JUNEAU2010   162,138
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JUNEAU2010's Recent Blog Entries

Not Back Yet

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

I survived the day of work, but did not put in the extra time I needed to. I ended up not walking to the polling place, but I still got in more than 9600 steps. I still can't each much. Everything I eat makes my tummy hurt! I imagine this will pass. I sure did expect the days of eating bland food would continue after the procedure! I'm still not even hungry. This is weird.

Just out of curiousity, I stepped on the scale this morning and it said I had lost another pound. I am sure that's from the test, so I am not counting it unless it holds true this Sunday. If it does, this procedure will mean I lost 2.4.

My left heel has been hurting for days, so I was thrilled to be able to walk today. I could hardly move at all yesterday. As I took a short walk at lunch today, a coworker drove by, rolled down her window and said, "Way to go!" I thanked her and kept trudging. She was one of the ladies I spoke to about a month ago about my wonderful pedometer. All I can do is plant seeds, spread the Spark. Everyone knows that no one will make these kinds of changes until they are good and ready. I don't say anything unless anyone asks, but I don't hide what I am doing, so I am out there by example.

I hope I will be back on track nutritionally and in every way tomorrow...

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CARRAND 6/9/2010 10:14PM

    Way to go! I think you're exactly right that you can plant the seed with someone by setting an example, but the time has to be right for them to get started. Good for you for getting your steps in, even though you've had heal pain. You're an inspiration.

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CHAOTIC-KITTY 6/9/2010 8:43AM

  good to hear that your heel is better. i hope your tummy feels better soon. good going on the walking. :) you will get back on track... be patient... and, kind to your body & soul. :)

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LIBBYFITZ 6/9/2010 5:53AM

    All you can do is listen to you're body. When it is ready for food you will know. Have you tried just having soup? Glad to read that you're heel is getting better.
Hope tomorrow is a better day for you.

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MISSY455 6/9/2010 1:25AM

    I hope you are feeling 100% really soon! Way to go getting in 9600 steps especially when you aren't feeling well.
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NISA-JOE 6/9/2010 12:15AM

    emoticon from me too!

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RIPPEDPAUL1 6/8/2010 11:39PM

    you kept moving that's the key

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KELLYERIN 6/8/2010 11:21PM

    I hope your tummy and heel feels better ASAP! Great job on the stepping!

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I Spread the Spark at the Hospital!

Monday, June 07, 2010

Today was the big day: my first colonoscopy. Even with the fast, I did not feel as hungry as I thought I would, though I felt a tiny bit queasy and lightheaded. That was overridden by the nerves. Everyone had told me the test would be the easiest part of this whole process, but I was still a bit nervous.

The team of caregivers they have in this group is fabulous. My intake nurse was Barbara. She is one of these cheerful people who talks through the whole intake process, which was calming for me. Interacting with her meant I did not have a chance to get more nervous. They took me a little bit early because the previous person cancelled. Barbara talked me through some forms and took me to the other room. During the intake process, she noticed I've lost 20 pounds! (My previous doctor with a different insurance company didn't EVER notice!). She asked me what I was doing and that opened the door for me to share about SparkPeople! I was stoked!

At this point, another nurse was supposed to take over, but she was not there, so Barbara stayed. Tessa did the needlework. I have great blood but terrible veins, so this usually means an unpleasant fishing expedition, but she did a great job. Turns out the doctor was the chief of this practice and he had a nice personality. I was abit surprised.

The procedure was the easiest part and, in between drifting off, I was able to see the scan. Kind of interesting. They found no polyps! I don't need to go through this for another 10 years. They did find a hemmorhoid. I was surprised and a bit alarmed. I understand those are painful. Doctor said it was probably aggravated by the cleanse + procedure.

They told me I would need to stay home today and they were not kidding! I was really nauseated afterwards which is supposed to be a rare side effect. I have eaten very little today and have regretted every bite because my tummy hurts! I hope I feel better tomorrow because I sure cannot afford another sick day!

BF caught my cold and I am not completely over mine...

I am not looking forward to work and school tomorrow and will aim to get to bed a little earlier tonight, even though I've slept a lot today!

