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Joining a Mountain Bike Club and Building Trails

Friday, April 20, 2012

Part 1: Joining the International Mountain Bike Association

As my interest in Mountain Biking has grown, I decided it was time to join a club full of people as crazy as me. First I joined the International Mountain Bike Association, then I joined the local chapter of the IMBA, called the Colorado Mountain Bike Association or COMBA for short.



The total for joining both clubs was $50. As a bonus I get a pair of biking socks and a subscription to Dirt Rag magazine. I also plan to start mountain bike racing and the COMBA are the people that put on most of the events in the area.

Part 2: I am a Joiner

My wife thinks my tendency to join clubs and associations is a serious personality flaw. I currently belong to the following:

Colorado Football Officials Association
Denver Football Officials Association
International Plastic Modelers' Society (Scale Models)
Academy of Model Aeronautics (RC Planes)
Founding Member of the GTO Association of America (Muscle Cars)
International Mountain Bike Association
Colorado Mountain Bike Association

I am not counting professional organizations that I belong. Does SparkPeople count? I don't belong to any running clubs because there are really none in my area. Maybe I could start one.

Part 3: Volunteering to Build Trails

Like most people that use trails, I never gave it much thought how the trails got there and are maintained. I guess I assumed that some governmental agency built and maintained trails on public lands. I know that Colorado Lottery money goes to maintain Jefferson County and Boulder County open space parks.

However, the magnificent Colorado Trail and the amazing web of trails in Buffalo Creek are maintained by volunteers. The Buffalo Creek mountain bike paradise is just a few miles from my house. On Saturday I will help finish the Blackjack and Raspberry Gulch trails. Besides feeling a duty to contribute, these trails will not be marked on any map for a while. I want to know where these trails are!

Check it out!
comba.org/content/bcbd-full-story

Pretty cools stuff. Ultra Stumpy is just itching to give this trail a go! I am going to bring my map and mark the unmarked trails.



So long for now!


Ultra Stumpy is made for the rough stuff. We are both psyched!

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KAYZAKCX 4/21/2012 11:18AM

    All the trails in my area are maintained by volunteers. I am amazed at what a nice job they do. The trail I rode earlier this week is maintained by my LBS in their spare time. The rest are maintained by local mountain bike groups. Again, they all do an amazing job.



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DAVEWDB 4/21/2012 8:36AM

    That's great. Most people take hiking and biking trails for granted but they're only there because of the volunteers. I think I'll take my mountain bike out for a ride today.

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LMB-ESQ 4/20/2012 1:56PM

    I am not a joiner. In fact, I am as big a loner as they come. (Is that a personality flaw too, in the other direction?) But good luck keeping up with all of that, and I look forward to reading about your mountain biking adventures! emoticon

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LINDAKAY228 4/20/2012 12:15PM

    I have thought several times of volunteering to help with trail maintance around here when I've seen something in the paper about a work day. SOmething has always come up thought. Don't see anything very often, maybe a couple of times a year. I'm still thinking about it and am going to do it one of these days. I really appreciate the trails and feel I should help to make sure they are there for me to use. And you'll find some new trails out of the deal!

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CAROLYN1ALASKA 4/20/2012 11:56AM

    Sounds good to me.
We have a club here too that works on trails. Luckily, mountain bikers are able to use the 550 miles of trails "provided" by our Nordic ski club. The only drawback is that there aren't many miles of single track trails.
Have lots of fun riding, building, and racing on your local trails! emoticon

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KA_JUN 4/20/2012 11:18AM

    Awesome, Dirt Rag is an excellent mag. Sounds like a win-win situation, you get to help trail build, ride new trail, AND ride with others. Look forward to reading your race/ride reports!

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NATPLUMMER 4/20/2012 10:27AM

    Great idea. It will help you utilize UltraStumpy to his full extent. :-)

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Cannot Sell Little Stumpy

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Part 1: Little Stumpy

The guy at work that wants buy my Stumpjumper Comp hardtail didn't blink twice when I quoted a price of $1,200. He likes Little Stumpy. He test rode Little Stumpy and commented that that Little Stumpy seemed as fast and smooth as his road bike. This guy spent a fair amount of money for his road bike. He knew that Little Stumpy was rare jewel.

