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Fitness Tip# 29 - January 16, 2012

Monday, January 16, 2012

How much exercise should I do?

In addition to the National Academies' Institute of Medicine's recommendation of 60 minutes of daily exercise to prevent weight gain, there are two other major U.S. guidelines for how much physical activity you need:

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends a five- to 10-minute warm-up and then 30 to 45 minutes of continuous aerobic activity (such as swimming, biking, walking, dancing, or jogging) three to five times a week, with a stretch and cool down period in the last five to 10 minutes. The ACSM also recommends weight training: at least one set (eight to 12 repetitions) each of eight to 10 different exercises, targeting the body's major muscle groups.

The surgeon general recommends accumulating 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity (hard enough to leave you feeling "warm and slightly out of breath") on most, if not all, days of the week. You can do it in two bouts of 15 minutes, three bouts of 10 minutes, or one bout of 30 minutes. This recommendation emphasizes incorporating activity into your daily life -- walking instead of taking the bus, parking your car farther from the mall and walking across the parking lot, taking stairs instead of the elevator, and washing your car by hand.

If your ready to "BRING IT", then you will "BRING IT" for 60min - 90min at 110%!!!!!!!!!!!

"BRING IT"
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

GRACEISENUF 1/16/2012 3:41PM

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Fitness Tip# 28 - Friday 13, 2012

Friday, January 13, 2012

Should I hold off on weight training until I lose weight?

Absolutely not. Lifting weights will not only help you lose weight, but maintain the loss. Here's why:

Muscle keeps your metabolism revved up, burning calories, fat, and glucose (sugar).

When you lose weight, up to 25% of the loss may come from muscle, resulting in a slower metabolism. Weight lifting will help preserve or rebuild any muscle you lose by dieting.

Muscle helps you with aerobic exercise. The stronger you are, the better you will be at any aerobic activity.

Weight training improves your body's muscle-to-fat ratio (you end up with less body fat and more muscle), which improves both your health and your fitness level.

Gaining muscle will help you look better as you define and tone your physique.

Building strength helps you feel good about yourself. Although the scale may show a slight weight gain when you start lifting weights (usually five pounds or less), you probably won't look heavier because the gain is in muscle, and your clothes may even fit more loosely.

HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND!

"BRING IT"
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

LIV2RIDE 1/14/2012 7:40AM

    I found that when I was on a program that focused on cardio (TurboFire) I really missed strength training. And when I was on a program that focused on strength training (P90X) I really missed cardio. I'm doing the hybrid now and like it a lot. I only have 4 weeks left. After that I'm going to make my own schedule using P90X, my brand new elliptical and my bike on the trainer. I really enjoy the P90X workouts and the variety they provide. Strength training makes me feel so powerful and alive. emoticon

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Fitness Tip# 27 - Thursday 12, 2012

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Why do you use the BMI, and is it useful for weight lifters?
The Body Mass Index (BMI) is a simple way for men and women to estimate body fat based on their height and weight. From the BMI, it is possible to determine your healthy weight range.
One of the limitations of BMI is that it can overpredict overweight or obesity in people who are lean and muscular. For instance, someone who is 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs 220 pounds, with 12% body fat, would be considered obese based on BMI standards. Obviously, someone with 12% body fat is not obese.
The scientists who developed the BMI guidelines readily admit to this limitation. But their rationale is that most Americans are not lean and muscular and so for most people, the BMI is an accurate assessment of body fat and increased health risk.
It is important to know that people who are classified as overweight or obese can still be healthy as long as they are fit. In one well-known study, fit people with BMIs that classified them as overweight or obese were healthier and lived longer than unfit people who were at normal weight.
The BMI, for the majority of Americans, is the most up-to-date and scientifically sound method available for determining healthy weight.


"BRING IT"
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

PURZHINKITTI 1/16/2012 10:59AM

    Thanks for posting these fitness tip blogs

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Fitness Tip# 26 - Wednesday 11, 2012

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Signs someone is trying to rip you off:

Extravagant claims of massive improvement in a short period of time with little or no effort. If it sounds too good to be true, guess what? It is.

Claims of secret or suppressed knowledge that "the [diet/fitness/medical/exercise] establishment" doesn't want you to know about. Claims that all well-established forms of exercise like running and lifting weights are wrong.

Claims about spot reduction or converting fat to muscle, both of which are impossible. Losing fat and gaining muscle are possible, but you don't literally turn one into the other.

Use of meaningless language like "toning" or "sculpting" instead of talking about quantifiable changes to body composition, strength or endurance.

Magical language. Your personal spirituality is beyond the scope of this guide, but appeals to vaguely defined concepts like "energy fields" that are never actually explained and "internal cleansing" of various "toxins" that always remain nameless are usually strong indicators that someone is trying to con you.

Overuse of scientific-sounding language that is never actually defined. Real programs may have some jargon in them, but they will explain what the jargon means. At worst, you'll be able to easily find the meaning of their terminology, because they're using real concepts with a real scientific basis. Con artists just tend to throw lots of big words at you in the hope that you just give up and assume that they're smarter than you are, and you can never find out what they actually mean, because they just made it up to sell you something.

"BRING IT"
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Fitness Tip# 25 - Tuesday 10, 2012

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Progress beyond poundage
The thing about your weight is that it doesn't tell you what you're made of, just how much of you there is. The name of the game is losing fat, not muscle, so what happens if fat goes down and weight stays the same or goes up? You made up the difference in lean mass, of course. You shrink in areas that were full of fat, because muscle is more dense than fat. People on good programs often see larger changes in clothing sizes that their weight change would suggest. This is a good thing, because your real progress in terms of appearance is better than the scale is telling you.
The best way to track your overall progress appearance-wise is by measuring yourself with a tape measure in areas you want to get bigger or smaller, and by taking pictures of yourself at regular intervals. This way you can see how your body composition is changing for the better.

"BRING IT"
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