Happy birthday, Mom! This was my Dad's second wife, mother of my youngest siblings. When I met Dad, I was thirteen, they were married and my brother was a year old. Later I learned that she was the one who got Dad to reach out to his children from his first marriage. Long story short, I ended up moving in with them for summers and going to boarding school during the school year. Had she not opened that door, I am absolutely certain my birth mother would have killed me before I was 18. While my maternal relations are strained, I am blessed to have several women step into the mother role for me. This Mom was one of the first. We are still close and I wish I could have been with her today!
(She lives outside of Albuquerque, New Mexico)

Happy Sparkversary, Chaotickitty! I know it's tomorrow, but, just in case I don't get to comment. (work and school tomorrow). I am SO grateful we are on this journey together!

Thanks to EVERYONE for your TLC comments about this colonoscopy. I could not finish the last 3 glasses of the prep stuff, but, had I not already been drinking a lot of water, it would have been so much tougher to chug. I did not enjoy any part of this procedure, even the sedated part, and I am not 100% sure I would do it again. I am grateful that I got a clean slate report! I am glad that I have 10 years before the next one. By then, I will have forgotten how awful it was and I'll probably do it again, just because of the diagnostic benefits. I hope this has not been too much information. I never shared anything like this prior to SP. Privacy is a good thing, but I am learning that I can gain strength from sharing and getting support and encouragement. I only hope I can return the favor!

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

VICD25 6/10/2010 8:57AM

    Glad it's over for you! (mine's today). . .
Take it easy and rest. It will take some time. (and did you EVER beleive you would miss broccoli????_)

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JHADZHIA 6/8/2010 2:18PM

    I very happy to hear it all went smoothly and you got a clean bill of health!
Shame about the hemorrhoid! I was surprised to be told I have them on my last physical, no wonder I don''t like sitting too long lol!
Get some rest and recover!
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MOM2PACO 6/8/2010 10:07AM

    I am so glad that you have a clean slate! Must feel good knowing that! You were so brave going, I would have been a nervous wreck and you were lucky to have such a wonderful nurse. All done and over with now. You can relax lol!

Go to sleep early and get your rest for tomorrow. Eat light today, don't eat anything heavy as it might aggrevate you.

My Mom passed away on January 23, 2010 - I love her soooo much and no Mom could ever take her place. I am lucky to have had her for 28 years, but she was only 54 and we lost her to uterine cancer....always get yourself checked.

I am glad you found someone to take the place of your Mom, because everyone needs one and now I use my Grandma kinda...not the same but as good as it will get! Shes 75. You are lucky to have a great "MOM", my step mom is no where near a Mom to me. I am lost without my real Mom. You are one lucky girl to have so many people pop up to want to act as a mother to you!

I will wait for the next report in 10 years lol!! Take care!

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NANALD 6/8/2010 9:35AM

    Glad you got a clean bill of health! I don't think it is TMI--it may just have made some else realize that as much as they don't want to they can get through this or some other procedure. I hope you bounce back soon!

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CHAOTIC-KITTY 6/8/2010 8:27AM

  I am so happy that you got a clean slate of health. :) you are such a strong woman.. and, you did great having to do what you needed to do!

Thank you so much for sayin' Happy Sparkversary to me. :) That made me smile SO big. :) And, I am *very* happy that we are SP friends. :)

I hope you are getting the rest you need now. You did great. :)

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UNIBOK 6/8/2010 6:48AM

    Great news, Juneau! And it sounds like you handled the whole situation so well. How nice that the nurse noticed your weight loss, and how nice you were able to shine and spark even in such an awkward and uncomfortable situation.

Feel better soon!

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NISA-JOE 6/8/2010 2:20AM

    It's great that the colonoscopy went well and you managed to spread the spark. Rest up and hope you get well from the cold soon.

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LIBBYFITZ 6/8/2010 12:26AM

    Phew I bet you are glad that is over and done with. Great news that there are no polyps. Hope you recover quickly. emoticon

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D-Day Reflections

Sunday, June 06, 2010

I was not on this earth when D-Day happened, but, as with most families, I am touched by it, thanks to the remarkable "Greatest Generation". Both of my grandmothers were nurses during the war and that was my goal when I was in grade school. My paternal grandfather emigrated from Norway with a degree in engineering. He worked in shipyards. Not being technical, the only thing I understand is that he calculated the optimum circumference of smoke stacks to maximize fuel use. Or something. (I'm not friendly with numbers!) My maternal grandfather may have been a reporter during the war. My dad's stepfather was an anthropologist who answered the call and went into the Army. He was a medic and he was at Utah Beach. That was all I ever knew about his service because he would not talk about it. The way he said what he said, the tone was one that did not brook further conversation on this point.