My friend Jason sold his cross-country hardtail when he bought his Yeti dual suspension bike, He didn't need the money and now he is regretting selling his hardtail. He convinced me to hold onto Little Stumpy.



There is something honest about a hardtail mountain bike. Little Stumpy demands that I become one with him. Ultra Stumpy says, "Relax, I will take care of you. (Note Ultra Stumpy is a dual-suspension Carbon-Fiber bike with a programmed "brain" suspension technology" that thinks for itself. )



This is fabulous bike. Fast and responsive and worth every penny.


Part 2: What About Selling Big Red?

I have an older (2006) Giant Boulder Special Edition (SE). I call this bike "Big Red". Big Red is a nice recreational bike with a very comfortable seat and riding position.



This exact bike is still sold by Giant as the Revel 2 for $400. Big Red's only weakness is an 80mm travel Suntour front fork. Big Red shifts nicely and is reasonably light with an aluminum alloy frame. The low quality front fork really limits Big Red to smooth dirt roads. The thing is that Big Red has flat pedals and nicely padded seat. Big Red is the only bike I own that I can ride without wearing padded biking shorts nor cleated biking shoes. So I am not selling Big Red either. In fact, I just ordered a RockShox TK 30 Coil Fork on sale for $120 delivered.



This fork has an MSRP of $164 and has lockout, adjustable preload and rebound, and 100mm of travel. We just had to replace the Suntour front fork on my Daughter's Boulder SE. The fork failed and one side came apart. She rides like a maniac. My wife got her a RockShox and had it installed before the two of them left to ride through Yellowstone. This fork really extends the usefulness of Big Red. I use Big Red when I want to bike and run during the same session. I also use Big Red for cruising around my neighborhood. Big Red can hit 40 mph and is not slow. I got to keep Big Red.

Thanks for reading my blog.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

ELYMWX 4/19/2012 1:27AM

    So when do the bikes take over the garage and push the cars out?

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KAREN42BOYS 4/17/2012 10:46PM

    Hey, have you heard about this recall?

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub
/prerel/prhtml12/12149.html

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NATPLUMMER 4/17/2012 12:09PM

    Yay for keeping the bikes!!

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TYKXBOY 4/17/2012 11:42AM

    You know a bike is special when you give it a special quirky name.

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KKINNEA 4/17/2012 11:06AM

    You need a special "bike house"!

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BAILEYS7OF9 4/17/2012 10:49AM

    I agree with TOOTHFUL99... you'll need a room just for the bikes!

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NWFL59 4/17/2012 10:22AM

    Good to decision not to sell Little Stuppy and Big Red. Glad you were able to find a deal on the replacement front fork upgrade for Big Red. I have (and use) a street bike made by Giant , model Sedona (women's as I've always hated the bar in the men's version). It's works for my level of cycling around the neighborhood and about certain low traffic areas around town. emoticon

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KAREN42BOYS 4/17/2012 10:07AM

    Sounds like three great bikes

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TOOTHFUL99 4/17/2012 9:32AM

    I have a friend here in Chattanooga who built an extra room on his house...just for his bikes! Maybe you shoud start thinking of a bike room!! lol

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Pushing Ultra Stumpy

Saturday, April 14, 2012

Part 1: Pushing Ultra Stumpy - Rocky and Steep

On Thursday and Friday, Jason, my co-worker and me hit South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado during our lunch break. South Table Mountain is an extinct basaltic volcano and is a favorite among mountain bikers. Here is a shot of South Table Mountain:


You may note how steep the the sides of the mountain are. It is a hard 20 minute climb to get to the top.



The trail is rocky. This is no place to screw-up!



Here is a sample of the major trails. There are many more trails that are not marked.



Unfortunately, there are some big cliffs on this mountain. Again, this is a good place not to screw-up.

