HILLSLUG98239   28,668
SparkPoints
25,000-29,999 SparkPoints
 
 
HILLSLUG98239's Recent Blog Entries

It's only 500 calories - easy peasy!

Thursday, January 02, 2014

I hiked Badger Mountain by myself yesterday. The Hubs hemmed and hawed, and finally admitted he didn't want to go. He's become quite the housecat, and it was cold yesterday. I can't blame him, but I was disappointed. I was hopeful we were starting a new tradition of hiking Badger Mountain every New Years Day. And I like spending time with him without the distraction of the TV.

On the plus side, because he wasn't with me, I was able to do do the over-the-top & back hike. It's too much for him, and I was able to do this at my own pace. It's a good challenge; I think I'm going to start doing this once a month because it's a nice change of pace from my usual workouts. For the curious, here's the route: www.endomondo.com/workouts/281625403
/4750423


The other advantage of my hiking this alone was I got to talk to myself. First, I got my argument with him out of my system. But I also came away with a new commitment to be cautious about what I eat. I know - intellectually - that losing one pound a week is a reasonable goal. I note - enthusiastically - that losing a pound a week translates into fifty pounds a year. That's some powerful motivation.

And that's when it hit me: it's only 500 calories a day. And I can do that. You see, I pretty routinely eat 2500 calories a day. 3000 isn't all that unusual. I know that 2000 calories a day is a more than enough, and it's sufficient to allow me to consistently lose weight.

Exercise isn't the issue. While sloth and gluttony are my favorite deadly sins, I tend to stay pretty active because I geniuinely enjoy it. My problem is how much I eat. I think my best option is to keep that motivation - FIFTY POUNDS! - out in front of me. I'm not sure I want to be fifty pounds lighter - that would put my in the mid-130's - but heck, why not shoot for it anyway? (God forbid I should have to eat more to keep my weight up!)

I was elated when I lost those ten pounds right after surgery, but I've not lost any more. I keep gaining & losing the same five pounds over and over. Maybe it's time. Maybe I'm finally ready to change.

(If you're reading this, and you're thinking of suggesting I log my food, don't. I do log my food. That's why I'm very aware that I frequently eat twice as much as most women. It hasn't proven to be much of a deterrent.)

I just had a clever idea. I printed out a picture of a British 50-pound note. I'm going to put them up on the fridge, on the bathroom mirror, on the dashboard of my car - anywhere I think I need reminders of what will happen if I cut out 500 calories a day: FIFTY POUNDS!

emoticon emoticon emoticon

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

MILLIE-MILOU 1/4/2014 6:29PM

    That looks like a great walk. I need to get out and do more walking myself but I am addicted to my bike riding.
I too am committed to eating 500 calories a day less. So far so good. Its easy to find swaps when you give it some thought, without depriving yourself.
Happy New Year.

Report Inappropriate Comment
MISSG180 1/4/2014 11:49AM

    You and I have about the same goal for the year, and you are absolutely right!

Report Inappropriate Comment
EBRAINK 1/4/2014 10:51AM

    For me, logging food helps because it's waaaay too easy for me to forget what I'm eating, and how much of it. But once I got consistent with logging, I discovered that without any real effort I was eating very consistently - and consistently like a person who weighed what I weighed (though without paying attention, I could easily eat more and be a person who weighed more). To be a person who weighs less, I just need to eat like a person at that lower weight. I already have the habit of eating in a consistent calorie range. I just need to eat at that slightly lower range. From my logging, I knew that would mean eating only 200 kc fewer, which would mean a long haul change - but I'm in it for the long haul, and I want to build the consistent habit.

And 200 kc? That's about two pieces of bread a day.

You'll find livable ways to swap out 500 calories, I bet. You can do it!

Report Inappropriate Comment
DDOORN 1/3/2014 10:31PM

    SO with you on that eating thing...! Logging works for me...it's just that I fight logging so. But am putting some effort into it...paid off before, it'll pay off again.

Yep, 50# of reminders...lotta heft! :-)

Don

Report Inappropriate Comment


A Letter to 2014

Wednesday, January 01, 2014

Dear 2014:

We've only just been introduced, but I am optimistic. I am hopeful that we have good times ahead of us. But please understand if I seem a little reserved. 2013 started off great. We had some wonderful times that I treasure. But 2013 snuck in some well-timed kicks to my teeth, so I'm a bit weary.