It was only years after his death that I grew up enough to understand the possibility of the kinds of memories he had and did not want to reawaken to solve a youngster's curiosity. I never got to apologize to him for that question! Now I shudder to think what nightmares I may have reawakened for him!

I have always wanted to serve my country and tried every branch of the service 5 times. I could never pass the physical. My younger brother, now in the Naval Reserves, tells me that I would not have liked being in the service when I could have been in because it was not a welcoming place for women then. I know he tries to comfort me by saying that, but it does not take away my lifelong regret.

I am grateful for those who do serve in whatever capacity. I benefit from their service, their sacrifice of time away from their lives, their loss of innocence, the sacrifice of their families. I know firsthand the nights trying to be calm when I am afraid for my loved one in harm's way. And, there is no way to even the scale when those who serve pay the ultimate price.

What makes the "Greatest Generation" so remarkable is how those who served were not just in uniform of the armed services, it was nurses, it was factory workers, it was ordinary people saving anything that could be used for "the boys" at war -- all their service and sacrifice.

One of those who stayed at home because the Army sent him home when he volunteered was the founder of my company (founded long after his other careers were over!). The enlisting officer asked him what he did and, when he heard the answer, the officer said, "You can do more to help us in civilian life." Dr. Chauncey Starr ended up at Oak Ridge National Labs working on nuclear fusion. During that time, he invented a method of cooling nuclear fuel that is still in use in plants around the world.

I was in grade school when President Eisenhower died. My teacher turned on the tv so we could watch the funeral. He had to step out of the room to take a phone call. A while later, he came back in the room to find spitwads flying, chalk and erasers flying and I was sitting in my desk in the front row crying my eyes out watching the funeral. "I Like Ike" for his leadership and service.

Prayers were said this morning for those alive who have horrible memories of the D-Day invasion and the days following, for those who still mourn the full measure that was paid that day and the following days.

Anything I could say about my SparkPeople journey would be a trivial exercise of free speech that has been paid for with far too high a price.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CHAOTIC-KITTY 6/7/2010 10:44AM

  I really enjoy reading your blogs. They are always so beautifully worded and you are such a fanastic blog writer. Thank you for sharing.

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UNIBOK 6/7/2010 10:34AM

    Juneau, this is beautiful. There are so many ways of serving, and it seems to me you've found your own way.

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JHADZHIA 6/7/2010 9:04AM

    I was the same way, I applied when I was 16 to go into the naval reserves (funny, but that is what we had in the middle of the bald prairies for an army outpost!!) I was in good shape then, with my RA in remission, but they busted me on the physical, why? Because of the damage to my wrists from the first bout of RA, I could not bend them and they thought this was bad -it was written in the manual how far you needed to bend them to get in. Can you believe that? They said it would affect my firing of a rifle. I can actually shoot just fine!!
I do appreciate the sacrifices both Canadian and American soldiers continue to make to keep us all free!!

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LIBBYFITZ 6/7/2010 6:34AM

    Thank you for a wonderfully written blog. You have put into words what a lot of us feel. War is not something any of us want, and I cannot even start to imagine what people went through. Once again , thank you.

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NANNER2121 6/6/2010 11:13PM

    Awesome. Thank you, this brought tears to my eyes. I come from a long line of veterans and my nephew is a recent grad to the Canadian Armed Forces. I could not pass the physical either with my 75% hearing loss. May God Bless and keep safe all our heroes, present and fallen.

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gramma

Saturday, June 05, 2010

The summer cold has been in full force today. I HOPE it's going to be just about gone by Monday morning. I'm afraid Kaiser won't let me go through the procedure. I'm still mouth breathing and running the room cooler and using a blanket (hot and cold!).

Bland food and, after breakfast tomorrow, that's it until after the procedure on Monday. No exercise today, either. Still very stiff and sore and still can't breathe! UGH

The pharmacist warned me that I won't want to leave the house once I start the colon cleanse tomorrow...NOT looking forward to this, but, as a measure of the change in me via SP, I am valuing me enough that I am not letting the prospect of this discomfort deter me from this test. I know they will use this test to screen for preventable problems. I was angry when I learned that Dad knew he had a problem for TWO YEARS before he ever went to the doctor. Had he gone sooner, they might have been able to cure his prostate cancer before it became bone cancer and killed him. I can't put my family through that kind of pain if it is in my power to prevent it.

