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DEVELOPING CADENCE: 2011 GOALS, PART 5

Friday, December 24, 2010

In Phase Two of my 2011 training plan I continue strength training but I also transition from indoor bike riding to outdoor bike riding. The reason for the transition is simple: I live in MN and it’s not warm enough to ride outside until March! Actually, some people ride outside through the winter but I don’t have a bike that’s set up for that and even if I did I don’t think I would. I simply don’t want to burn out on my favorite sport so I find it helpful to take some time off in the winter and cross train.

My main goal for Phase Two this year is to establish a higher cadence than I’ve used in previous years. Cadence is the speed at which one turns the pedals and I have usually spun at about 80-85 rpm, which is average. But this year I want to establish a normative cadence of 90-95 rpm because I think this will help me develop more speed, power, and endurance over time.

There are two basic philosophies when it comes to pedaling: mashing and grinding. “Mashers” tend to use bigger gears (harder to push) at a lower cadence. “Grinders” tend to use smaller gears (easier to push) at a higher cadence. Mashing draws more on the muscular system, while grinding draws more on the aerobic system. Since it is easier to develop aerobic endurance than muscular endurance, grinding has become the preferred system of cycling since the days of Lance Armstrong. Lance and his team did not invent the idea of high cadence riding but they perfected it and Lance ended up being the greatest Tour de France cyclist in history.

My natural tendency is to mash rather than grind because my legs are fairly strong and I tend to “poop out” when I push my aerobic system. But as last cycling year wore on my knees began to ache more and more, and thus I started experimenting with a grinding style. This eased the pain in my knees almost immediately and, to my surprise, I found that I was able to produce more speed with less muscular fatigue. So I decided to really buy into the grinding style and work hard this year to make the transition.

There are two aspects of this style which must be developed: the ability to spin fast without bouncing and the ability to spin fast for a long time. Today I’ll share the exercises I plan to use to help me learn to spin fast and tomorrow I'll share the exercises I plan to use to develop aerobic endurance.

1. Steady Cadence: Although it can be challenging to hold a fixed cadence on the road, choose a cadence range (e.g., 95-100) and try to hold it throughout the ride.

2. Cadence Intervals: within and aerobic ride, and after a good warm-up, hold your cadence for 1 minute at 100+ and 1 then minute at 90+; 2 minutes at 100+ and 2 minutes at 90+; 3 minutes at 100+ and 3 minutes at 90+; 4 minutes at 100+ and 4 minutes at 90+; and 5 minutes at 100+ and 5 minutes at 90+. Cool down for at least 5 minutes. Option: go into the drops each time you ramp up the cadence.

3. Cadence Ladder: After a 5 minute warm up at 80 rpm, increase cadence by 5 rpm every minute until you reach 120. Then decrease by 5 rpm every minute until you reach 85. Recover for 5 minutes at 80 rpm and then repeat.

4. Maximum Cadence: on a flat or slightly downhill part of the course, increase your cadence as high as you can without bouncing and then hold if for 1-3 minutes. Recover for at least 3 minutes and then repeat 3-5 times.

5. Isolated Leg: on a flat or slightly downhill part of the course, do 90% or more of the work with just one of your legs for 2.5 minutes and then switch legs for 2.5 minutes. Spin with a relatively high cadence and pay close attention to “dead spots” in your spinning technique. Recover for 2-3 minutes and then repeat 3-5 times.

6. Form Sprints: within an aerobic ride include 6-10 sprints which last only 15 seconds, 10 out of the saddle and 5 in the saddle. The focus of this workout is form rather than power so pay more attention position and technique than intensity.

7. Sprint Intervals: within an aerobic ride include 6-10 sprints of 15 seconds, 10 out of the saddle and 5 in the saddle. It may be best to pre-designate signs or what have you along the route so that “when” you sprint is not left to chance or feeling. Employ all of the technique developed in the previous workout but now ramp up the intensity to maximum. Include at least 5 minutes of recovery between sets.

8. Power Jumps: on a mostly flat course, do 3-5 sets of 5 jumps. A jump is 10-12 turns of the crank (each leg) at a high cadence. Recover for 1 minute between each effort and 5 minutes between sets.

Well, these are the eight exercises I will use this year to make the transition from masher to grinder. My plan is to stay patient early on and let my skills develop naturally rather than pushing too hard right out of the gate. Then, around May, I'll begin completing these exercises at a high intensity and will likely see good results. We'll see how it goes!

Thanks for reading, hope you have a great day!

