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eat RABBIT

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Wild rabbit meat, which is leaner and tastier than the farmed variety, has a fabulous subtle, gamey flavour (very different from richly flavoured hare). It is available throughout the year but you're more likely to find the best sized rabbits from July to December.


BIOLOGY

The rabbit is a member of the family Leporidae, which includes the hare. Rabbits are gregarious and nocturnal animals that feed on grasses and herbaceous plants but will also eat bark when grass is not available. Rabbits are highly efficient at converting plant proteins into animal proteins (their conversion rate is double that of cattle, for example).

NUTRITION

Rabbit meat is relatively low in fat and high in protein. It is a good source of niacin, iron, phosphorus, and vitamin B12.

TIPS

BUYING
Unlike much of Europe, rabbit is rarely seen in UK supermarkets, but is available from many butchers and food markets. It is also available by mail order from a number of suppliers, such as Graig Farm Organics or Alternative Meats.

Select rabbits by size; they should be large enough to yield a decent amount of meat, but not too large. Wild rabbits much larger than 1kg are prone to be tough. Younger, smaller animals will be more tender and better suited to quick cook methods such as roasting or barbecuing. Larger, older rabbits will have more flavour but may be less tender and so better suited to slower cooking.

STORING
Fresh rabbit will keep in the fridge for several days (or longer if vacuum packed). Freezing is not recommended as this can make the meat too dry.

PREPARING
To joint a rabbit: cut the hind quarters away from the body and separate the legs. Halve the leg joints. Cut the body (saddle) horizontally through the backbone into two or three portions, stopping at the rib cage. Cut lengthways through the breastbone and divide the ribcage section in half.

As rabbit meat is very lean, care should be taken to prevent it from drying out during cooking. Marinading or barding (covering in a fat or wrapping in bacon) can help moisten the flesh during roasting or barbecuing.

RECIPE

http://uktv.co.uk/food/recipe/aid/515120

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

TWOOFTHREE 7/19/2010 10:04AM

  My grandfather used to raise rabbits too. Used to kill them with his bare hands.

I still can't look at rabbits and not see food. To me they're not pets at all.

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BRIGITTE20 7/16/2010 10:33PM

    My grandparents raised rabbits on their farm in Normandy (France). My mother as well but I had to kill and gut them as she could not do it herself. I love the meat but now that I live in Canada it's not as easily available in supermarkets over here plus my kids only see the cute bunnies not the very healthy protein source they are... emoticon

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TWOOFTHREE 7/14/2010 5:51AM

  I haven't had rabbit for many years now. But I'm going to go to my butcher's this weekend and buy one.

Then I'm going to slow cook it . . .

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ROX525 7/14/2010 5:44AM

    I don't know if I want to try rabbit, however, I do get angry when they get into the garden. Thank you for the nutritional info. and recipe in case I want to try it. Have a great day. P.S. I couldn't eat horse either.

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PTCAKES 7/14/2010 5:38AM

    We used to eat rabbit, but it became very expensive in our local stores. Of course, we have several living in our garden, the the children have named them...

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Eat RASPBERRIES

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Vividly pink, exquisitely perfumed and very delicate, fresh raspberries are a real summertime treat.

Raspberries never fail to please when served with just a dusting of icing sugar and a lick of cream. A fresh raspberry sauce, made by pushing raspberries through a sieve and stirring in some sifted icing sugar, makes a wonderful addition to vanilla ice cream, apple juice, champagne, yoghurt, strawberries, cocktails, chocolate mousse, toast...


NUTRITION

Raspberries are high in fibre, iron, potassium and vitamins A and C. They also contain phytochemicals including beta-carotene (helps fight against heart disease) and ellagic acid (linked with reducing the risk of cancer).

TIPS

BUYING
Raspberries should be plump and dry, with a good shape and uniform colour. Avoid berries with their hulls intact as they will be under-ripe and tart.

STORING
Due to their hollow core raspberries are fragile and so should be handled with care. They are also highly perishable; remove any mushy raspberries before refrigerating and eat within a day or two. They do freeze very well: spread a single layer on a tray and freeze until solid before transferring to single portion freezer bags to be enjoyed over the winter.

PREPARING
Raspberries are prone to becoming damaged and mis-shapen if wet. If you're going to be serving raspberries whole your best bet is to not wash them.

OTHER STUFF

On July 11th each year, the tiny village of Concèze in France holds a Fête de la Framboise (Raspberry Festival). More than 6,000 people go along to meet producers, sample dishes such as peach melba or duck cooked in raspberry vinegar, and witness the creation of a giant raspberry tart.