This is the terrain that Ultra Stumpy was made for. My friend jason has a very old Yeti. Yeti bikes are made right at the base of North and South Table Mountains. Yeti are "boutique" bikes. They don't make many bikes because the guys that work at the Yeti factory spend a lot of time "trail testing" new products.


Here is a factory photo of Jason's 2005 Yeti. Unfortunately, Jason blew the front forks and the cost is over $600 for a new fork. His cogs are shot also, which is another $300. High-end bikes that can handle South Table Mountain are expensive to buy and maintain.


Part 2: Ultra Stumpy is Fast

As Jason and I climbed up South Table Mountain, Ultra Stumpy just floated up the gnarly, dangerous, rocky and steep ascent. Under full load, Ultra Stumpy shifted to lower or higher gears flawlessly. Jason's old Yeti was grinding and thumping during shifts. Jason is younger and in better shape than me. But Ultra Stumpy ran away from the Yeti.


A Factory shot of Ultra Stumpy. I swear this bike has a motor!


Part 3: Jason Wants a New Bike

Jason wants a new Yeti SB-66. This is a cool bike!

At $4,700 the Carbon Frame Yeti SB66 Enduro is a solid performer. Ultra Stumpy would need to work hard to keep up with this bad boy. Both Ultra Stumpy (Specialized Stumpjumper Expert Carbon 29 FSR) and the Yeti SB66 Carbon Enduro 29 are great machines.


Part 3: Why the Big Bucks for a Bike?

Here is why - Jason and I covered 10.13 miles of rocky and nasty terrain in less than an hour. Here is what my Garmin 305 Recorded:

Distance: 10.13 Miles
Time: 50:14 Minutes (mm:ss)
Average Speed: 12.1 Mph
Max Speed: 23.8 Mph
Ascent: 998 feet

Sounds Slow? Here is a photo of the terrain:


This is a photo of the actual South Table Mountain descent. I got this picture from a Mountain Bike site. The guy in the photo is neither Jason nor me. Just imagine taking this on at 24 mph! It is a huge head rush!


Part 5: Bike Rack for Ultra Stumpy

The swoopy frame on a dual-suspension bike makes it is tough to hang the bike from a conventional rack. Currently, I have to take off Ultra Stumpy's wheels and jam the frame into my car. I have to reassemble Ultra Stumpy for riding. Then disassemble for transport. This is not fun.

I went to a local store called "Rack Attack". Rack Attack sells very nice bike racks. After looking at every bike rack in the store, I settled on a Thule 916XTR T2.


This was the only rack that could handle Ultra Stumpy's frame and 29" tires.

The rack locks to the hitch receiver and has individual cable locks for each bike.



Part 6: Burning Calories

I rode Thursday and Friday. According to the SparkPeople fitness tracker, I burned 2,252 calories. I am down 3 pounds since getting my new bike.

I think that this is good.


Part 7: Sell Little Stumpy???

A guy at work is interested in buying my 2008 Stumpjumper Comp hardtail XC racing bike. He is the same size as me so Stumpy fits him. He has a road bike but wants a hardtail mountain bike. He likes that Stumpy is a custom 3x10 (30-Speed). Most Stumpjumpers are either 20 or 29 speeds. Stumpy's extra gear is for more speed. I made the mistake of telling my wife that someone wants to buy Little Stumpy. But on a smooth single track Little Stumpy is magnificent. Little Stumpy is going to be hard to give up.


I still like this bike a lot. Little Stumpy is a sweet bike and oozes goodness.


Thanks for reading my blog.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

TEDDYBABE 4/15/2012 10:45PM

    I'm starting to see a pattern here. Ultra Stumpy's jockey is not happy unless he is TOTALLY challenged. lol Great blog!

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LISAINMS 4/15/2012 12:05PM

    24mph on that? Yikes, no thanks! I take a downhill road at 36, but that's on pavement with my roadie. I'm such a chicken, lol. Glad to see you are getting your money's worth with Ultra Stumpy.

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DRAGONCHILDE 4/14/2012 8:25PM

    I miss biking. I need to get back into it!

