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Day 72 of 100 Days of Weight Loss

Tuesday, January 06, 2009

Day 72 with 28 days to go

Sneak Eating
Do you eat perfectly around others but creep off alone to finish off the last of the cookies or the leftover dessert? Maybe you keep a secret stash of your favorite candy so you can nibble it when no one is around. You know that sneak eating can totally ruin your diet, you may still be struggling with it on a daily basis.

You try to tell yourself that sneaking food doesn't matter that much, or maybe you don't have control over yourself. But behind this secret lies a huge range of emotions such as anger, resentment and fear.

Do you feel embarrassed or ashamed to be seen eating certain foods because of your weight? If you've told people that you're on a diet, you probably don't want them to see you slipping up on your plan.

Maybe you're tired of hearing your mother's negative comments about your weight. Maybe you're afraid that your spouse will criticize you for eating certain foods. Maybe you just want to escape the prying eyes of the "diet police."

Who are you really punishing?
If you feel pressured to follow your diet perfectly, you may attempt to punish other people by eating when they can't see you. If you're subjected to constant monitoring or criticism from family members, you might secretly think, "I'll show you! There's no way you can control me now." You always end up punishing the wrong person. When you sneak food and overeat, you're the one who gains weight or feels bloated and miserable.

Eat in the presence of others
To overcome patterns of sneak eating, consider making a policy that you'll always eat sweets or favorite foods in the presence of at least one other person.
You won't be able to dig into an entire carton of ice cream or finish off the rest of the chocolates that are leftover from some holiday without someone else watching you.

To reinforce your decision, let others know your plans not to eat certain foods in private, then ask for their support. Remind them that you'll be using tools such as the first two bites and savoring. When you eat in their presence, ask them to offer you encouragement rather than criticism.

Today
...make a list of foods as well as the situations that might prompt you to sneak out.

...what are you saying to others when you sneak food? Are you secretly expressing anger or a need for control? In your notebook, write down some of the emotional needs you might be solving by sneaking food.

...add a few thought about the ways people act when you don't follow your diet perfectly. Notice whether you react with fear, anger, resentment, or some other emotions.
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

DAISYBILL 9/28/2009 10:49AM

    Having support to keep on program is wonderful , as we see here on Spark. We are like-minded. I like to think that even if no one is watching that I can say no to the "other me" that is saying it is ok to sneak eat. Relaxing about the whole diet issue is another thing, It sounds like you are putting a lot of pressure on yourself to perform a certain way and you did answer your own questions of who is in charge here..... you. The opinion you have of yourself is much, much, much more important than the opinion of the "watching eyes"... no matter who they belong to. emoticon

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Day 1 of the NEW YOU Bootcamp

Sunday, January 04, 2009

Whew! That kickboxing was a little rough! I am very happy it was only 10 and thankfully that included the strtches. I LOVE LOVE LOVE the stretches! I haven't done much in the way of exercise over the holidays and man oh man can I tell it! I must get in shape, I must get in shape, I must get in shape!
I remember my new motto: I am a perfect size 6!
Well, I am not there YET!!!!

My cardio was 30 minutes of "Walk Away the Pounds"

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

BONNIEBELLE2 1/7/2009 12:24PM

    Pat, I'm doing the Bootcamp challenge too! I have gotten a little behind though and need to catch up. What a great idea to blog about the challenge! Here's to that size 6 in our future!
Hugs,
Bonnie

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KRZYKAT3 1/6/2009 3:15PM

    WAy to go! I need to get in line on Bootcamp myself. Better go add to my goals!

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DOWNPORT 1/6/2009 9:09AM

    What a great start! I can see that size 6 on the horizon! Good luck, keep it up! Carole emoticon

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Day 71 of 100 days of Weight Loss

Sunday, January 04, 2009

Day 71 with 29 days to go

It's Too Hard!
Every few months we decide we're going to lose weight. We gear up by telling ourselves that "This time I will stick to my diet perfectly, walk every day and never eat when I'm NOT hungry." On the chosen day, which is usually Monday, we begin weighing and measuring food, writing on our journal, tracking food and exercises. Everything is going smoothly til an unexpected event comes along. We struggle to stay on the plan. Demands put on us from family, work, even the dog make every day a challenge. Finally, we want to give up on the diet because "It's just too hard, I can't keep up with it."