Today (or tomorrow, depending on who I believe), my maternal gramma would be 104. I was starting my junior year of college, thousands of miles from home, when I learned she had cancer. To this day, I don't know what kind. gramma (and that's how she wrote it: lowercase) was one of my sanctuaries as a young child.

gramma was a woman of and ahead of her times. She divorced my grandfather and raised my mother and my aunt all by herself. She was pro womens' rights long before the 60s came around. I can totally picture her marching for the right to vote, though I don't know if she ever did that. gramma was a nurse during WWII. She looked like one of those sweet little old ladies, so she was always picked for jury duty. What the attorneys did not know what that she was a strong minded, very liberal thinking woman. By the time I started paying attention to politics and social issues, she was ill and then gone, so I never talked to her about things. I imageine we would have had different opinions on some things. But the older I get, the more I find I agree with things she cared about.

gramma was agnostic, which bothered my family a lot, especially at the end of her life. She did not let any of the grandchildren see her once the chemo started. (As if I cared about her hair! She had wigs!) I remember saying to the air: "I don't care about your hair, gramma! It's you I love!" She died five long years later, suffering horribly. There was no service, not that I would have been permitted to attend if there had been one. That lack of closure made me realize how important services are. They are not so much for the deceased as they are for the survivors.

I have tons of wonderful memories of gramma. She was a rescue skier, she knit hats and scarves for homeless people,baby blankets for newborns in womens' shelters and afghans for children with cancer. She had what she called a "working garden." Fruit trees, not many flowers, groundcover. She canned fruit and had a root cellar. She saved everything. What I know of being frugal is from her!

Now that I am older, I can see that I have the same prominent veins in my hands as she did. One of my sisters has the small front tooth gap that she had. I can still remember how she smelled and what her hands felt like as she caressed my hair. She was a heavy smoker and I can still see the massive wrinkles in her face.

gramma: imperfect person, perfect gramma, still loved and missed!

I stayed within range in food, but definitely not in balance. Not allowed veggies or fruit. With this cold and tendonitis, I really miss walking! I am so afraid this hiatus will turn me back into that couch potato that I was before SP. However, as wonderful as my Sparkfriends have been about my "just walking" and other comments, I bet they won't let me slide completely back to the old me. I don't want to go back! I like my walks! Making that statement and meaning it is an incredible paradigm shift for me! Thanks, SparkPeople!

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

MOM2PACO 6/6/2010 7:30PM

    What an amazing gramma you had! I am just as lucky to have a Gram like your gramma. My Mom just passed away of uterine cancer on Jan. 23, 2010!! God how I miss her. My Gram has lost her husband (married 53 years) and two of her children in 3 years. Her two children died 8 months apart! My uncle 49 and My mom 54.

I am having health issues right now and I am not allowed to exercise. I have to have my gallbladder taken out and I get an attack almost everyday but the attacks are lasting longer and longer. My gallbladder looks like a gravel pit apparently and needs to get out. I too am worried I won't be on track when I get back to healthy. I hope I still have the motivation and courage to keep on the good path to weight loss success.

We will get there! One day at a time. One foot in front of the other and each day - day by day! Cheers my friend and take care of yourself! emoticon

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SSCHULTZ59 6/6/2010 4:50PM

    Grandmas are wonderful.. i wish i had half the strength they had to have in their day..

Rest easy and get well soon

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LIBBYFITZ 6/6/2010 9:47AM

    The one positive thing you can take from having the colon cleanse is that you start from the beginning of what you put into you're body. I had the same procedure a few years ago and was advised to eat yoghurt and take "inner health plus" which helped encourage the re growth of normal gut flora.

Sorry to hear you're cold is playing havoc with you're breathing.

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Loved the story about you're gramma, it is sad that you did not get to have those talks with her. But you do have lovely memories and thanks for sharing them.
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Comment edited on: 6/6/2010 9:49:31 AM

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CHAOTIC-KITTY 6/6/2010 8:57AM

  You are not going to turn back into the couch potato that you were. That is NOT an option. :)

Great blog about your gramma.

Take care of yourself .. and, keep us informed of how everything goes for you.

