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I know I shouldn't eliminate whole food groups...

Sunday, February 10, 2013

... said the dog before sticking his nose into the cat litter box.
I apologize for introducing my topic by grossing you out. If you were eating dinner, too bad, that's not something you should do in front of the computer anyhow.
But I'm trying to make a point, so bear with me and beat me up when I'm done if you wish. emoticon
What is a "food group" anyhow?
Well, it depends on who you ask. One could consider vegetables, meats, grains, fruit, dairy etc. food groups. That seems to be the most common use of the word. By that definition many people who are allergic or sensitive have to eliminate whole food groups.
Then one could consider carbohydrates, proteins and fat food groups, but usually those are called macro-nutrients, same with vitamins and minerals which are usually lumped together as micro-nutrients. Out of the macro-nutrients only protein is truly essential on a short term basis, meaning we could survive, and even thrive for quite a while if they were eliminated. Even a very thin person has about 40,000 calories stored as fat. Our body can make sugar from protein in the liver (gluco-neogenesis) that is absolutely needed for brain function. Of the micro-nutrients most are essential, some the body can produce.
We can also distinguish foods into natural and processed foods with the second category having many levels, from simple freezing, chopping or cooking to very elaborate chemical processes. Most people know that most highly processed foods can safely be eliminated and are definitely not essential for a healthy person, quite the opposite.
And then there is yet another definition of food groups, the one that makes the least sense of all, and that leads me back to my original example: Foods that we commonly eat and are in a strong habit of eating or like to eat or foods that have been presented to us on a regular basis and that we consider "normal food" for that reason.
The question is why would anyone even consider such a non-sensical definition of food group? I can only think of a few reasons:
-The person could be addicted to the food and justify/rationalize using it. An example of this would be wheat or sugar or alcohol.
-The person was exposed to this food for a long time and everyone around them frequently ate that food. An example of this would be trans fats, corn, peanut butter and jelly (for Americans) and wheat and sugar fall in this category as well.
-Someone put a lot of energy and effort into convincing us that this is indeed a worthwhile and/or essential food. A good example for this is fast food and frozen dinners, because we are convinced that they save us time. Whole grains and soy and peanut butter may also fall into this category.
Most of us simply don't have the energy to wade through mountains of information on the internet, much of which is contradictory, to determine the right way to eat. Therefore the above approach, "I shouldn't eliminate whole food groups" seems to be a way to eat somewhat balanced and avoid the worst mistakes.
Let me suggest an alternative: Invest a few hours, maybe a total of 10, to research very different approaches to healthy eating over the course of a month. Even if you have to take this time out of your precious exercise time I think it will be worth it in the long run. Read about several very different approaches that many people consider healthy nutrition, maybe vegan, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, organic... whatever has been suggested to you.
If you were to buy a new car you would do your research (I hope). You want to get a good return for your investment. With a car purchase all that's at stake is your money. With your food purchases your life is at stake.
I want to encourage you to learn enough to where you have a clear understanding about which food groups are truly essential for health and which ones are just advertised as such by interest groups that want nothing but your money.
If you are wondering if some foods may have an addictive hold on you try to eliminate them for a month. You may be surprised.
And if necessary, put a pressure-gate in front of the room that has the cat litter box in it. emoticon

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KELTIC-CARA 2/25/2013 6:19PM

    Definitely do the research, I would suggest from various sources to help get a balance point of view. Great blog

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CATHYGETSFIT 2/14/2013 10:09PM

    Wow, you've given us a lot to think about! I have been trying to do a little reading here and there so that I can make the best food choices I can. I think that the best we can do is spend the time to do as much research as we can. Getting our information from reputable sources of course and then being our own guinea pigs, so to speak, and really listen to what our bodies are telling us. The problem is that most people don't want to take the time or don't think they have the time to do the research and they don't listen to their bodies. I think there is a lot of so called "food" out there that really is not good for us! Thanks for posting this blog! emoticon

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WENDIT 2/12/2013 1:06PM

    emoticon I loved this blog post.

I've been researching a lot lately, and with some better informed choices in front of me, changed a few eating habits and I'm feeling GREAT!