We started 2013 with the Hubs employed in a job he really liked. It was a temporary position, and the job is 73 miles from our house. But with the exception of a few temp gigs, he'd been out of work since he moved down here to be with me in June 2009. So we were elated he'd found work he liked, co-workers he liked, and a decent paycheck.

Magic, my beloved grumpy old mitted blotch tabby, died in January. He'd been declining over the previous few months. I'd had Magic since 1996, and the shelter estimated his age at the time as three years. So he'd had a good, long life. He was an amazing hunter (just rodents - birds were too much work with too little meat), but he retired from hunting at ten. (And squirrels, bunnies, and mice rejoiced!) At his fattest, he was twenty pounds. Fifteen pounds was a healthy weight for him. A month or so before he died he was down to eleven pounds. He didn't eat the last week of his life.

Although Magic was my cat, the Hubs loved him even more than I did. I was kind of relieved when Magic died because I couldn't stand seeing him waste away. The Hubs was pretty torn up. We both miss Magic terribly.

Spike, the mackerel tabby I adopted after a co-worker found her abandoned and starving at two months of age in 2003, had always lived with Magic. She took his decline and death hard. The Hubs and I weren't ready for a new cat, but Spike needed a companion. And that's when Cheeto arrived.

In late January, Cheeto showed up at the courthouse. He's a mitted marmalade tabby polydactyl. He has huge thumbs with a claw in the crotch between his front paw and thumb, and dew claws on his hind legs. He was skinny and very gregarious. He walked up to every human he saw and figured-eighted around their legs. A co-worker took him home, even though her husband had told her he'd move out if she brought home another animal. (He didn't move out.) She took care of him for a few weeks while we debated if we could accept another cat so soon.

Spike & Cheeto did not hit it off. Spike is very timid; Cheeto is dominant. They learned to tolerate each other. Occasionally they'd curl up and sleep together or they'd groom each other. Mostly, though, Spike hated Cheeto.

In April, the company the Hubs was working for hired him outright. No more temp work! He still loves the job, but his 150-mile a day commute wears on him. He's put on weight because all he wants to do on his days off is sit at the computer and play video games. This is causing a fair amount of friction in our relationship, but we recognize this is temporary. The first four years of our relationship, there was a mountain range between us. The Hubs hopes to stick with this job for a few more years - as long as he can handle the commute - and then look for work closer to home.

In April, a crazy idea popped into my head. I will celebrate my 50th birthday in September 2015 by completing an Olympic distance triathlon. At the time, I viewed running as something one does to avoid putting on too much weight in the winter. The cycling portion is cake - I commute by bike about nine months out of the year. The longest I've ever ridden in a single ride is 76 miles. I knew going in the swim would be the hardest part for me. I am not a swimmer. But I'm at my best when I'm working toward a goal, and this goal is whole lot cheaper to accomplish than getting a masters degree in public administration. And no matter what happens, I'll be a lot fitter because of my efforts.

Three weeks after that, I went in my six-month ultrasound to check the growth of the fibroids in my uterus and the cyst on my left ovary. During that screening, they found a tumor on my right ovary that wasn't there at the last screen. My doctor recommended a complete hysterectomy. The look on her face summed it up: she looked worried by what they'd found. While she wanted to the operation as soon as possible, it wasn't so dire that she wanted to do it immediately. So we set a surgery date for mid-June. The bad news? No running, cycling, swimming, or lifting anything heavier than 20 pounds for four weeks post-op.

The surgery was more complex than my doctor anticipated, but it went well. There was no sign of cancer and all the biopsies came back negative. And while I couldn't do any of the list above, I could walk. In fact, the doctor encouraged me to walk as much as I could tolerate. So walk I did. Some days I went out for three walks. It was hot (100F), and it felt great. Although I did wimp out when it got to 106F - that was too much for me.

I got the typical "swelly belly" a few days after the operation. That took a couple days to go away. And then, inexplicably, I lost another ten pounds in about a week. It took a few weeks for my appetite to come back, but even while it was gone I was eating at least 1500 calories a day. My doctor has no explanation for the weight loss.

A few weeks before my surgery, my mom had a colorectal carcinoma removed. At the time, my parents were very coy about what was happening. Only now do I know she had cancer. There was a complication with her surgery, and a few days later they did emergency surgery and put in an ileostomy. Since then, my mom has been miserable. She hates having to deal with the bag. And adding in the misery of chemotherapy has been too much for her to bear. She wants to die. She's only sticking with chemo because my dad keeps reminding her she promised him she would. There have been some set-backs, but she should be done with chemo in a few weeks. Six weeks after that, if all goes well, they can put her intestines back together and she'll be done with the bag.

