the best-selling book, "The Female Body Breakthrough," warns against slow cardio. "The problem with steady-state cardio is that your body adapts and becomes extremely efficient, meaning you burn less and less calories for the same work done," said Cosgrove. "If you jog a mile today, you might burn 100 calories. Jog the same mile tomorrow, and you'll only burn 80 calories and so on."

To get back on track, begin interval training to burn more fat and prevent your body from becoming too calorically efficient during your workouts. At its simplest level, interval training consists of bouts of rigorous exercise followed by periods of rest. Compared to slow cardio, interval training doesn't burn a higher percentage of calories from fat, but it burns more total calories -- and you'll continue to burn extra calories for the next 38 hours. With slow cardio, you stop burning extra calories when your heart rate goes back to normal. Put interval training to work for you by adding a simple routine to the end of your weight-training session: Start with a five-minute warm-up, then exercise as fast as you can for one minute, followed by a rest period at a slow/moderate pace for two minutes. Repeat this three-minute interval three to four times; finish off your workout with a five-minute cool-down.


Have a great weekend!
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GRACEISENUF 10/27/2012 7:39PM

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ALFA_SUNSHINE 10/27/2012 4:29PM

    emoticon Bring it! emoticon play!

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Fitness Tip#234 - October 25, 2012

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Dog Walkers Burn Extra Calories


In addition to being cuddly and loveable, dogs motivate their owners to lead active lifestyles. Unlike a human walking partner, dogs want to go for a stroll every day of the year and will even remind you when you get home that it’s time to go outside. But the physical benefits of owning a dog do not stop there. Staying active requires a mental commitment, and dog walkers are more likely to find the motivation to do other physical activities like sports or gardening.


A new study led by a Michigan State University researcher shows that people who own and walk their dogs are 34% more likely to meet the federal benchmark of 150 minutes of leisure-time physical activity. When it comes to exercise, once you get going, you’ll want to keep going, and having a fluffy friend is often the kick start that people need to get moving.


Does your dog motivate you to walk more frequently? Did you know on average people who own and walk dogs are healthier than those who do not?


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LIV2RIDE 10/26/2012 9:28AM

    too bad I can't walk my cat. LOL

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NYKIMMIE 10/26/2012 7:19AM

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Fitness Tip#233 - October 24, 2012

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

6 Simple Steps for Getting in Your Daily Walks


Finding the motivation to walk everyday can be difficult. Follow these simple steps to help you get into a routine:


1) Map it Out – Visualize your walk before you head out. That way you have a predetermined route that you can easily follow to meet your goals.


2) Set Goals – Wear a pedometer and keep track of your progress. 10,000 is the recommended amount of steps per day.


3) Lay Out Your Gear – Put your walking gear (clothing, shoes, socks, water bottle, music, etc.,) out the night before. When you see them the next day it will put you in the right frame of mind and make it easier for you to get your walk in.


4) Explore – Break the monotony and try walking in different parts of your city.


5) Multi-task – One great thing about walking is that you can do it while checking other things off of your to-do list. Listen to an audiobook or album, walk the dog, or call a friend and catch up while you stroll.


6) Socialize – Walk with a friend or co-worker to help yourself stay motivated. If you’re interested in joining other walkers, find a Walk with Walgreens walking group in your area.

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GOLFINSUNSHINE 10/24/2012 5:49PM

    like all of your suggestions... thank-you

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Fitness Tip#232 - October 23, 2012

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

3 Approaches To Improving Your Fitness And Reaching Your Goals (4 of 4)

The Combo Platter
Many people prefer cardio training that combines the two other methods, opting for a mixture of endurance training and high-intensity workouts.

Soccer, lacrosse, hockey and even MMA athletes are likely to adopt this type of regimen. These athletes require strength for violent bursts of energy, but they also need stamina to compete at lower intensities for longer periods of time.

Combining endurance and high-intensity training is a great way to build variety into a training regimen, which can eliminate workout boredom. Your Monday workout might be sprints at the track followed by intense weightlifting; on Tuesday, you can hit the pool for 30 minutes of swimming laps. A week might look like this:

Monday – Full Body Strength Training

Tuesday – sprints and bike intervals

Wednesday – rest

Thursday – Full Body Strength Training followed by sled pushes

Friday – rest

Saturday 2-3 mile run

Sunday – 60 minutes of brisk walking

What’s The Best Method?
Every workout approach has benefits and drawbacks, and there’s no one perfect way to get in shape. Some people are genetically geared to be endurance athletes; others are predisposed to strength sports – and we all tend to gravitate to the activities that come naturally to us.

So the next time someone says a certain type of cardio is “the best” for you, remember that your temperament and fitness objectives – not necessarily what someone else recommends – should determine what workout is best. Assess your fitness goals and whether the routine is one you would actually enjoy doing long term. Your answers will help you determine which cardio plan is best for you.


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GRACEISENUF 10/24/2012 12:32AM

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NEWANDHEALTHY13 10/24/2012 12:24AM

  Thank you for the informative post.

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Fitness Tip#231 - October 22, 2012

Monday, October 22, 2012

3 Approaches To Improving Your Fitness And Reaching Your Goals (3 of 4)


High-Intensity Interval Training
Athletes who play sports with short periods of intense activity, such as football, baseball or short-distance track events (sprinting, pole vault, high jump and long jump), are better served with cardio routines built around high-intensity interval training.

For these athletes, strength and power are essential; the ability to run five miles at a time isn’t. So workouts should incorporate repeated periods of intense work followed by longer periods of rest, much like they would experience playing their sports. Their training might emphasize 40-yard dashes and activities that force them to quickly change direction and movement patterns.

Even if you’re not an elite athlete, high-intensity cardio training can help improve your strength and speed, and build your physique. But keep in mind that too much intense training without enough rest can actually slow your progress. A good rule of thumb is to limit high intensity training to 3-4 days per week, especially for those just starting out.

Keep in mind that weight training is considering high intensity training, so if you’re already lifting three times per week, you have one day left for conditioning via high intensity cardio training. Or if you wanted to get some additional cardio while still lifting thrice weekly, you could add a sprint session to your lower body weight training day, and then have a separate day where you push the sled, flip a tire, and do various conditioning drills.


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LIV2RIDE 10/23/2012 6:54AM

    I love HIIT workouts. I think that's why I loved Insanity so much.

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