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-LINDA_S 2/12/2013 11:46AM

    Great blog! This site drives me crazy on a regular basis with some of these dietary platitudes, and I regularly answer questions on the quiz or trivia the way I know they want me to, all the while knowing that they are WRONG! I was looking at a magazine this morning called "Clean Eating" to see what they were referring to. Well, of course it was replete with healthy whole grains and ways to reduce fat intake. They had a nice recipe from Suzanne Somers but couldn't resist adding that reducing the butter and oil would make it healthier. Suzanne knows better! I've done quite a lot of research, which can be very confusing, as you know. I don't know what the answer is, but I suspect it can vary greatly from person to person. Real food, adequate protein, lots of good fats and lower carbs seems to work for me.

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ERIN1957 2/11/2013 1:26PM

    LULUBELLE65, said it better than I could have.
I look to the professionals and follow the science, not the professional sales person or guru. Many can take a study and twist and turn it and make it fit what they are selling.
As well, OOLALA53 make valid points too.

I love that you brought this subject here.

Oh how we change, when we learn to read, and see like a parachute...of course one that is functionally open. LOL

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EGALITAIRE 2/11/2013 1:20PM

    Great blog Birgit,

I am in complete agreement. I also agree, based on my own research over the last couple of years (recreational, not scientific or exhaustive), that much of the research out there is questionable, even the research from "reputable" sources.

If one really wants to dig down, there are usually a multitude of confounders in any research, there are also conflicts of interest (research being sponsored by parties with a financial interest in the result), and just poor science. Epidemiological studies are not useful for determining an individual's response to any given food, groups of food or eating patterns - there are just too many possible variables in those studies, not to mention most of them are self-reporting, which means we have to trust people to accurately remember what they ate or did and to then accurately report it.

I agree with you Birgit, that 10 hours would give one a reasonable foundation for making some decisions, but to be 100% sure, it would take more than 10 hours - I have probably invested 100 and I am not SURE.

So how do we decide. In psychological research it is called "converging evidence". At some point enough evidence is amassed, through research, the experience of others and our own experience, that it becomes reasonable to make a conclusion.

For me, after doing the research, reading and talking to others who have tried various things, I decided the only way to truly know what would work for me was to test it.

That doesn't mean I was reckless - I did the research, and listened critically to what has worked or not worked for others and then tested. I have found some things that work for me - at the same time, I and the process, are a work-in-progress - I am still testing - there are so many variables it can be challenging to sort through them all.

When I hear "you can't" or "it's not healthy to eliminate a whole food group" I have to question if that is actually true - that is the first science I tend to look into - has anyone done it, for a long periods of time, successfully.

There is quite a bit of "evidence" available, my caveat would be to evaluate people's experience, ask critical questions and not listen to opinion - and ironically, that's just my opinion.

To your health

Michael

Comment edited on: 2/11/2013 1:23:27 PM

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LILY_SPARK 2/11/2013 10:40AM

    I don't eliminate whole food groups entirely -- but for a time.

Being Celiac -- doctor diagnosed not BS -- I went off anything with gluten (of course) and once healed, began doctor-supervised year + of elimination testing. Due to also having a few auto-immune disorders, that included common trigger foods (that I can eat some of but better not go too crazy with).

Point being: nightshades, citrus, garlic, etc. I can eat them. I also will start reacting (mouth ulcers, fevers, joint swelling). I'm eating tomatoes this week after all that chatting about potassium. I'm limiting myself to one serving a day and enjoying it immensely! I hope that I can get away with that on a long-term because I DON'T like the idea of having to cut out such wide swaths of foods! I'm being careful doing this and not doubling up (having citrus or garlic TOO).

All I can say is boy, is it nice having tomatoes! :)

I still cheat with dairy, too and I've known for over 40 years that I cannot digest it. I get a lot of skin problems from dairy, which are unsightly as well as painful, so you'd think that I would avoid it entirely. Nope.

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LEW0213 2/11/2013 10:28AM

    Excellent blog and well written. Really gives me something to think about as I go on my search to figure out how to get off this plateau I've been on for the last year. Thanks.

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LULUBELLE65 2/11/2013 9:55AM

    I would caution that when you do your research, you need to make sure that you are looking at scientific research from reputable journals which have been peer reviewed, and which follow proper scientific procedure. There is a whole lot of questionable "science" out there. If the study cannot be recreated, or is of a tiny sample, it is not really valid research, however tempting the outcome is.