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KAYZAKCX 4/14/2012 7:57PM

    Nice pics. Sounds like Ultra Stumpy has found a happy home.

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GUNNSGIRL91303 4/14/2012 7:28PM

    what a fun blog to read, I feel like I went with you! I would keep ultra stumpy for future adventures and fun!
I would be terrified to do any of that by the way! emoticon

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SWEDE_SU 4/14/2012 5:31PM

    lovely vicarious adventure - thank you!

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TRIGRAMPS 4/14/2012 5:24PM

    "Just imagine taking this on at 24 mph! It is a huge head rush!" Cannot imagine! Would want a full body suit at half that speed, but I want that sweet hardtail!

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KA_JUN 4/14/2012 4:31PM

    Nice. Extinct basaltic volcano, looks like just what the Dr. ordered for your new ride. Looks serious, you bottom out your fork on that ride? Fun, fun, stuff!

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NWFL59 4/14/2012 12:12PM

    Better you than me, glad you and your co-worker had a terrific and exhilarating ride! emoticon

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NATPLUMMER 4/14/2012 12:00PM

    emoticonGreat ride!! Awesome burn!!

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STRIVER57 4/14/2012 11:18AM

    will ultra stumpy not also be magnificent on a smooth single track? doesn't little stumpy deserve to have someone love him full time?

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HKARLSSON 4/14/2012 10:57AM

    What, you can bike on that?! Great googly moogly... Looks like some beautiful country, and a LOOOOONG way down!

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CBAILEYC 4/14/2012 10:54AM

    I truly appreciate that you let me live vicariously through your adventures when you share such great stories and pictures here. Thank you for that.
emoticon
C~

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TWEETYKC00 4/14/2012 9:42AM

    Wow, that sounds like one heck of a ride!

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First Ride On My New Bike

Monday, April 09, 2012

Part 1: No Guilt - Maybe Just a Little

I had decided to use my burning desire for the ultimate mountain bike as incentive to get to my goal weight. My last blog shows that I have no resistance to the siren song of a cool new bike. I had been wanting a full suspension bike after watching the end of the Leadville 100 miler MTB race last August.



But here is the deal - since Saturday I have burned over 1,500 calories riding Ultra Stumpy - according to the Spark fitness calorie counter.

Part 2: First Trail Ride on Ultra Stumpy

Yesterday, I headed for the Flying J Ranch and put in 10 miles on Ultra Stumpy. The "Ranch" has some nice single track trails that are fun, fast and easy.


I took this picture last summer but this shows the trail conditions. Me and Ultra Stumpy were too busy to take photos.


This is pretty. I was there quite late in the day so there were not many other riders or hikers on the trail. Me and Ultra Stumpy could cut loose!


An open "double track" like this is a good place to hit high gear and go!

Ultra Stumpy and I had a great time. I still have a tendency to stand up on the pedals on little bumps. This comes from riding a hardtail for years. Ultra Stumpy can take on these bumps for me. Ultra Stumpy has 29" wheels that can even do a better job handling rough terrain than Little Stumpy's 26" wheels.


Little Stumpy is an alloy hardtail with 26" wheels. At 24 pounds Little Stumpy is 3 pounds lighter than Ultra Stumpy. BTW - Stumpy is OK with being called "Little Stumpy". He did not being called "Old Stumpy".

Part 3: How Fast is Fast?

I wore my Garmin 305 to get some idea how fast Ultra Stumpy could go. I have the same data for Little Stumpy. Here is the results.

Trail Description

Distance: 10.1 miles
Elevation: 8.550 feet
Total Ascent: 1,164 feet
Grade: 15% to 20% - lots of long uphill stretches
Conditions: Dry and calm, 61 degrees F
Surface: Dirt single and double track with occasional roots, rocks and lose gravel

Little Stumpy Performance Parameters (2011)

Time: 59 minutes
Average Speed: 10.2 mph
Top Speed: 26.3 mph

Ultra Stumpy Performance Parameters (2012)

Time: 44 minutes
Average Speed: 14 mph
Top Speed: 37.3 mph

I ride too conservatively. I am not aggressive enough on the descents. Both bikes can go faster. Even though Ultra Stumpy has speed potential, the bike can't go by itself. I need to get better.