In September, a kitten walked into our garage. No one reported him missing and no one called in response to the "Found Kitten" sign I put up on the block's mailbox. And so Tuffy became our third cat. Cheeto now has a playmate, so Spike gets some relief. And Tuffy wears Cheeto out. Tuffy went to the vet to be neutered a few days ago. The vet discovered he is (or was) a cryptorchid, which means his testicles did not both descend. That turns a routine neutering into more complex surgery because the un-descended testicle was up near his kidneys. The vet bill was $200 more than it would have been. Our free kitten is costing us plenty. (Good thing he's adorable.)

At the end of November, the Hubs had an emergency appendectomy. He had a miserable experience in the hospital, which stands in direct contrast to my great experience in the same hospital. He had some complications, and he was in the hospital for five days. The whole process was exhausting for me. I went there three days in a row thinking I was going to bring him home. We're both grateful for the pastoral care visitors from our church. It's amazing what that little bit of contact can do for your spirit.

I joined a gym in October to have access to the pool. I've come to appreciate what the gym offers beyond the pool. And I'm really struggling with swimming. Fairly soon, I plan to work with one of the trainers at the gym. I really need help. Otherwise I'll be backstroking my way through the swim portion of the triathlon.

Although we're deep in debt (I still owe more than $100,000 in student loans from law school, and we racked up a lot of credit card debt while the Hubs was unemployed), I'm grateful we can afford good vet care for our cats and I can afford to pay for a gym membership. Between the two of us, we pay the local hospital $450 a month to cover our share of our hospitalizations; but I am grateful we have health insurance which paid 80% of the bills. We both have jobs we're good at that we enjoy doing. And while our marriage is under some stress, we're both stubbornly committed to pushing through this.

So while I'm glad 2013 is behind us, I recognize the good things outweigh the bad. It's just that the bad was pretty glaring. 2014, I'm hopeful that you can continue to provide us with good times, and maybe throttle back on the kicks to the throat. I'd sure appreciate it.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

DDOORN 1/3/2014 10:27PM

    Cheers to less throttle & smoother sailing in 2014!

Don

Report Inappropriate Comment
OBNURSE3 1/2/2014 12:33AM

    Great Blog! I could so relate to many things you wrote. I too had surgery in 2013 that prevented me from exercising much longer than anticipated..and a follow up procedure that prevented me from exercising again in October...but made it through it all. I am a cancer survivor and I am keeping your Mom in my prayers.

You are a very strong person and your ability to stay positive and be grateful will keep your marriage strong.

Heres hoping 2014 is full of love, laughter and successes

Report Inappropriate Comment
MISSG180 1/1/2014 5:03PM

    2014 and I have been having a cozy chat about being noneventful and fun. We all need it!

Report Inappropriate Comment
JUJUMILLER 1/1/2014 2:39PM

    I was sorry to hear about your loss and your hospital experiences.
You sound like, despite your setbacks, you have a very good attitude!
Keep it up!

emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
AJB121299 1/1/2014 2:21PM

    nice

Report Inappropriate Comment


Keepin' at it

Friday, December 27, 2013

The holidays have wreaked havoc with my gym schedule. My gym is locally owned, as opposed to being owned by some soulless corporate overlord. And, as is often the case with small locally-owned businesses, they treat their employees well. There were no classes after 11 a.m. on Christmas Eve, nor will there be any after 11 a.m. on New Years Eve. The club closed at noon on Christmas Eve and it will close at 5 p.m. on New Years Eve. It was closed Christmas and will be closed New Years Day. *sigh* Here I am with all this time off and no gym to go to because they give their employees time off.

The Hubs and I went for walks on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Normally, we'd be visiting his family, but with the holiday being in the middle of the week we opted to stay home. (We're going to visit his mom this weekend.) They were 3-mile walks, and I was impressed because he kept up a 3 mph pace both days. (That's a little quick for him.) So I didn't go for a swim or get my but kicked by the Spin Nazi; I did treasure that time with the Hubs, though.

Got in a Group Ride with Eric (Spin Nazi) last night. I got a painful reminder why us old folks are reminded to do high cadences to save our knees: I had the resistance up really high (Eric kept yelling at me!) and I was probably at a cadence of about 10 RPM. Heck, I'm a HillSlug, and I never climb that slow. (Primarily because I'd fall over if I tried.) My left knee hated it. Next time, I'll probably not let the mean Uber-fit man at the front of the class goad me into destroying the connective tissue in my knee. Probably.