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SAGELADY2 2/11/2013 6:00AM

    Hey Gopintos, are you on Mark Sisson's site as well? I was reading up (catching up actually) and saw what looked like you. :-)
True that about wheat. My personal n=1 bears me out at least. Rhuematoid arthritis - gone, joint pain - gone, gut issues-gone; all with eliminating wheat. Every time I've strayed back into wheat for a quick reality check or just craving the first thing out of the block is my tummy roars, gurgles and splurgles. Closely followed by joint pain and swelling.

Anyway...I'll keep the kiddie gate up on that one.

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JSTETSER 2/11/2013 5:56AM

    I agree 100%!
We must be mindful of what goes into our body!
Read my blog on hope!
Fall 7 times, get up 8
http://www.sparkpeople.com/myp
age_public_journal_individual.a
sp?blog_id=5245923

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OOLALA53 2/11/2013 5:26AM

    I have researched it. It's not about what is needed. It is about what research has shown people have been likely to change in the long run.-five years or more Yes, there are some successes, but they are in the extreme minority and have often had very specific health issues. But it's a free country.

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GOPINTOS 2/11/2013 4:53AM

    I know. The other one that gets me, is "everything in moderation"

I was just re-reading my notes from Perfect Health Diet, on wheat in particular. THere's tons of science in the book but the takeaway is this: "Cereal grains damage the intestine and impair digestion. They impair immune defenses and make people vulnerable to chronic infections. They can be addictive and cause or worsen schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. They trigger autoimmune disease. They promote cancer growth. They reduce IQ and brain volume. They promote obesity. They measurably increase mortality rates in gluten-sensitive and diseased populations. They are the food most strongly associated with mortality in the China Study. We know how hard it is to give up bread. Yet there may be no single step that can do more to improve health."

If I read nothing else, this should be enough: "Epidemiological evidence suggests that nearly everyone who eats wheat dies earlier."



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GLC2009 2/11/2013 4:30AM

    emoticon WOW. pretty heady writing. when is your book coming out? you know alot and you certainly write well. impressed, as usual.
--g

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KAPELAKIN 2/10/2013 11:41PM

    Good analogy. I get kind of tired of hearing that phrase myself. When it comes down to it, there are precious few food groups that we really need (vegetables and some animal protein basically). However, I won't dismiss a style of eating that does eliminate food groups. Paleo certainly provides me everything I need, but for sake of convenience I still choose to eat other foods part of the time (kind of an 80/20 approach). People with allergies obviously don't have the same luxury, and it certainly makes sense for you with the dramatic results you've seen by eliminating dairy.

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TRACYLYNN853 2/10/2013 10:32PM

    emoticon

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How my favorite dog and I handle being sick

Friday, February 08, 2013

Me: I feel horrible! (it's just a cold)
Dog: I don't have as much energy today. Will go sleep some more.

Me: What can I do to feel better? Maybe eat? Nothing tastes good. This is so annoying. I don't even have the energy to make myself feel better by going shopping. emoticon
Dog: I'll feel better after another nap.

Me: I wish I didn't have to do any work today.
Dog: I'm just going to stay in bed today and let the other dogs handle the emergencies (like barking at passerbys).

Me: I don't feel like exercising at all but then I'll lose all the benefits I've worked so hard to get.
Dog: I don't feel like moving around a whole lot. There is always time for that after some more rest. Maybe next week. In the meantime I'll dream about running through the fields and playing with my buddies.

Me: Why doesn't someone care enough to make me breakfast and serve me in bed? Do I have to do everything myself around here?
Dog: Why doesn't someone care enough to make me breakfast and serve me in bed? I guess I better check the kitchen counters.

Me: I'll die if I don't get better really soon!
Dog: Snore...

Me: Where are the drugs? Who said I don't like to take pills?
Dog: Give me a nice belly rub and a warm body to snuggle up against.

Me: Finally, the drugs are working! I'm human! There is a purpose to life! The world is not all evil! How come I didn't see that before?
It's going to be a beautiful day!
Dog: I smell the air, so many messages, got to get our there and read them all. It's going to be a beautiful day! Maybe I'll catch some mice on our walk.

I hope you are planning on having a beautiful day, even if times are hard sometimes.
emoticon

Birgit

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KELTIC-CARA 2/25/2013 6:12PM

    emoticon Great blog

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GLC2009 2/14/2013 2:46PM

    sounds like our house.

this past couple weeks, my cat was sick, then one of the dogs was sick and now my dh has gone to bed with a sore throat emoticon at least he's not puking. the cat and dog had puking ailments and it was terrible (i'm not good with puke)

Comment edited on: 2/14/2013 2:47:22 PM

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GOPINTOS 2/10/2013 4:41PM

    Love this!