That's not a good reason to give up! You need to learn how to face the tough times without allowing them to pull you off track.

I Can Do Hard Things
Think about it, you have done many hard things in your life, giving birth, working at a job you don't particularly like, moving to a new city, cleaning the house -- you CAN do hard things! Instead of caving in on your food program because you think it's too hard, buck up and tell yourself: "Of course it's hard, but I've done a lot of difficult things in my life and this isn't any different. I know what I have to do, and I can do it -- I can do hard things."

Be Willing To Do The Work
There's no way to avoid it -- losing weight takes a lot of effort. You have to plan your meals, track what you eat and avoid temptations. Sometimes you have to make difficult decisions, tackle challenges, and manage people or situations that feel extremely difficult. If you can find the courage and the focus to put up with the hard parts, you'll reach the goals you want so badly.

Today
... In your notebook, write, "I can do hard things."

...make a list of hard things you've done in the past. Remind yourself that you are a strong person.

...renew your commitment to doing the work that's involved in this project. Tell yourself that you can do hard things, including staying on your diet and your exercise plan. Then DO IT.


  


Day 68, 69 & 70 of 100 Days of Weight Loss

Friday, January 02, 2009

Day 68 with 32 days to go

I had a "pause"
As you work on changing your dieting vocabulary, here's another way to eliminate saying, "I blew it." If you slip up and eat something that's not on your plan, skip beating yourself up with harsh, punishing words. Instead, label the incident as a PAUSE in your diet. This kind, nonjudgmental word doesn't make any references to your personality or your ability to accomplish a goal. It allows you to take a break in your efforts, then rest and regroup.

Having a pause
On a hike up the mountain, you stop to sit down on a rock, take a sip of water and rest. You wouldn't berate yourself for doing that, or punish yourself by saying "I blew the hike, now I have to go back 100 yards and walk that part over again." Noooo way, you just rest, sip your water, and continue on your journey. That was a PAUSE.

Erase the board
If you slip up on your program, just say "I had a brief pause, but now I'm back on track." You don't have to say another word. That takes care of it. No dwelling on it, move on and move forward.

Okay let's say you gorged yourself on 10 cookies instead of 2 that you planned to eat. Picture in your mind, a bit white erasable board and mentally write on it, "I ate 10 cookies."
OK you ate 10 cookies, you acknowledged it. Now mentally erase it off the board. Get on with your life.

Today
...Next time you're tempted to say "I blew it", stop yourself immediately, instead label your slipup as a pause.

...Decide how you will bounce back from an eating pause. Write down a short plan that includes what you'll say to yourself as well as what you'll do next.

...Whenever you slip up, instead of dwelling on it, practice the skill of "erasing the board". Think about how you can learn from a pause rather than finding ways to punish yourself.


Day 69 with 31 days to go

No Cheating Allowed
"I cheated big time on my diet today." (sounds a lot like Weight Watchers to me). Does that phrase sound familiar? You've heard variations of that line. The word "CHEAT" makes it sound like you believe the diet is in charge. You label yourself in a way that gives away your power. If you're strong, you wouldn't cheat on your program.

No More Cheating
Truth is -- YOU CAN'T CHEAT WITH FOOD! It's impossible. The word "Cheat" refers to something illegal or immoral and food is neither of those. You don't have some kind of moral or character defect just because you ate a friggin cookie.
Stop using that word completely. Instead, use the words CHOOSE OR CHOICE to describe your behavior.
You make dozens of choices in life every day. How you eat is just one of them. You choose things such as what time to get up, whether to go to work, how to talk to the people around you, what to wear...etc. You might not like all your options but the choices you make determine the outcomes of your day.
As far as eating, every morsel that goes into your mouth is put there by choice. Sometimes you make healthy choices, sometimes lousy ones. In time all these choices affect your outcomes especially when it comes to whether or not you lose weight.