  


BIKE TRAINER WORKOUTS: 2011 GOALS, PART 4

Thursday, December 23, 2010

In Phase One of my training plan for 2011 I will be completing three bike trainer workouts each week. I have a Cyclops bike trainer on which I mount my road bike and ride indoors. This is much better than training on a cycling machine because it prepares my body to adapt to and bond with my actual bike. Over the years I have collected a number of trainer workouts through which I cycle in this time of year, so I thought I would share them with you today. If you use a bike trainer I would suggest being as intentional as possible for otherwise youll get bored and probably give up.

Cadence:
1. Ramp it Up: After a 5 minute warm up, shift into an easy gear and hold your cadence at 95 for 5 minutes, followed by 3 minutes of recovery. Shift back into an easy gear and hold your cadence at 100 for 5 minutes, followed by 3 minutes of recovery. Repeat this over and again until you reach a cadence of 115. Cool down for 5 minutes (50 minutes).
2. Cadence Ladder: After a 5 minute warm up at 80 rpm, increase cadence by 5 rpm every minute until you reach 120. Then decrease by 5 rpm every minute until you slow down to 85 rpm. Recover for 5 minutes at 80 rpm and then repeat (45 minutes).
3. Cadence Intervals: After a 10 minute warm up, do 1 minute at 100+ and 1 minute at 90; 2 minutes at 100+ and 2 minutes at 90; 3 minutes at 100+ and 3 minutes at 90; 4 minutes at 100+ and 4 minutes at 90; and 5 minutes at 100+ and 5 minutes at 90. Cool down for 5 minutes (45 minutes).

Tempo & Endurance:
1. Steady State: Warm up for 10 minutes, the first 5 at 80 rpm and the second 5 at 85 rpm. Then get in a comfortable gear, take it up to 90 rpm and hold that pace for 45-60 minutes. Pay attention to form as you complete this exercise.

2. Rail Road Grade: This exercise is meant to mimic the gentle undulations of a typical rail road grade. Therefore, warm up for 5 minutes at 80-85 rpm and then increase your cadence to 90 rpm for 5 minutes. Adjust the resistance lever down 1/3 of the way and maintain 90 rpm for 5 minutes. Repeat this cycle 3-5 times and then cool down for 5 minutes (40-60 minutes).

3. Body Position Ladder: After a 5 minute warm up, holding a steady 80-90 rpm, go down into the drops for 1 minute then sit up for 1 minute; go down for 2 minutes then up for 2 minutes; go down for 3 minutes then up for 3 minutes; go down for 4 minutes then up for 4 minutes; go down for 5 minutes then up for 5 minutes. Cool down for 5 minutes (40 minutes).

Strength:
1. 3-2-1 Intervals: After a 10 minute warm-up, ramp it up to the top of your comfort zone for 3 minutes, pretending that youre holding the tire of someone whos better than you but with whom you can keep up fairly comfortably. Then, without a recovery period, push past your comfort zone for 2 minutes, pretending that youre trying to keep pace with someone whos considerably better than you. Finally, give all you have for 1 minutehold nothing back, leave everything on the field. Recover for 5-10 minutes and do it again, working up to three times in one hour (30-60 minutes).

2. Strength Ladder: Warm up for 10 minutes in a comfortable gear and then set the resistance to maximum for 1 minute and minimum for 1 minute; maximum for 2 minutes and minimum for 2 minutes; maximum for 3 minutes and minimum for 3 minutes; maximum for 4 and minimum for 4 minutes; and maximum for 5 minutes and minimum for 5 minutes. Do not shift gears throughout. Cool down for 5 minutes (45 minutes).

3. Strength Endurance: After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to maximum, shift into the biggest gear in the third chain ring, and push as hard as you can for 10 minutes. Recover for 5 minutes and repeat one more time. Cool down for 10 minutes (45 minutes).

Power Endurance:
1. Ouch! After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to the highest level and shift into the big chain-ring. Use the biggest gear you can spin at 80 rpm for 5 minutes. Recover for 5 minutes and then repeat two more times. Cool down for 10 minutes after the third set (50 minutes).

2. Power Ladder: After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to maximum and shift into the biggest gear in which you can hold 80 rpm. Hold that gear for 5 minutes and recover for 5 minutes; shift back up for 4 minutes and recover for 4 minutes; shift back up for 3 minutes and recover for 3 minutes; shift back up for 2 minutes and recover for 2 minutes; shift back up for 1 minute and recover for 1 minute. Cool down for 5 minutes (45 minutes).