Had a weird pain that I've NEVER felt before: When I stood up (on the pedals), I felt twinges in the phlanges in my left foot. Ever since my surgery last June (removing out-of-date abdominal organs, had nothing to do with my foot), my left foot has been weird. If I brush up against the outside of my foot (pinky toe side), it's quite tender. That tenderness is in the same area that hurt like the dickens last night. But that's it: just some random tenderness. And I've been running on it since my surgeon cleared me to run back in July. It never hurts while running, and last night was the first time it hurt during anything other than bumping up against something.

I've had a few other random oddities since my surgery. My thirst seems to have increased at least 50%. My feet cramp fairly regularly. I suppose I should go to the doctor, but it's pretty random complaints. On the plus side, my doctor is a runner, so he's probably more apt to recognize weird random foot problems than an obese chain-smoking doctor. (Or at least more inclined to be sympathetic.)

I was supposed to do a strength training workout last night, but Eric left me weary and a little cranky. I'm planning to go for a swim tonight after work and then do a strength training workout. Or maybe I'll just do the strength training. Maybe I'll just wait and see how the mood strikes me when I get there. (Always a dangerous option.)

Oh, and I noticed that Eric wasn't sweating last night. I kind of hate him for that. He's doing at least 120 RPM cadence with his resistance cranked way up and he's not even dewy. Dude, you could at least pretend it's difficult for you.

emoticon emoticon emoticon (why isn't there an ice bag emoticon?)

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CLEARNIGHTSKY 12/31/2013 6:20PM

    I'm glad that your doc is athletic, too. Good job on all your working out. I am hoping for you to get some answers to your post-surgery issues soon.

Report Inappropriate Comment
MISSG180 12/28/2013 5:46PM

    Surgery can lead to all kinds of weird little nerve reactions. I hope yours clear up quickly.

Report Inappropriate Comment
HILLSLUG98239 12/28/2013 11:17AM

    I agree about the increased thirst. That, combined with the foot cramps, points to a possible thyroid issue (according to WebMD). I have a strong family history of Type II diabetes; if the increased thirst was more marked, I would have gone to the doctor much sooner.

I had a four-week recovery post-op. All I could do was walk. I walked a LOT, but that was all I did. It's possible something has changed about my stride, but I'm unsure what the mechanism would be. I haven't been on a real bike in about 6 weeks. My road bike is currently in the shop, and once she's healed my LBS guy is going to re-fit me to the bike. I'm looking forward to that.

One of the joys of middle age is stuff just hurts. I usually shrug it off. I don't think I recognized how much I was hurting prior to my surgery because I was a peri-menopausal woman and I figured the answer I'd get from a doctor was "stuff just hurts." The foot issue has gotten to the point that it's interfering with things that are important to me, so it's time to go to the doctor. (I got out of the pool earlier than I'd planned last night because my right foot was cramping up.)

I think I'm giving myself enough recovery time. I still take a day or two a week completely "off," with the possible exception of a walk with the Hubs. I skip a day between the same workout, and I'm sticking to my 2-times-a-week schedule for running, swimming, riding, and strength training. I'm struggling to get enough sleep, but I've been reassured by other crones that this will work itself out in time.

As you probably tell, I've spent a lot of time analyzing this. If I worked my body as hard as I worked the analytical part of my brain, I'd be in much better shape.

Report Inappropriate Comment
SPEEDYDOG 12/28/2013 10:20AM

    Hello Slugger,

Um, I wonder if you are walking, running and pedaling a bit differently since your surgery. Sometimes if a person has some pain or tenderness in one part of the body, the person will subconsciously move in a way to minimize the pain. Unfortunately, favoring one side or another can lead to strains and sprains. I guess that may be something to thing about.

On a stationary bike, I like to keep my cadence pretty high. I have a "natural" cadence range from 80 rpm to 110 rpm. 90 rpm is really ideal for me.

I think going to the doctor is a good idea. Have you increased your activity lately? Are you giving your body time to recuperate between workouts?

Random little pains that pop-up then go away are pretty common. The increase in thirst sounds a bit suspect.

Take Care, Bruce

emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
HILLSLUG98239 12/28/2013 9:55AM

    I'm pretty sure the seat is at the right height. I'm more comfortable blaming the Spin Nazi.


Report Inappropriate Comment
APONI_KB 12/28/2013 9:20AM

    did you have the bike at the right height?

