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My appetite thermostat is broken

Thursday, November 05, 2009

emoticon Due to years of emotional eating, my "appestat" (appetite thermostat) is broken. It's easy to tell when I'm hungry -- the hunger pang is there. I first try to quench it with water. I was told a long time ago that the body sends the same sensation for hunger as it does for thirst, so try to quench thirst first.

It's harder to tell when I'm full, so knowing what a "normal" portion size is helps. When I go out to eat, I always ask for a "to go" box right away. I cut my meal in half and put the other half in the box for lunch the next day. If it's not on my plate, I'm not tempted to eat it.

I have always been a fast eater. I have 8 brothers and sisters -- if you didn't eat fast, you went hungry! It supposedly takes 20 minutes for the stomach to alert the brain that it is satisfied. It never took me 20 minutes to inhale my food. I currently wear braces (for the 2nd time, had them as a teenager, too). That has slowed down my eating tremendously. Not to mention for the couple of days surrounding my orthodontist appointment, it usually hurts too much to chew, so chewing is done very gingerly. God, in His infinite wisdom, is teaching this old dog some new tricks about eating slowly and savoring the taste of food.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

IUHRYTR 11/6/2009 4:06PM

    Boy, how I can relate to the emotional eating. I can always tell when I wasn't truly hungry because after eating I still don't feel full. That tells me that what I needed wasn't food. Keep up your good work. -- Lou

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TERI99 11/5/2009 9:48PM

    I like your term "appestat!" I totally identify with the emotional eating AND eating fast. After many years of teaching, I had to stuff my lunch in my mouth in 15 minutes, a habit hard to break. Who would think that braces could help?!

I hope your day was as good as it could be!
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Teri

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TERI99 11/5/2009 9:47PM

    I like your term "appestat!" I totally identify with the emotional eating AND eating fast. After many years of teaching, I had to stuff my lunch in my mouth in 15 minutes, a habit hard to break. Who would think that braces could help?!

I hope your day was as good as it could be!
emoticon
Teri

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DIVAGIRL655 11/5/2009 2:27PM

    I saw about you mother; I am very sorry for your pain. It sounds like you were very close. My thoughts are with you.
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ROCKYCPA 11/5/2009 12:10PM

    I also had braces as an adult and boy was it hard to eat when they were tightened. I also understand what you are going thru - I was always a fast eater as well but now I am much slower. I find I enjoy the food more and I know when I am full. Good Luck - you will be successful.

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DIVAGIRL655 11/5/2009 11:51AM

    My second daughter had braces growing up and I remember the pain she seemed to be going through with them. She cried for a couple of days after she got them and now that I think about it she is very thin;) I have started doing the water thing also. It does seem to help. Even if it does not satisfy your appetite it will still help cut back on the portion size I think. Thank you for sharing this with us!!!

P.S.: Whew, I bet it was great having a large family like that!!

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BEAMISH7 11/5/2009 10:53AM

    Until I read this I don't think I ever really realized that I don't even feel full. Ever. When I stop and think it through, I can tell that I am full, but that feeling that you mention doesn't happen to me either.

I like your thoughts and ideas and appreciate your post.

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SMWALKER1210 11/5/2009 9:54AM

    I KNOW WHAT YOU ARE GOING THROUGH. SHIRLEY

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I'm allergic to sugar - there, I admitted it.

Saturday, October 31, 2009


I truly believe that I have an allergy to sugar. (Thanks, TUBBYHUBBY340 for your blog that "sparked" this confession.) I can't eat just a little bit of sugar. Once I take a bite, my body craves more. That's probably from all the years of over-indulging on sugary foods. My pancreas is used to pouring out insulin at the first sign of sugar entering my body, knowing it was going to have to handle a whole lot of it. If I only ate one bite, there was so much insulin in my blood stream that I had to eat SOMETHING to stop the inevitable crash from happening. And what better than more sugar?

Many years ago, I attended a nutrition seminar that was titled “Alcoholism, Diabetes, and Hypoglycemia.” I thought to myself, “What the heck does alcoholism have to with diabetes and hypoglycemia?” Well, I soon found out. The doctor who gave the seminar had a degree in biochemistry. He explained that all three of these diseases – alcoholism, diabetes, and hypoglycemia – are blood sugar disorders. (Yes, alcoholism is a disease, not a lack of self-control.) The doctor showed us the molecular structure of alcohol and sugar. Sugar, in its simplest form, is alcohol.

I attended that nutrition seminar about 15 years ago, and I have looked at refined sugary foods in a different light since then. I think of them as alcohol. Sugar can cloud my thinking as easily as alcohol can.

The family history of women on my mother's side is that most of them developed Type II diabetes. Perhaps coming to the realization that I have an allergy to sugar BEFORE I get diabetes will help me to avoid getting the disease.

For today, I choose not to eat Halloween candy. I didn’t even buy it. I’m looking for a healthier future – free of the family curse of Type II diabetes.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KPMAMA82 11/1/2009 5:18PM

    Powerful information! Thank you for sharing!

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TRACKRBP 11/1/2009 3:14PM

    Interesting...I never knew that there was a link...I'm going to read more about this. I am totally in the same boat as you -- where I find it way too difficult to stop at one cookie/chocolate/anything sweet.

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TERI99 10/31/2009 11:22PM

    This is interesting. I wish you all the best in avoiding diabetes. It is a nasty disease, and working to ward it off is much better than dealing with it later. Good for you!!
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And I'm glad you stepped out of your comfort zone and wrote this blog. It took me awhile to "venture out" into this community. I'm amazed by all the support and so glad I did!

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DIVAGIRL655 10/31/2009 3:52PM

    Thank you for the information. I have a daughter with hypoglycemia and a father with diabetes. So much in common but so different. I never thought of the three together that way but now I have another motive to avoid sugar. Keep up the great job!!!!

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IUHRYTR 10/31/2009 2:45PM

    Truly interesting. emoticon Keep up the good attitude. -- Lou

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BEAMISH7 10/31/2009 2:32PM

    Interesting. I know there is a huge correlation between depression and acoholism - the self medicating thing and my doctor has said that sleep apnea, depression, obesity also have correlations.

Keep you the good work. You WILL break the pattern.

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BREN4376 10/31/2009 2:27PM

    Keep up your great job! Thank you for the info.

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