3. Power Endurance: After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to maximum and shift into the biggest gear in which you can hold 80 rpm for 10 minutes. Recover for 5 minutes and then repeat one more time. Cool down for 10 minutes (45 minutes).

Climbing:
1. Out of the Saddle Attacks: After a 10 minute warm up, adjust the tension so you feel like youre climbing a moderate hill, about a 6 on a scale of 10. Every 45 seconds get out of the saddle and attack the hill for 15 secondsgive all youve got. Do this 5 times then release the tension and recover for 5 minutes. Work up to 4 sets of 5 in one hour (35-55 minutes).

2. Minute On/Minute Off: After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to maximum and shift into the biggest gear at which you can hold 90 rpm for one minute. Release the resistance for one minute, and then repeat this process 9 times for a total of 10 sets. To add some variety, stand for every other climb. Cool down for 10 minutes (40 minutes).

3. Stand & Ascend: After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to maximum, shift into a big gear, and stand and pedal rhythmically for two minutes. Sit down, release the resistance and spin easily for two minutes. Repeat this 4 times for a total of 5 sets. Cool down for 10 minutes (40 minutes).

One-Leg Workouts:
1. One Leg on, One Leg Off: After a 10 minute warm up, unclip your left foot and spin at about 60 rpm with your right leg only for 2 minutes. Spin with both legs for 3 minutes and then repeat with the other leg. Repeat two more times and then cool down for 5 minutes (45 minutes).

2. One Leg Sprints: After a 10 minute warm up, unclip your left foot and spin as fast as you can with your right leg for one minute. Spin with both legs for 4 minutes and then repeat with the other leg. Repeat two more times and then cool down for 5 minutes (45 minutes).

3. One Leg Power: After a 10 minute warm up, set the resistance to maximum, unclip your left foot and spin as fast as you can with your right leg for one minute. Spin with both legs for 4 minutes and repeat with the other leg. Repeat two more times and then cool down for 5 minutes (45 minutes).

Besides these workouts, I also use Chris Carmichaels training DVD called Time Trial. Chris was Lance Armstrongs coach and he has a number of excellent training DVDs. This particular one works on developing power and aerobic endurance and I have found it very helpful. So Ill generally work my way through all of the above exercises, completing one workout from each category, and then mix in the DVD after Ive completed the cycle. Then I start over and chomp at the bit until the weather warms up and I can hit the road!

I hope this blog has helped you make the most of your trainer workouts. One way or the other it was good for me to go through the process of sharing what Ive put together over the last number of years.

Make it a great day!

  


Strength Training Plan: 2011 Goals--Part 3

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Over the last couple of days Ive shared my fitness goals, strategy, and plan for 2011. My plan breaks down into six phases so for the next week or so I want to comment various aspects of each phase. Heres the summary for Phase One:

Phase One: Gym + Bike Trainer Workouts (Jan-Feb)
Strength train in the gym three days per week, and complete three bike trainer workouts per week using pre-designed workouts or the Carmichael Training Systems videos. The goal of this phase is to develop a base of fitness so I'll be ready to push hard in phases three and four.

With that, I want to share my strength training plan with you and then tomorrow Ill share my bike trainer workouts.

The goal of my strength training season is to improve my overall fitness level by (1) completing 3-4 aerobic endurance exercises per week, (2) completing a strength training circuit 3-4 times per week, (3) scoring in the average range for three of SPs fitness tests by the end of March, and (4) achieving a BMI of 26.4 [200 pounds].

My plan breaks down into three phases. Weeks 1-9 (Oct 31-Jan 1): warm-up with a 30 minute walk, complete the following circuit, and finish up with 30 minutes on the elliptical or stair step machine. My goal here is to prepare my body for more intense strength training in the next phase and thus I don't lift a lot of weight, rather, I lift moderate weight at medium speed and move quickly from one exercise to the next. This adds an aerobic element to my strength training.