Thanks for sharing!

Smile and Enjoy the Rest of Your Day!
Melinda
Perfect Health Diet Team
Country Living Team
Wheat Belly Team
Calorie Cycling Team
Missourians Team

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EASTENDCLAM 2/10/2013 12:54PM

    Sometimes dogs really are smarter than we are.

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LMB-ESQ 2/10/2013 10:41AM

    Haha... this is funny! And so true! Hope you really are feeling better!

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SCHNOOTIE 2/9/2013 11:46AM

    Love your blog, It made me laugh, while my lab and my Oodle are snuggled up with me on the couch.

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SHARJOPAUL 2/9/2013 8:25AM

    Gee you have it pegged for sure.

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MARITIMER3 2/8/2013 6:00PM

    We can learn a lot from our pets. I've had more cats in my life than dogs (one cat right now plus minding one for a neighbour for the past 3 months), and they are so wonderful about showing how much they love us, and how little they demand.

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ERIN1957 2/8/2013 5:38PM

    So cute!

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HEALTHY4ME 2/8/2013 4:30PM

    lol had to laugh at the counter surfing! Our puppy hasn't but will still jump up if we don't catch her. She is learning though but that was funny. Often wonder what they are thinking.
Hope you feel better soon.


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LYNNWILK2 2/8/2013 3:51PM

    That is hilarious.... the life of a dog... rest, it can all be dealt with later, after another nap. When you feel so bad, you have to remember that you need to rest more when you aren't feeling your best.
I am glad you've found the purpose in life and the medication is helping you feel better.

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LILY_SPARK 2/8/2013 2:27PM

    Birgit,
Such of a fun read, sorry you and the dog had a hard time getting moving, though!

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BROOKLYN_BORN 2/8/2013 1:04PM

    Great attitude! Hope you feel better soon.

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NAYPOOIE 2/8/2013 12:51PM

    Wise dog.

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-LINDA_S 2/8/2013 11:46AM

    I wanna be the dog! Life is so much simpler for them! And I do tend to take it really easy when I'm sick, but then no one depends on me for very much that can't wait.

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_RAMONA 2/8/2013 10:15AM

    LOL!
{{{{{{{{{{ HUGS }}}}}}}}}}}

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FREELADY 2/8/2013 9:51AM

    Delightful! I'm glad you handle illness by being CREATIVE!!

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CINDYTW 2/8/2013 9:25AM

  emoticon gladyou're feeling better! I hate taking cold medicine too! Hate the side effects!

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MANDIETERRIER1 2/8/2013 9:19AM

    That is exactly how my dogs feel

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More progress

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

My body scan yesterday revealed that my body fat finally dropped a bit from 23% to 22% and my muscle mass increased by another 2 lbs. My total weight was up by about 4 lbs. but the rest was water, which means I was better hydrated, a plus in most situations.
Next appointment is in about 6 weeks to check A1c again and recheck body composition.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KELTIC-CARA 2/25/2013 6:09PM

    emoticon emoticon emoticon

emoticon

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SHYFEMMEKAT 2/7/2013 10:55AM

    emoticon
That's great!

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ADAGIO_CON_BRIO 2/7/2013 8:56AM

    Superb results! Good for you!

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-LINDA_S 2/6/2013 9:42PM

    Great results! Continued success!

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ACCEPTINGME73 2/6/2013 5:42PM

    Way to go 2lbs of muscle!!! Awesome! emoticon

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WOUBBIE 2/6/2013 3:34PM

    Woohoo! Good results!

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It's not about the weight - Weight does not matter much

