REXTINE1   95,040
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REXTINE1's Recent Blog Entries

The Highway of Life

Monday, April 02, 2012

  
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MS.ELENI 4/2/2012 4:22PM

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That Awkward Age

Sunday, April 01, 2012

  
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MS.ELENI 4/1/2012 10:23PM

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Mysterious Cartoon

Saturday, March 31, 2012



Note: I think this is a glue stick, but I'm not really sure.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

THINRONNA 4/1/2012 8:33AM

    hhmmmmm?

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DJ4HEALTH 3/31/2012 10:35PM

    It means that he should of kept his cap on and would not of gotten stuck!!!

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MS.ELENI 3/31/2012 6:18PM

    mmmmmmmmmmmmmm I don't get it

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MOTTAMAMALOU 3/31/2012 3:40PM

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Elective Surgery

Friday, March 30, 2012



Sometimes you get more health care than you really want.

  
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SMILES650 3/31/2012 3:51PM

  Kinda scary, because it is true!

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MS.ELENI 3/31/2012 11:11AM

    oh how true this is. emoticon

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THINRONNA 3/31/2012 6:24AM

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BLUE42DOWN 3/31/2012 2:22AM

    It's so scary I'm not sure if it's safe to laugh.

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DJ4HEALTH 3/30/2012 8:39PM

    Some times I think that is what they do too.

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How Doctors Die

Thursday, March 29, 2012

It turns out that Ed has a wife and a couple of daughters with him, and doesn't need any outside help. He just decided after a few months in bead the "he's ready," which is the same words used by Elve (a full time RV'er from Arkansas, with lung cancer) and the captain of my high school football team (with bone cancer and a good friend). It's about what I felt when I was diagnosed with kidney cancer and waited for about 12 days to find out if it had spread. The good news was that you didn't have to worry about chemo and radiation, and the bad news was that neither of them did any good, so after two years only two per cent of the patients are alive.

These guys didn't use Dr. Kevorkian's approach, and look sort of like the doctors. There was an article, "how doctors die" in the Tampa Bay Times

http://www.tampabay.com/news/perspective
/how-doctors-diebrbr/1218984

which is pretty sobering for the survivors. It does sort of put Ed's approach in a little different light - not as unusual as it first seemed to me.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

DJ4HEALTH 3/29/2012 9:39PM

    Don't want all those machines either.

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BLUE42DOWN 3/29/2012 7:20PM

    This is much the way I'd want to go. Quality of life is far more important than quantity. I don't want to live to be 103 sitting in a chair in a nursing home, drooling on myself - or even to 77 popping more pills than food to stay alive. I'd rather live well and die when my time arrives knowing I lived it well.

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