EXERCISE-WEIGHT-REPETITIONS-SETS-SPEED
Incline Bench Sit Ups: 0 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Reverse Forearm Curls: 15 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Forearm Curls: 25 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Shoulder Shrugs: 50 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Side Bends: 50 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Pull Up Machine: 140 lbs offset, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Tricep Dip Machine: 140 lbs offset, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Crunch Machine: 100 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Preacher Curl: 50 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Back Extension: 100 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Tricep Extension: 100 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Leg Curl: 80 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Leg Extension: 80 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Hip Abduction: 155 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Hip Adduction: 75 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Leg Press: 300 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Calf Press: 300 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Rear Delt: 80 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Pecs: 50 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Overhead Press: 60 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Chest Press: 60 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Row Machine: 80 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Lat Pull Machine: 80 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Free Back Extensions: 0 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Hanging Reverse Crunches: 0 lbs, 15 reps, 1 set, medium speed
Plank: hold for one minute work up to two minutes
Left Plank: hold for 30 seconds work up to two minutes
Right Plank: hold for 30 seconds work up to two minutes


Weeks 10-18 (Jan 2-Feb 26): warm-up with a 30 minute walk, complete the following circuit, and finish up with 30 minutes on the elliptical machine or the cyclops bike trainer (this is a trainer to which I can attach my road bike and ride indoors).

DAY-EXERCISE-WEIGHT-REPETITIONS-SETS-SPE
ED
Tuesday: Upper Body
Chest Press: 100 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Overhead Press: 75 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Bicep Curls: 30 lbs (per arm), 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Tricep Pulls: 45 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Seated Fly: 75 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Reverse Fly: 100 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Forearm Curls: 35 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Reverse Forearm Curls: 20 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Shoulder Shrugs: 60 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Lat Pulls: 150 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Seated Row: 150 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed

Thursday: Core
Back Extension: 150 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Incline Sit Ups: 0 lbs, 15 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Side Bends: 60 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Crunches: 0 lbs, 20 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Hanging Reverse Crunches: 0 lbs, 20 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Double Crunches: 0 lbs, 20 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Bicycle Crunches: 0 lbs, 20 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Pendulum: 0 lbs, 20 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Plank: 0 lbs, 60-120 seconds
Left Plank: 0 lbs, 60-120 seconds
Right Plank: 0 lbs, 60-120 seconds

Saturday: Lower Body
Hip Abduction: 200 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Hip Adduction: 100 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Leg Curl: 100 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Leg Extension: 100 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Leg Press: 350 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Calf Extension: 300 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Barbell Lunges: 20 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Barbell Step Ups: 20 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Barbell Squats: 50 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed
Bulgarian Lunges: 25 lbs, 8-10 reps, 2 sets, slow speed


Weeks 19-23 (Feb 27-Apr 2): warm-up with a 30 minute walk, complete the following circuit, and finish up with 30 minutes on the elliptical or stair step machine. (The strength training circuit in this phase is identical to that of weeks 1-9. In these months I begin the transition away from the gym and onto the bike and thus I go into maintenance mode as far as strength training goes).


Well, thats the plan. I keep the weights fairly low in the first and third phases and then ramp it up in the second phase. I dont do a lot of power lifting because my goal is not to become super strong but rather to improve my overall fitness level. Id love to hear any feedback or suggestions you might have.

Hope you have a great day!

  


2011 Goals--Part 2

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Yesterday I posted some thoughts about my fitness goals and strategy for 2011, and today I want to say a few things about my plan. My overall goal is to increase my average speed on the bike this year to 18.0 mph. Right now I ride between 17.0 and 17.5 on a normal day, with occasional forays into the 18s, so the idea is to ride between 18.0 and 18.5 with forays into the 19s. Easy to say, hard to do!

My strategy for achieving this goal involves nutrition, cycling skills & physical fitness, mental strength, recovery, and rest (I shared the details of these things yesterday), and my plan breaks down into six phases. For today I'm simply going to give a description of each phase and then I'll come back and say more about each of them over the next couple of days.

Phase One: Gym + Bike Trainer Workouts (Jan-Feb)
Strength train in the gym three days per week, and complete three bike trainer workouts per week using pre-designed workouts or the Carmichael Training Systems videos (Chris Carmichael was Lance Armstrong's coach and he's got some awesome resources for working out on a bike trainer). The goal of this phase is to develop a base of fitness so I'll be ready to push hard in phases three and four.

Phase Two: Gym + Early Spring Road Rides (Mar)
Strength train in the gym three times per week, and take four road rides per week as soon as the weather allows (I hit the road when the temps reach 35+ and the ice melts). As for the road rides, give two workouts to cadence, one to speed endurance, and one to recovery. The goals of this phase are (1) to establish a higher base cadence and (2) to develop aerobic endurance. Thus, speed, distance, and intensity are less important than the quality of each workout.