Thanks for reading my blog.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

STRIVER57 4/12/2012 2:54AM

    given your injury history, not sure that better = less conservative. yes i'm a wimp. good luck, have fun, and be careful.

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ELYMWX 4/12/2012 1:22AM

    So how did the SECOND ride go?

(as an aside, did Annette realize what she was unleashing by that text?)

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CHANGINGHORSES 4/10/2012 9:21PM

    Cool wheels! Enjoy the ride!

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SKINNYPOWELL1 4/10/2012 8:41AM

    I like your new wheels, have fun.

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LKEITHO 4/9/2012 10:18PM

    Looks like you had a great ride!

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KA_JUN 4/9/2012 6:22PM

    Beautiful trails, well done, you hit 37.3 mph on trail?!? Awesome, our trails here in SW PA aren't open enough that you could open up the throttle like that, so to speak. - Jun

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MEGA_MILES 4/9/2012 4:17PM

    That is one beautiful machine. Yes, I'll admit it, I am lusting over UltraStumpy!

Have fun. Stay safe.

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LISAINMS 4/9/2012 3:15PM

    I'm conservative on the downhills, too. I'm older and wiser, lol. I hope you and Ultra Stumpy have many happy miles together!

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HEALTHIERKEN 4/9/2012 2:49PM

    Interesting blog, full of good information. Keep those wheels spinning!
emoticon

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TOOTHFUL99 4/9/2012 2:16PM

    Congratulations on your new addition! How exciting!!

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JUNEPA 4/9/2012 1:24PM

    Awesome

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KKINNEA 4/9/2012 12:19PM

    Ha, you are a lover of cycles for sure! That downhill looks just crazy - I'm a nervous downhill biker though.

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NWFL59 4/9/2012 11:24AM

    emoticon emoticon Sounds and looks like you enjoyed a great ride! emoticon

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TEDDYBABE 4/9/2012 10:40AM

    Okay, this is way cool! Congrats on "Ultra Stumpy" sounds like its a good fit for you!


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LINDAKAY228 4/9/2012 10:25AM

    Sounds like really awesome ride! Beautiful area. Hope your wife has gotten used to sharing you with your bikes and trails lol!

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NATPLUMMER 4/9/2012 9:59AM

    Beautiful ride. I'm sure you'll start going faster and faster as you get used to the bike.

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My New Bike

Sunday, April 08, 2012

Part 1: Rule #12 - The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.

For those of you that detested algebra, the statement "n+1" translates into "one more". Here is a link to The Rules.

www.velominati.com/the-rules/

You will note that "n+1" can be written as "s-1". In my case, "s-1" represents the maximum number of bikes that I can buy before my dear wife decides that living with a "free spirit" is too much to take. Of course, I call myself a "free spirit". My wife calls me her 54 year-old child. At lease she harbors no illusions regarding my maturity level.

Part 2: Serious Tactical Blunder

I told my wife of my plan to buy a full-suspension mountain bike as a reward when I take off the last few stubborn pounds and get to my goal weight. She thought about for a while. The next day she sent me a text stating that if I got a promotion at work, I could get any bike I wanted.

I had previously told her that I was being considered for a promotion. Little did she know that I had already gotten the promotion. I considered her text message the "green light".

Part 3: A Little Bike History - Mountain Bike #1 - Big Red

The first good mountain bike I purchased was a Giant Boulder SE I call "Big Red". Big Red is a solid recreational mountain bike with an aluminum alloy frame and decent Shimano components. Big Red is a hardtail with an adjustable Suntour front fork with 80mm of travel.



I bought Big Red over 10 years ago for $360 brand new. Similar bikes today go for about $500 to $600. Big Red has 21 speeds with a really low climbing gear. These type of bikes are labeled as "Sport" or "Recreational" and are hot sellers. Even though Big Red is ten years old the bike is not obsolete. Giant still sells this same bike for the same price. I still ride Big Red when I want to cruise around.