Making Health Choices
Instead of saying you cheated on your diet, admit to yourself that every time you reach for food, you're making choices. IF you eat a cookie that wasn't on your plan, say "I CHOSE to EAT A COOKIE today." Maybe you wish you hadn't done that but either way you made a choice about eating it.
Don't try to excuse your behavior by blaming lack of willpower or discipline. You are in charge of your own choices. Take responsibility for the decisions you make around food. When you talk about your actions, describe them in ways that maintain your personal power.

Today
... talk to someone about your diet plan, use the word CHOICE several times to describe your actions. Notice how that feels.

...In your journal or blog, record at least three choices you made around food today.

...If you make a weak or poor choice, figure out how to describe it without using negative words such as CHEAT


Day 70 with 30 days to go

No good or bad
"I started the day being so good but then someone brought a birthday cake to the office and I was really bad. Have you ever described your eating habit like that?

Eating is not a moral issue so you can't apply behavioral codes to what you do with food. Eating cookies or potato chips (both my weaknesses) doesn't make a person bad. It's impossible to be "GOOD" or "BAD" with eating. So stop using those words to describe yourself on your food intake.

Who said it was bad?
Who decided that a carrot was good and a brownie was bad? We measure dieting efforts against a list of foods that are either allowed or not allowed. Then you chastise yourself for eating from the no-no list.

We have to break the habit of calling ourselves good or bad. Again, refer to your weight loss plan as your eating choices. You can say " I made a good choice this morning by eating a healthy breakfast. This afternoon I made a poorer choice when I ate three brownies." Each of your actions is a CHOICE, so you can't punish yourself and say you were bad.

Take back your power around food by changing your language, acknowledge you are personally responsible for your decisions about what you eat.

Today
...Write a sentence or two about the choices you made today

...Notice how often you hear other people use words like, cheating, good and bad while discussing diet efforts. When you hear someone use those terms, mentally rewrite the sentences in a way that refers to choices in life.

...Teach this concept to a friend or diet buddy. Catch the times when either of you slips up by saying cheat, good or bad to describe eating patterns or food intake. Have a contest and designate the person who says these phrases the fewest times as the winner.


  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

GCHUNG 1/2/2009 9:10PM

    You are so good !! I love how you move to the positive. So often we use the negative as an excuse to give up. But you're absolutely correct - take a breath and keep on moving - Keep it up!

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Day 67 & 68 of 100 Days of weight Loss

Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Day 67 with 33 days to go

Never say "I Blew It"

One of the most common dieting phrases is "I've already blown it, so I might as well go ahead and eat the rest." Each time you say I blew it, you reinforce your sense of failure and disappointment with not staying on your plan. You also give yourself permission to follow a minor slipup with a major eating binge.

You might even take it a bit further and plan more damage. If you go to the ice cream shop and order a hot fudge sundae, when asked if she wanted whipped cream and nuts, she said, "why not, I'm blowing it anyway so I might as well go all the way."

When you think you've "blown it" you may decide to punish yourself by eating more. You feel bloated and miserable and you still make yourself pay by pushing in more food which makes you feel worse.

Today
...resolve that you'll never again describe your eating by saying the words "I blew it."

...Invent some new phrases that acknowledge your eating struggle but at the same time encourage you to move forward. Consider using statements such as, "that was minor, so I need to keep it that way."

...Record your favorite phrases in your notebook and memorize them so you can use them whenever you have a slipup.
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Day 68 with 32 days to go

I had a "pause"
As you work on changing your dieting vocabulary, here's another way to eliminate saying, "I blew it." If you slip up and eat something that's not on your plan, skip beating yourself up with harsh, punishing words. