REXTINE1   96,693
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What Fun

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

JOYCECAIN 8/18/2012 3:07PM

    hahaha These are just great. Where do you come up with all this stuff?

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ALICERIEGER 8/16/2012 10:26AM

    Thanks for the laugh

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THINRONNA 8/16/2012 3:08AM

    At least he has the barrel!

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S3XYDIVASMOM 8/16/2012 12:25AM

    And how do you sit in a cab once you get one to pull over?

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CAT609 8/15/2012 9:43PM

    emoticon

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SCOOTDOG 8/15/2012 9:28PM

    emoticon

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ERICADAWN1986 8/15/2012 8:39PM

    Lol!

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MS.ELENI 8/15/2012 7:35PM

    emoticon emoticon

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IDLETYME 8/15/2012 7:03PM

    That would be a problem! emoticon

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Clean Arteries

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

JOYCECAIN 8/18/2012 3:08PM

    You are so bad. I can't buy chips. I like them to much. But I do chew them up. I would probably choke.

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BOOKWORM27S 8/17/2012 12:40AM

    Too funny!

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ILOVETOCRUISE 8/16/2012 8:53PM

    emoticon

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THINRONNA 8/16/2012 3:15AM

    Ahhh...finally an excuse to eat potato chips.

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IDLETYME 8/15/2012 7:02PM

    Wish it worked like that!
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LITTLEWIND53 8/15/2012 3:29PM

    Oh, of only.... LOL

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S3XYDIVASMOM 8/14/2012 7:47PM

    I like this idea. emoticon

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MS.ELENI 8/14/2012 7:26PM

    Now that is good to know. emoticon

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How I Make Bread Right Now

Sunday, August 12, 2012

To store the starter, I stay with the quarter cup (two ounce) size, because it doesnít take up a lot of room in the refrigerator. If you freeze the starter it kills the yeast, so it shouldnít be frozen, but keeping it in the refrigerator slows down the growth a lot , which means you can store it for about a month and still bring it back to life by going through at least three generations again. The idea is to always feed the starter with at least as much flour and water as you have to start. You can store the starter a week, and it will still be alive and the yeast will be ahead of the lactobacillus

After the week is up, if Iím not going to make bread I take it out at night and let it rise for at least 10 hours. Then, when I stir it down it gets nicely fluid and sticky. Then I keep a quarter cup and throw the rest away. I add four level tablespoons of white flour to the starter I kept and two tablespoons of drinking water. Use bottled drinking water if the tap water kills it Ė or anything different from what made it go funny last time, but not distilled water.

If Iím going to make a loaf of bread, I do the same thing, but the next morning I split the starter into two containers and feed both of them. After a few hours, I split one of the containers and put half in the other container (Number 2). I feed number one and keep number two stirred down so the starter doesnít stick to the lid. After a few more hours, I split number one again, putting the extra half in the water for the bread, along with the entire starter from number two, which makes one full cup of starter in the water Ė which is four ounces of flour and four ounces of water.

I feed the other half of the starter in Number 1 container and store it in the refrigerator.

To make one large loaf of bread, I use 20 ounces of flour (about five cups), 14 ounces of water (tap water), 1 ĺ cups, eight ounces of starter (one cup stirred down) and Ĺ teaspoon of salt. I put the flour in a container, the water in another, stir in the salt, and then add the starter to the water. I stir the starter and water until all the starter is dissolved, and the pour the water/salt/starter into the flour, and mix it with a wooden spoon until I manage to get all the flour into the dough. Itís important to turn the dough over to make sure there isnít any flour on the bottom or sides of the container.

Then I let it rise for the first time, until itís about doubled in size. When it is, I try to nock it down by banging the container on the counter, and even if it doesnít collapse, I sprinkle flour on the top, and use a silicon knife to pare it away from the walls, one quarter at a time. I flour the side thatís away from the wall, the turn it 90 degrees and do it again. After all four sides are free, I dump it out and, with a little luck, it all comes out in one piece.

I used to use a pastry cloth (an old pillowcase with lots of flour on it) to spread the dough and split it, and I used to let the dough sit in the refrigerator overnight before getting it out so it would be a lot stiffer and easier to handle. I never managed to split the dough evenly, so I started just working on getting a consistent way to make one loaf of bread. The last two times I managed to pour the dough into the bread pan directly from the container.

Once itís in the bread pan, I let it rise until itís doubled again. If it goes too far it will be bulging out of the pan, and then, when I bake it' it falls down some. If itís not too high it has some ďspringĒ during the first 5 or 10 minutes that itís in the oven, so getting it exactly right is a matter of luck and experience. You get bread no matter what you do.

I bake it at 450 degrees for 35 minutes, and pour a cup of hot water in the broiler pan when I put the bread in to bake. That makes the crust harder, so it sounds like wood when you first pull it out of the oven, and makes the crust darker, which Adrienne likes. The steam is supposed to keep the crust soft during the initial baking, so it rises more, but I canít tell much difference with and without the water, and I donít like a rock hard crust.

By storing it in a bread bag, the water in the crumb softens the crust up enough so that I can cut the stuff.

Once you get the familiar with this approach, there are all kinds of variants you can make if the mood strikes you. I just make a loaf of rye bread with caraway seeds. Adrienne says it smells great, but whole wheat and rye flour donít rise as well as white flour. And bleached flour has less gluten too, so you donít get as big a loaf, which is why you want unbleached flour.

To keep it from getting stale, I keep it in the refrigerator, but you can also add just a tablespoon of potato flour to keep it fresh. The potato sucks water out of the air to keep it wet.

To make it rise more you can add gluten or and egg to the dough. Alternatively, you can just focus on getting the hang of straightforward bread for now.

PS Ė When I first started, I just made boles Ė a grapefruit size piece of dough formed into a ball, and left to rise on a cookie sheet. I actually bought a stone and pizza peal, but couldnít manage to reliable throw the dough onto the stone. It turns out you really donít need the stone, and a cookie sheet with a piece of parchment paper on it works just fine. The same thing applies for rolls, which Annie and Jerzy likes last year while they were here for three weeks. I like the bread loves because I want to make sandwiches, and Adrienne likes to make toast.

I finally made a jig that fits the narrow loves from the IKEA pans so she can cut perfectly straight slices, and the ones I cut are all the same thickness all around.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

RAWHIDE64 8/15/2012 10:36AM

    I love bread and we did make bread at one time. Homemade bread is so much better than what I get in the supermarket. I agree that it is an art. It takes time to master the process.

Lew

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REXTINE1 8/13/2012 4:59PM

    When I make that recipe I get a two and a half pound loaf in the long IKEA loaf pan. It costs a total of 60 cents for the material, and probably a few more cents for the electricity for the oven. It's an artisan style bread, and Jerzy (Annie's polish boy-friend, who might as well be married to her) claims my bread is better than any he has found to buy, at least around here. Sweetbay sells "Artisan bread" for loaves individually priced by weight - at $3.99 per pound. So I get $10 worth of bread for about $0.60, and it's not many minutes of work - mostly just waiting for the yeast to do it's job.

After a while, you get so you don't like the bread that's all air - and would rather have something with body to it.

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SCOOTDOG 8/12/2012 11:03PM

    Thanks for sharing. However, bread is one thing I seldom eat unless getting a sandwich at Subway.

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S3XYDIVASMOM 8/12/2012 6:11PM

    This sounds like more art than science. I've made bread from time to time, but this sounds way to complicated for me. More power to you for being willing to do it. It sounds yummy.

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MS.ELENI 8/12/2012 5:50PM

    I know your bread is awesome but way too much trouble for me. I am too lazy plus I don't eat a lot of bread.

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Personal Growth Seminar

Saturday, August 11, 2012

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

ALICERIEGER 8/12/2012 4:30PM

    LOL

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IDLETYME 8/11/2012 7:38PM

    Wow - guess it worked! emoticon

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MS.ELENI 8/11/2012 7:03PM

    emoticon

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SKEETOR 8/11/2012 6:44PM

    Oh my! emoticon

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RPV

Thursday, August 09, 2012

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

ALICERIEGER 8/12/2012 4:31PM

    WOW

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MAHGRET 8/9/2012 10:22PM

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MS.ELENI 8/9/2012 5:35PM

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