Part 4: Mountain Bike #2 Stumpjumper Comp "Stumpy" - Hardtail Performance Bike

I wanted quite a bit better performance and got a great deal on a Specialized Stumpjumper Comp. The bike I bought had a lot of upgraded components and was set up for racing. Stumpy has a light aluminum alloy frame and is a hardtail. Stumpy can handle rough terrain but you have to stand up on the pedals. Stumpy and me have been all over the place. Stumpy has cost me a boat load of money over the years. But Stumpy is cool and fast.


This is a photo of the newest Stumpjumper Comp. This bike retails for $2,000. The Stumpjumper was introduced over 30 years ago and was the first purpose-built mountain bike. Prior to the Stumpjumper, mountain bikes were simply steel road bikes with lower gearing, low riser handlebars and knobby tires. My first "mountain" bike was a Huffy. This $65 iron dog could handle a dirt road and that was it. My "Target Special" Huffy had a rigid frame meaning it had no suspension. The bike was hard to pedal, hard to turn, hard to shift and hard to stop. The Huffy was also ugly and uncomfortable.

Part 5: Mountain Bike Purchase #3 - Ultra Stumpy - I lost my Mind

I drove down to Wheatridge Cyclery to look at a few bikes and pickup a new pair of baggy bike shorts. Wheatridge has a bike demo program. For $100 you can rent a demo bike for a couple of days. In addition to a Stumpjumper FSR Comp ("Super Stumpy"), I was also interested in trying the Trek Rumblefish and Trek Superfly. I walked into the huge bike store and found it was humming.


Wheatridge Cyclery is a big store. While I was there they sold 20 or 30 bikes. They only stock good bikes and parts. They sell good quality stuff at reasonable prices.


They have a huge inventory of Trek and Specialized Mountain Bikes. They also sell semi-custom bikes like Yeti and boutique bikes such as Orbea.

I found the lineup of full-suspension Stumpjumpers. I was gazing at these magnificent bikes when I heard a young woman's voice say, " May I help you?" I looked up and saw a petite young lady in jeans and a blue store shirt. Her jet black hair was pulled back in a pony tail. Her big gold name tag told me her name was Elysa and she was from Golden, CO. I told her I was looking for an FSR Stumpjumper with 29" wheels. She says enthusiastically, "Good choice! I am thinking, "I am doomed."

I asked her about the suspension differences between the Stumpjumper and the Rumblefish. We discussed two-stage shocks. pivot points and four-link suspensions. She knew her stuff.

She asked me if I wanted to test ride a few bikes. Based on my height and inseam measurement, Elysa told me that I was between a medium and large frame bike. She pulled out a large frame Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29. She adjusted the bike for my weight. I took off on this Super Stumpy and right away knew it was too big. Elysa watch me ride thought I looked stretch-out on the bike. She then let me try a Medium Frame Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29.

Stumpjumper FSR bikes use 2 x10 gearing, which means Super Stumpys are 20 speeds. I was a bit doubtful that 20 speeds were enough. I had a great time on this bike. With very little effort the bike was flying. I played with the suspension lockout. This was an exciting bike! 20 speeds were plenty. A huge advantage of 20 speed is that it is really hard to cross chain. I loved this bike! It was smooth and amazingly comfortable. And fast! The price was a reasonable $2800 for this aluminum alloy frame Super Stumpy.

Part 6: Finding The Right Bike

I came back to the shop. Elysa asked how I liked the bike. I told her, "I thought I had died and gone to bike heaven." I then asked, "What are the advantages of a carbon frame?" Elysa said, "I ride a carbon frame Specialized Safire, which is the same as a Stumpjumper for women. The carbon frame is lighter, stiffer and much more responsive." She was a nice kid. She says, "We have a medium sized carbon Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29, but it is still in the box." We walk over to the Stumpjumpers again. She looks concerned and points to a red and black bike, "If you want to get the feeling for a carbon Stumpjumper, you can try this one. The bike is a Stumpjumper FSR Carbon Expert. I look at the price - it is $5,200! I tell her this is out of my price range. She says, "Try to ignore how the bike feels, brakes and shifts." This bike has brain technology which is an inertial system that adjusts your suspension automatically. Every component is of very high quality.