Monday, February 04, 2013

I find myself saying this all the time. I even hear or read people agree with me and then act the opposite. There are a lot of weight loss challenges on Spark while at the same time there is advice about not stepping on the scales too often. Spark gives the option of recording one's weight or other things like measurements like body fat but most people have a weight ticker.
Most people acknowledge when asked that it is more important to be healthy than to lose the weight but then they try to lose additional weight by reducing salt intake and thereby dropping water weight. Skinny fat (low lean muscle, high fat but normal weight) is not healthy. Walking 30 minutes a day is not enough to be functionally fit or healthy.
Being normal weight is not an indicator of health, in fact many people who are normal weight are still pre-diabetic. I was one of them and did not even know. Many people who are normal weight still have high blood pressure, high triglycerides or low HDL or even all of them and are at significant risk of heart disease or stroke or diabetes.
Gaining muscle is harder for me and is generally harder for women than for men. But I would still rather gain one pound of muscle than lose one pound of fat.
I'm not talking about big or bulky at all, just strong enough for functional fitness. When I can do the monkey bars at the local playground with ease and do a few pushups or pullups I'll be happy with that.
I'll have another body composition analysis at the doctor's office on Tuesday. I hope that my strength training has paid off and I have gained some more muscle and maybe even lost some more body fat. If not I will continue to figure out what to do to make it happen.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KELTIC-CARA 2/25/2013 6:08PM

    Seeing the scales move is great at first, it is only as we get closer to our goal we start to think of the things your are keeping tabs on, like body fat and muscle tone etc.

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_RAMONA 2/7/2013 10:38AM

    This is a GREAT blog... I just wish blogs like these weren't so lost in the wilderness... they are never the ones featured by SparkPeople.

The only way that the scale has helped (and continues to help) me is by teaching me just how much my weight can vary from day to day... as much as 10 pounds in my more extreme circumstances (my 'weight' is incredibly hormone driven). I figured out early on that the way I eat cannot cause a 10 pound weight gain overnight, so I've learned to watch for other more meaningful changes (measurements, clothes, definition, general trend). I really like that I can now actually visually tell the difference between the muscle and fat on my body.

"When I can do the monkey bars at the local playground with ease and do a few pushups or pullups I'll be happy with that." Me, TOO!!! :)





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GOPINTOS 2/6/2013 9:19AM

    Oh I know. I guess it is because it is the best way to judge that most of us have. Being so overweight, the scale going down is very motivating. As you get closer to an ideal weight, there are much better measures than the scales. The ups and downs along the way can be very taxing though. I like to weigh often to see the effects of certain foods on me. If I were more of a normal weight, I could probably see/tell it without the scale. And like last week. I just knew I had lost weight. I felt like I had. I was out of town and couldn't weigh. I came home to a gain. Uggh. But I am still eating right so I don't let it get me down. Just surprised is all.

Thanks for sharing!

Smile and Enjoy the Rest of Your Day!
Melinda
Perfect Health Diet Team
Country Living Team
Dr Oz Show Fans Team
Wheat Belly Team

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JSTETSER 2/6/2013 5:51AM

    Life is such a balance!


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EJOY-EVELYN 2/4/2013 11:18PM

    The scale is a quick measurement, when combined with a host of other measurements and signals that alert me to the status of my health. The scale probably matters more to me only because it's such an easy measurement to take. It's wise that we remember there are many elements to take into consideration. It's all part of the learning process. You've really got a great handle on the information at hand.

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ERIN1957 2/4/2013 1:29PM

    Some of us receive medication by our weight and we all know the more meds we take the more side effects we can have. I have to weigh whether I like it or not. I have a goal to drop weight so I have less medication and maybe even stop meds all together. So I look at is as an important number to work toward, not a game...but a positive tool. I enjoy seeing it as a positive reinforcement.

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WOUBBIE 2/4/2013 12:16PM

    The way my pants fit is much more important to me than what the scale says. We've been conditioned to invest the scale numbers with too much respect. As a reminder, those "ideal weight" charts? They're made up by insurance companies, not physicians, for the purpose of quickly gauging "risk" when insuring someone.

If you're trying to lose fat for looks, then just look at how you look. If you're trying to lose weight for health, then measure your blood pressure, blood sugar, insulin levels, and triglycerides. THOSE are the important numbers that have strong correlations with health. "Weight" is a pretty amorphous number when you come right down to it, and doesn't distinguish between water, fat, bone, or undigested food.

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MARITIMER3 2/4/2013 12:01PM

    I seldom weighed myself most of last year... and I regained 14 lbs. I need the discipline of weighing myself regularly... and for me that means once a week. I understand that weight naturally fluctuates, and that if I have too much salt I can retain water, but still, over a month, I want the scale to go down a bit. If not, then I step up my exercise and make sure that I weigh, measure and track what I eat very carefully.