I can't remember the rule of thumb but there is some little thing about how if the front of your knee hurts the seat is too high and if its the back the seat is too low.

that's probably wrong though

I'm about to hit my busy time at work so who knows what will happen to my gym time. ugh

Report Inappropriate Comment
ZAEMOM 12/27/2013 8:04PM

    Good for you for working out even when it wasn't convenient! I hope you are ok!

Report Inappropriate Comment


Maybe next week will be better

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Although I had Monday & Tuesday off, I didn't go to the gym. I reorganized the garage. That was good work, but it wasn't a workout.

I went to Group Kick Wednesday night, and Group Ride Thursday. Eric was the instructor for the Group Ride. Some club members call Eric "the Spin Nazi" because his workouts are tough. He's an Ironman, so he's Uber-fit. This was my second class with him, and he kicked my butt!

The Monday & Wednesday Group Rides are pretty full, so the club added Tuesday and Thursday nights. Fewer people attend those. There were only six of us in Thursday's class, and two of them walked out about 20-30 minutes in. Those that remained were teasing Eric about his 30% attrition rate.

After the ride, I did a strength training workout. I believe I am making progress. Some of the exercises on a physio ball are killing me. They don't look like much, but by the time I get to the end of the set I wonder if I'm going to be able to walk.

I'm also up to seven pull ups and chin ups - with the maximum amount of assistance (112 pounds). I paid attention to keeping good form on most of the exercises, especially engaging my core. It made a difference: my abs are a little sore today. (And this is a no-crunches workout.)

I went for a swim today. It sucked. But I'm keeping at it. I really need to strengthen my upper back and neck. Holding my head in line with my body is really tiring - it's kind of ridiculous how weak I am. I spent most of the time in the pool doing the backstroke, just to get in a workout. I don't expect to backstroke my way through a triathlon, but it's a start.

I'm still working on drills. I am getting better, but progress is really slow. I have to content myself with the small improvements. And I suspect I will be working with a trainer sooner than I thought.

I really had to drag myself to the gym this week. I've had a case of the *meh*s. I doubt I'll get a run in this week. I plan to get up early enough to tomorrow for another Group Ride. Maybe next week will be better.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

SPEEDYDOG 12/24/2013 11:17AM

    Wow, you are really working hard! It sounds as if you are doing quite well. I think if you keep at it you will see some dramatic improvements.

I have done spin before and love the term "spin Nazi".

I can understand your case of the "mehs". You have been working-out pretty hard.

Thanks, Bruce

Report Inappropriate Comment
HILLSLUG98239 12/21/2013 1:49PM

    My goal is two swims, two runs, and two strength training workouts a week. I'm not currently commuting by bike, so I'm aiming for two Group Ride classes a week. I usually have a day or two a week during which I do nothing except for a walk with the Hubs if the weather allows.

I'm doing the Group Kick class Wednesdays because it's something totally different than the other things I do, and it's a total-body workout. And it's kinda fun, but I suspect the fun factor is solely because of the instructor. (She seems like she's having a great time, and she's working at least twice as hard as I am.)

I'd hoped to schedule one brick workout a week, but I probably won't do that until I get back to bike commuting. There's something amazingly cool about turning one's commute into a T2 practice and brick workout. I'm sure that racks up the IronGirl points.

Once I get back to bike commuting, scheduling workouts will be a challenge. The club is eight miles from home and eight miles from work. I can ride there. work out, and then ride to work, or ride there, work out, and then ride home. We'll see how that works out once the time comes. Last year, I went back to bike commuting in early February, but that was a really mild winter. (I'm okay down to the mid-20's, but that assumes little to no wind. Freezing temps and stormy weather is too much for my delicate constitution.)

The primary purpose of this blog is to encourage me. I find that writing out the stuff that bugs me helps me analyze why it bugs me, and that helps me focus on the solution. If I don't work through the process, it's too easy to focus on the negative. And I can't do that if I want to complete a triathlon!

Report Inappropriate Comment
EBRAINK 12/21/2013 1:20PM

    Sounds like your "mehs" are being overpowered by your "gottas". If you're going to do that tri, you gotta train. (I suppose you could do it the other way, but I suspect you would not approve of the outcome.)

I'm curious though - do you build down time or recovery time into your training schedule? Do you "rest" by alternating workouts so you're not doing the same type of work with the same muscles every day? I ask because when I'm working up to the daily bike commute, it takes me a month or so to gradually build up to feeling comfortable with riding every day...and then once I acclimate, it stops feeling like it's exercise...