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NANALD 6/5/2010 11:33PM

    Great blog! I don't know how I even got here but I was suppose to come. My gramma and grampa were the most loving people I ever knew. Both died of cancer and, with my gramma the circumstances were very similar to what you went through. She was a schoolteacher, a forward thinker, and believed in things that were out of the box. I wonder if the dying use to be more off limits partially because they didn't understand the disease that well. Then again, feelings were not discussed in the day:( At any rate, thanks for sharing your thoughts about this beautiful lady that lived before her time.

As for staying on track, you are thinking it through, planning, and notifying your support. You know what to do and you are doing it. Like gramma, you are a wise lady. Now take care of yourself and think good thoughts. You'll be back and sparking in no time. In the meantime, like lots of other Spark people, I will be thinking of you and your gramma even if I haven't had the opportunity to know either of you special ladies. Take care and I will look forward to reading that you are back in action again soon! Linda

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JHADZHIA 6/5/2010 11:19PM

    Wow your gramma was a special lady!
Make sure you are drinking plenty of water.. You do need to get rest anyway when you are sick, so take it easy, and take care of you!
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CARRAND 6/5/2010 9:31PM

    Your gramma must have been wonderful because you still miss her.

Good luck on your test.

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JAVALOVERTOO 6/5/2010 9:28PM

    Great reflection on your gramma. emoticon

You are right, your SP friends here support you and say just walk when you can, but as soon as you are well enough we will tell you to kick it in the butt!!! emoticon emoticon emoticon



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Charlie Wedemeyer & Other Thoughts

Friday, June 04, 2010

Charlie Wedemeyer died yesterday. He was one of my heroes, though we never actually met. He was a local high school football coach before and after he was diagnosed with ALS. When I came to the Bay Area, through happy circumstance, I became a huge fan of the San Francisco Giants and, in particular, of their first baseman at the time, Will Clark. One year, I was blessed to have weekend season tickets - best seats I've ever had! That was also the year that Will was the team representative for major league baseball's ALS charity. (ALS is more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease). One game during that season, they had ALS night
and I HAD to be there. (I never saw Gehrig play, but I admire him tremendously). Charlie was there to "throw" out the first pitch. He was already extremely limited by ALS and his wife actually threw the pitch. But he received huge ovations. During that time, he was on a cart riding around the edge of the field. I was standing, cheering and clapping as hard as I could (I can't whistle or I would have been doing that, too.). Charlie paused his waving and looked straight at me for a long few seconds and very slightly winked at me, as if he understood that I was more than a baseball fan at that moment. He was diagnosed with ALS in 1978 and told he had 3 years to live. The fact that he lived this long with that horrible disease is a tribute to his spirit and that of his family. I am heartbroken and crying, even though this is not a surprise. I pray for his family and for the researchers - this disease needs to be vanquished!

The other day, there was a story in the paper about a young man with cerebal palsy (I have a very mild case) who is a golfer. His attitude and determination are both inspirational and humbling. It brought me back to the summer I spent at Carrie Tingley Hospital in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico as a teen. I had surgery on my left Achilles tendon that summer so that, later, I would be able to walk with my feet flat on the ground. Up to that point, I walked on my toes. While I was at Carrie Tingley (she was the wife of a governor who served New Mexico years before), I saw other people my age and younger who would never be able to walk, no matter how many surgeries. I saw youngsters who would be restricted to a wheelchair or a bed all their life. I knew then that I NEVER have a reason to complain! I hate myself when I do slip into complaining because I have seen first hand how blessed I am! As I read about the golfer the other day, I was humbled. I don't like what I see in the mirror!

I have not overcome my own negative attitudes about exercise. Sure, I walk often, but I don't do much else. I don't enjoy strength training and I have yet to have success doing anything other than walking. It's so easy to say "just do it" and it is so hard to actually do it, especially if you have never ever done it before. It's not as if I was athletic before I got fat or that I am an athlete who has been on the DL due to injury. I don't even have exercise as a frame of reference in my life except for physical therapy. As a child, I had PT almost every day for years. I would scream in pain and, eventually, my stepfather allowed me to stop doing PT because he could not handle the screaming (I think I was about 10).

That being said, I have to figure out how to get over this hurdle. Inspirational examples such as Charlie, FDR and a million others shame me and make me look in the mirror, but they are not enough to get me going.