Phase Three: Gym + Late Spring Road Rides (Apr-May)
Strength train in the gym three times per week but gradually decrease the length and intensity of the workouts. The goal in the gym at this point is simply to maintain what's been gained in the first two phases. As for the bike, continue taking four rides per week but now introduce a weekly strength workout and add more miles. Give one workout to cadence, one to strength, one to speed endurance, and one to recovery. The goals of this phase are (1) to improve base cadence, (2) to develop strength, and (3) to improve aerobic endurance. Although the quality of each workout is still the most important factor, slowly ramp up the intensity so that by the end of this phase you're performing at or near your peak at least three times per week.

Phase Four: The Ride Across Minnesota, or TRAM (June-July)
Commence the TRAM training plan the week of June 5 and carry it through the event (I'll share more about this training plan in the near future). The focus now shifts from developing the base skills of cadence, strength and speed endurance to developing the ability to perform on the bike at a high level five days in a row. You may utilize any of the workouts completed thus far but each day must be viewed as equal. The goal of this phase is to complete the TRAM at an average speed of 18.0 mph. (The TRAM is a 5-day, 300-mile cycling event designed to raise money for Multiple Sclerosis research. My wife has MS so we ride in this event every year and it is my Tour de France, if you will. Thus, my training throughout June and July is laser focused on this event.)

Phase Five: Jesse James Bike Tour (Aug)
After the TRAM, spin easily for two weeks and keep the miles low. Then return to four-per-week workouts focusing on the base skills of cadence, strength, and speed endurance. Give one workout to each of these skills, and one to an endurance ride. Make sure the endurance ride includes plenty of climbing. The goal of this phase is to complete the Jesse James Bike Tour at an average speed of 17.0. (The JJBT is a one-day, 100-mile ride that takes place in Northfield, MN. There are other shorter routes but I like to do the century. The route is very hilly for Minnesota and thus my goal speed is slower than my overall goal speed for the year.)

Phase Six: Gym + Fall Road Rides (Sep-Oct)
After the JJBT, spin easily for two weeks and keep the miles low. Then get back into the gym and complete a basic full-body workout three days per week to prepare your body for the winter gym season. As for cycling, focus on reaching the goal of 3,000 miles for the year and just have fun--ride hard when you'd like and spin easily when you'd like but don't give up until you've reached the goal!

Well, that's the plan. I'll say more in the coming days about particular aspects of it.

Hope you have a great day!

  


2011 Goals--Part 1

Monday, December 20, 2010

Over the next few days I want to share my goals and strategy for 2011. Cycling is my main sport and so my goals are centered around that, but in fact cycling is simply a means to a greater end, namely, to pursue health for the glory of God, the good of others, and the joy of my own soul.

With that in mind here's what I've planned for 2011.


Overall Goal: To increase my average speed on the bike so that 18.0 is the new normal (for the last two years 17-17.5 has been normal).

Strategy:
1. Nutrition:
a. Eat well-balanced diet every day.
b. Keep calories in SPs suggested range every day.
c. Avoid fast-food, fried-foods, and eliminate specialty drinks.
d. Repent from using caffeine! (caffeine and I don't get along very well).

2. Cycling Skills & Physical Fitness:
a. Develop grinding skills (i.e., a high cadence riding style).
b. Develop climbing ability as a grinder (apply new style on the hills).
c. Improve aerodynamic position by lowering the bars and riding in the drops.
d. Improve overall fitness in the gym and on the bike (I'll say more another day).
e. Work hard to get down to 200 lbs by May 1.

3. Mental Strength:
a. Improve personal discipline by sticking to the plan!
b. Improve ability to endure pain especially while climbing.
c. Improve aerobic endurance by taking at least one longer ride each week.

4. Recovery:
a. Be more intentional about post-ride snacks and meals.
b. Develop a post-ride stretching routine.
c. Develop a post-ride massage routine.

5. Rest:
a. Repent from using caffeine, period--oh did I already mention that?!
b. Take naps after longer or more intense rides.
c. Truly rest on your rest days: see rest as a key part of your training.

Well, that's enough for today, more to come tomorrow.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KATE3BOYS 12/21/2010 9:24AM

    Love your goals! I need to sit down this week and next and make a list of goals that I will achieve for 2011. They help keep me focused on the big picture instead of getting lost in the details.

Best wishes and Merry Christmas!

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STEELKICKIN 12/20/2010 9:38AM

    I need to do 1d and 5a, too, LOL! These are great goals and you can do it!
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VAJRA82 12/20/2010 3:18AM

    I especially like 4c. emoticon

It sounds like you're going to have a great year!!!

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2DANCE4EVER 12/20/2010 2:38AM

    You have inspired me to write down my 2011 goals. Thanks.

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