Report Inappropriate Comment
MISSG180 12/21/2013 12:19PM

    You are inspiring me! I was just about to give up my gym membership because I simply haven't been going, but maybe I will rethink that....

Report Inappropriate Comment
BJPENNY70 12/21/2013 1:52AM

    Sounds to me like you did excellent. You keep that up and you will be in an Iron Man, before to long. emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
KKLENNERT809 12/21/2013 1:46AM

    What a great mix of exercise and routines!!

Report Inappropriate Comment


Battling the *meh*s

Monday, December 09, 2013

I have today and tomorrow off. Finally took my road bike into the LBS for some much-needed attention. And then I headed for the gym.

A very large part of me wanted to settle in for a long winter's nap. It's still unseasonably cool here - highs in the 20's, overnight lows in the single digits. I'm usually okay with cycling down into the mid-20's, but I can't seem to get myself to do it so far this winter.

I swam for a bit. I spent most of my time in the pool backstroking just to get in a brief cardio workout. I tried a bit of Total Immersion Swimming drills. My most recent a-ha! moment proved to be true: I was letting my head drop entirely too low into the water. I found a "sweet spot" at which my body is balanced but my head breaks the surface. Sadly, I can't hold it very long because my neck/upper back muscles are weak. WEAK. WEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEAK.

I then headed upstairs for strength training. I'm really making progress in that department. I'm using Holistic Strength Training for Triathlon, and instead of doing 3 sets of 8-12 reps with a weight that's heavy enough that you really struggle to do the last few reps, HSTT calls for one set of 20-30 reps with lighter weight. The suggestion is to quit with enough left in the tank that you can do one or two more quality reps. Form is really critical. HSTT means NO crunches, but to adequately train your core muscles, you have to engage them when lifting.

There's a lot of stuff done on a physio ball or a BOSU ball. Boy howdy, do those do a number on me! I'm supposed to be doing push-ups on a medicine ball. I use a BOSU ball instead - I can't do one quality push-up, so trying to do one with my hands that close together is probably impossible. I did seven lame push-ups on my toes and the remaining on my knees. I can really feel them in my shoulders. There was a time I could knock out twenty-five push-ups. Who knows - I may be able to do that again some day!

I've never been able to do a pull-up. The club has a machine that assists you - the most weight it will offset is 112 pounds. I've increased the number of pull-ups & chin-ups each time I've done a workout. I managed 6 (almost 7!) of each today. I've always wanted to do a pull-up. I'm confident that I will be able to do a pull-up some day, unassisted. I have no idea how long it will take me to get there, but it's going to happen.

I went to the club with a really lackadaisical attitude. I knew I was going there to workout, but I wasn't enthusiastic about it. I wasn't terribly enthusiastic post-workout, either. But I guess that was an important test: I didn't really want to workout, but I did. I love cycling, so even when I was ambivalent about riding, I knew that once I got warmed up I would be happy I was on the bike. (I've only regretted one ride in my life: the hell ride through the Yakima Firing Range on the Iron Horse Trail. No, the Army wasn't firing at us, but it was a truly awful ride. Worst ride of my life. The Hubs and I agree: the only good thing about it is that we never have to do it again!) But cycling is different: the ride is a joy in and of itself. A workout for the sole purpose of a workout is a different frame of mind for me.

It's supposed to be a little warmer tomorrow, but still in the mid-20's. If my knees are up to it, I may try to go for a short run. Last week, I ran two miles on a treadmill. I think I'd rather risk frostbite than go for another two mile run on a treadmill.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CLEARNIGHTSKY 12/20/2013 10:11PM

    YOU CAN DO IT. I know you're going to be able to do push-ups again AND to do unassisted pull-ups. Keep on keepin'on.

emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
MISSG180 12/11/2013 4:53PM

    I keep thinking I should get back to the gym, even if it's just for the lifting. I am being such a slug about it, though. My annual membership lapses at the end of December, and if I don't get there soon and start going regularly I can't really justify renewing it.

Report Inappropriate Comment
JOYCRN 12/10/2013 4:59AM

    Running outside in cold weather is awesome! As long as it is not slippery (I spent 6 weeks in a cast after running on a dirt road in the snow once). You will warm up in 10 minutes and really feel great because you are outside. Last year I avoided the treadmill the whole winter since it didn't snow much (but I usually only run once or twice a week) emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
JEANINNEWCASTLE 12/10/2013 1:25AM

  emoticon emoticon emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment


First Page  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Last Page