RECIPE

http://www.ivillage.co.uk/food/fruitveg/
fruit/articles/0,10103,164302_176827-5
,00.html

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

BRIGITTE20 7/16/2010 10:30PM

    I was born in France so I know what to do next I visit July 11th! I love raspberries and we can never keep a container more than a few hours in our home! Thanks for sharing. emoticon

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Eat Mackerel

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

The mackerel isn't a delicately flavoured fish and its richness doesn't always lend itself well to a simple 'lemon and herbs' pairing. But given the right treatment (see PICK OF THE RECIPES) it is a fantastically moist, flavoursome fish that makes an inexpensive and very healthy meal.

NUTRITION

Health experts recommend eating at least one serving of oily fish, such as mackerel, each week. Mackerel is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, and vitamin B12.
TIPS

BUYING
Look for mackerel with shiny bodies and bright eyes. They should be firm-feeling and rigid; fresh mackerel won't droop if held horizontally by the head. The freshest specimens are likely to be found in good fishmongers or markets. After buying mackerel be sure to keep it cool until you get home.

STORING
Oily fish spoil faster than white fish and mackerel is best eaten on the day of purchase or within 24 hours if kept chilled. It can also be frozen successfully.

PREPARING
Ask your fishmonger to gut the fish. At home, wash under cold running water and pat dry before cooking. Baking, grilling, barbecuing, or pan-frying are excellent cooking methods. To check if mackerel is cooked, slit the fish at the thickest part with a small knife: the flesh should appear just opaque but still moist.

Due to mackerel's richness, cream or butter-based sauces are best avoided. A spicy treatment works well, as does matching with something sharp. Gooseberry or rhubarb sauces are traditional accompaniments, or try experimenting with citrus flavours such as ortanique or pomelo.

RECIPE

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/
food-and-drink/recipes/grilled-mackere
l-with-tomato-and-fennel-salad-555618.html

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

BRIGITTE20 7/11/2010 3:42PM

    Hi girlfriend! Thanks for the tips and recipe... Love fish, I try to eat some once a day but it's so difficult to get fresh fish over here. Most of fish product are frozen and/or processed! Have a great week! emoticon

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Eat courgettes (zucchini)

Monday, June 14, 2010

Courgettes (known as zucchini to Italians and Americans) are beautifully tender vegetables with a fresh, delicate flavour.

NUTRITION

Courgettes have a high water content and are low in calories. They are a source of folate, potassium, and vitamins A and C.

TIPS

BUYING
Smaller, younger courgettes have more flavour. Look for firm, heavy-feeling courgettes with unblemished bright and glossy skins.

STORING
Up to 5 days in a fridge.

PREPARING
Wash well and trim both ends. The courgette is a versatile ingredient and can be baked, fried, steamed or stewed according to recipe.

OTHER STUFF

Courgette flowers can often be found on the menus of French or Italian restaurants. Smaller flowers are given a tempura treatment (fried in a light batter); larger flowers are typically stuffed with tomatoes and herbs or goat's cheese.

RECIPE

http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/courg
ette-and-potato-cakes-with-mint-and-fe
ta-cheese,1454,RC.html

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

THEGORGESBLONDE 6/14/2010 10:21AM

    I love these!

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Eat aubergines (eggplant)

Wednesday, June 02, 2010

The aubergine's subtle and distinctive combination of textures and flavours - smooth, fleshy, creamy, smoky - make it a versatile and beguiling component of many great dishes.

NUTRITION

Aubergines are a good source of fibre and folic acid. The colour of the skin is a result of the presence of anthocyanins - compounds with antioxidant properties.
TIPS

BUYING
Choose aubergines that feel heavy with smooth, taut, unblemished skin and fresh-looking unwithered green stalks.

STORING
Aubergines are easily damaged; handle with care. They keep in the fridge for a few days.

PREPARING
In the past it was normal to salt aubergines to remove bitterness and moisture. Modern aubergines are rarely too bitter, but salting can help reduce the amount of oil aubergines absorb during cooking. Cut the aubergine into thick slices, salt well and stand in a colander for around half an hour to allow the juices to drain away. Rinse thoroughly and dry with a kitchen towel.

Roasting, griddling and frying (with a good batter to reduce the amount of oil absorbed) are all suitable cooking methods.

RECIPE
Imam bayildi - http://www.cypnet.co.uk/ncyprus/culture/cu
isine/veg/imam.html

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

BRIGITTE20 6/14/2010 8:56AM

    I love aubergines, especially in ratatouille or dried in the oven! They make a chewy, nearly calorie free snack this way. Thanks for sharing. emoticon

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TWOOFTHREE 6/2/2010 6:55AM

  I kinda like them. But I've had mixed results when I've tried to cook them myself.

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JOHNWBROCKSR777 6/2/2010 6:43AM

    I love Aubergines...

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