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HOUNDLOVER1 2/4/2013 11:42AM

    It is hard indeed to ignore the scales if everyone around us is talking about what the scales say. It is just as hard as saying NO to donuts when everyone or what seems like everyone around us eats them. It starts with the awareness that we want to be different and then systematically putting reminders and positive reinforcements in place throughout our lives that will help us to make the switch in thinking and acting.
It is true that the scales are very easy to use. But the tape measure would only take 30 seconds more, not a huge time commitment either. Alternatively we can take one picture from front and one from the side once a month. This will show the difference between muscle and fat quite well. emoticon

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-LINDA_S 2/4/2013 11:13AM

    I want my fat percentage to go down and lean body mass go up. If I look good and feel well, I think I'll be happy. But I'm still more obsessed with the scale than I should be. It's so hard not to be!

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TIGGERJEAN 2/4/2013 9:32AM

    emoticon

I think the key word is healthy. Everyone has different body types, a different health history, different gene pools. The problem comes when people equate 'skinny' with healthy. There is no magic number on the scale that makes you healthy or more beautiful. It's about what your body can DO - whether 110 pounds or 220 pounds. We have amazing bodies and we are powerful when we choose to exercise them. Forget the scale - do you feel good about yourself and what your body can do?

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BROOKLYN_BORN 2/4/2013 9:21AM

    While I also want to be strong and gain muscle, I wouldn't go as far as to say weight doesn't matter much. Somehow when I lost weight, the body fat % went down right along with it. I don't stress about either of them. My ticker is maintenance weeks.

I know it's a lot easier for me to run up hills without the extra pounds I was carrying. At my age (65) I probably can't expect to get faster, but I want to maintain that 10 min/mile pace (or a little less) as long as possible. That extra weight wasn't doing my heart muscle or my joints any good.

Cardio, strength training, flexibility and balance. I want to maintain/improve all of them for quality of life.

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NELLJONES 2/4/2013 8:33AM

    Weight is the easiest indicator to track, so that's what most do. You have to figure out what you want, and how much you are willing to do to get it. Only you can determine that.

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NKOUAMI26 2/4/2013 6:19AM

    emoticon

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JSTETSER 2/4/2013 5:59AM

    I agree. I'd rather gain a pound of muscle too. Low weight is not my ultimate goal, optimum health is!
I hiked around Hillsborough enjoying the Stone Arch Bridges and the ice jams. Check out the photos!
http://www.sparkpeople.c
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=JSTETSER

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TINAJANE76 2/4/2013 4:04AM

    I tell myself that again and again, but it is so hard to really get my mind focused away from the numbers on the scale and more on my other indicators of good health now that I know I'm well within a healthy weight range. Good luck with your body composition analysis!

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PINKEUROGIRL 2/4/2013 1:16AM

    Very wise words there

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ZRIE014 2/4/2013 1:11AM

  you need to control you weight but watching the scale too much will only get you down.

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Finally - Long Run

Sunday, February 03, 2013

The weather was beautiful and my resting pulse was down another 7 beats this morning, so cutting out dairy seems to be working.
I decided to give a long run a try. I made it easy on myself by waiting until midday when the temps were around 50 degrees and sunny.
I ran 8 miles in 1hr. 52min.20sec., average pace 4.27 mph, avg. pulse 135
The running felt effortless and my breathing was better than ever. It felt like I was getting more air and my throat felt clear without any mucus production for the first time that I can remember. I never had asthma but always noticed having some trouble breathing at higher heart rates and I do remember having mild exercise induced asthma/shortness of breath even when I was high school age. Now I'm wondering...
I looked at my running records from a year ago when I was preparing for the same half-marathon and my 8 mile run was at a 4.2 mph pace. The fact that I'm at about the same place is encouraging given that I did very little running over the last 3 weeks.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KELTIC-CARA 2/25/2013 6:04PM

    emoticon

emoticon

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GOPINTOS 2/6/2013 9:19AM

    emoticon Thanks for sharing!

Smile and Enjoy the Rest of Your Day!
Melinda
Perfect Health Diet Team
Country Living Team
Dr Oz Show Fans Team
Wheat Belly Team

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CINDYTW 2/4/2013 5:22PM

  emoticon

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EJOY-EVELYN 2/3/2013 11:36PM

    Glad to hear about your great progress.

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-LINDA_S 2/3/2013 10:05PM

    emoticon Wish being off dairy solved my mucus problems. It's going on 5 weeks and no improvement...

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SAILOR64 2/3/2013 8:53PM

  Great Job!

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MARJORIEWRIGHT 2/3/2013 8:30PM

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