Here is a photo of a Stumpjumper FSR Carbon Expert 29.

Part 7: Amazing Test Ride

Elysa gets the bike all set to go. The seat is adjustable by hitting a lever on the handle bar! I take off on the bike. I am trying to ignore the fact that this bike moves like greased lightning. I thought Super Stumpy was fast. I jump up on the sidewalk. There are people all over test riding road and mountain bikes. A guy testing a road bike is coming the other direction on the sidewalk. He is looking at the his pedals. He doesn't see me. I pull a quick left turn off the sidewalk and up a grassy hill. This bike moves like a cat! I had never felt anything like it! I am in high gear. I stand up and power over the short grassy hill. I am moving at warp speed and I am not even trying hard. I test the handling. The bike responds perfectly, linearly and instantaneously.

I pop back on the road. I take a fast hairpin turn. Even on pavement this bike is on rails. I have demo pedals on the bike. I wonder how it would feel if I were clipped-in. This bike is smoking hot! In a flash realize that I am going to buy this bike.

Part 8: Not Cheap - But Worth Every Penny

I was gone a lot longer than I thought. Another sales person gives me some water. Elysa is no where to be seen. She finally spots me. I had walked Ultra Stumpy back to the rack. She asks, "How do you like the carbon frame?" I just tell her, "This is one sweet bike." She asks, "Well, what is the next step." I tell her, "I want this bike. But the price is a bit much." She says, "I don't think we can come down. We had two and the other one was sold. Specialized doesn't make many of these high-end bikes. But I will go ask." She comes back about 5 minutes later. She says, "My manager says we can go down to $4,800. Ok, it is only $400 off but it sounds better than five grand! I say, "Let's do it".

Part 9: Stumpjumpers are Money Pits

I had to buy pedals. Ultra Stumpy did not come with pedals. I know what your are thinking - $4,800 and it doesn't come with pedals?? I popped for some mid-range pedal., I got Shimano XT pedals for $150. I got a carbon bottle cage, high-pressure pump for adjusting the suspension and a spare 29" tube. Oh, also got what I came to get. A got a pair of Pearl iZUMi Baggy Mountain Bike Shorts.



I got a discount because I just bought a bike. When the manager came over to approve the discount during checkout he said, "That is a very special bike. There are not many out there."

Here is my new bike.


Here is my new Stumpy in his element.



A tag on the bike put the weight at 27.1 pounds. This is a fun machine.



Here are the controls on new Stumpy. This bike cooks!



Here is new Stumpy in the fold. I know that new Stumpy looks big but it actually a little more compact that old Stumpy. The 29" wheels make the new bike look big.

I have some shakedown to do before I can hit the big mountains with new Stumpy. I was just a wee bit premature buying my new Stumpy before I hit my goal weight. I rationalize the early purchase because this great new bike is going to help me get there.

Thanks for reading my blog.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KCNEWF 4/13/2012 9:30PM

    Enjoy! It is well deserved for the great motivation you provide through your great blogs on this site!


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STRIVER57 4/12/2012 2:44AM

    sounds wonderful. remember you owe it several pounds.

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KA_JUN 4/8/2012 11:15PM

    "I had previously told her that I was being considered for a promotion. Little did she know that I had already gotten the promotion. I considered her text message the 'green light'". " Ahahaha...awesome. Time to break in that new drive train. emoticon

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LKEITHO 4/8/2012 10:31PM

    What a great looking and sounding bike! I can just hear your wife saying "For that price it better cook - and do the dishes afterwards, too!" Have a great time with it!

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HKARLSSON 4/8/2012 8:59PM

    Wheeeeee!!!! Oh the places you'll go! This bike shop sounds like a dangerous place to visit. emoticon

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NATPLUMMER 4/8/2012 1:51PM

    emoticon emoticon Enjoy your Ultra Stumpy!!

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