Yesterday, I said I had a sinus infection. I ran a really high fever almost all night and woke up this morning to realize it's a rather powerful summer cold. And I cannot take anything other than Tylenol until after Monday's procedure!
BF went to help a friend move furniture yesterday afternoon. I did not hear from him for hours until he called me at 1:30 in the morning to ask me to pick him up at the hospital 4 cities away. (That's a bit misleading. On the SF Peninsula, everything runs together as if it's all one city!). As near as I can gather, he blacked out. He does not know or remember what they told him, but I suspect it was his diabetes. He knows he needs to eat a certain way but has been rather casual about it. He is home now, resting and sounding much more like himself. I am at work wishing I were at home. My office is apart from others, though still a cube. I am really trying to stay away from people so I don't share germs.

The bland food diet has begun and I miss my broccoli! I miss my high fiber cereal! I miss all my great tasting healthy food!

My Achilles tendon is very, very, very sore. It has been for a few days and I am not sure why because I have not done anything extraordinary. That soreness may have contributed to yesterday's fall. I feel very still and immobile. It will pass, but, in the meantime, I am not moving much...

Charlotte's memorial service is June 12. I think I will go, though I seldom attend ceremonies of any type unless it's family.

I pray for her husband and children. My "God box" is getting very full, too full!

It is warmer today and is supposed to be increasingly warm over the next few days. I do not like heat, but the sun has sure felt good!

Despite the tone of this blog, I KNOW I have a zillion reasons to be thankful, and I am thankful. I have another zillion reasons to be happy and I would be more cognizant of that were it not for this cold! LOL

One of the things about which I am the most thankful is my Sparkfriends community. You may not realize how wonderfully uplifting your comments are on my page and on my blogs. I have gotten out of the habit of responding (time), but gratitude is there for certain!

I will never forget that moment when Charlie and I locked eyes. I knew I was in the presence of a strong man. He will always be one of my heroes!

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CHAOTIC-KITTY 6/5/2010 7:07PM

  At least you *do* go for walks.. and, they *do* count for something. At least you are moving. I agree with you when you said, "It's so easy to say "just do it" and it is so hard to actually do it, especially if you have never ever done it before." .. that is so true.

I hope you go to Charlotte's memorial. It will help you deal with her death (I think).

I hope your Achilles tendon gets better.

I'll be praying for you. Seems like you are going through rough spots and hopefully you will get past it all. And, be stronger because of it. :)

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~Kim

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JHADZHIA 6/5/2010 1:26AM

    Don't put down walking as an exercise. Its all some people do, and it works for them! Just be consistent. The whole idea is to be active regularly and get out of couch potato mode. Walking does it as well as anything. You have to go with what you can tolerate. If its unpleasant, there is no motivation to carry on with it. Exercise should be enjoyable!
Charlie is a great hero, an amazing person, a shining example to people with health problems every where, and especially with that horrible disease ALS.
Do go to Charlotte's memorial, its a nice way to say goodbye.
Hang in there. Once you hit bottom there is no where to go but up!

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MISSY455 6/4/2010 11:47PM

    I am so inspired by your writing. You always describe things in such detail, and make the situation so real to me. I think you should go to the memorial service, saying goodbye and getting closure will be important for you later.

Don't knock yourself for not getting into exercise. Walking is a huge benefit for your bones, heart, and muscles. It is also a positive way to loose weight. You are doing great! When you are ready for the next step you will know.

I hope you get over your cold really quickly. Try to get some extra sleep this weekend, and don't forget to push the fluids. You don't want to get dehydrated with the fever.
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LIBBYFITZ 6/4/2010 11:24PM

    Thank you for sharing. It is a sad time for you. You are allowed to be sad!

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JAKEANDNELLIE 6/4/2010 7:31PM

    Your powerful sharing of your memories pay sweet homage to your hero,
Charlie Wedemeyer. We all need people to idolize and admire for their achievements and he was truly a great choice.
You should go to Charlotte's memorial - it's important for you to have this closure and to say your own goodbye in your own way.
I hope your BF is feeling better and now recognizes the seriousness of eating correctly when you're diabetic. My younger brother is a diabetic and is extremely careful.
You are to be admired for all you have gone through in your life. I wonder if your aversion to exercise is related in your mind to the painful physical therapy you had as a child. I think it would be easy to make that connection.
I hope your Achilles tendon improves and you get back to being able to walk without pain.
Good luck with upcoming medical tests. I'll be thinking of you.
You continue to inspire and motivate me. Thank you.
Stay positive,
Sheila

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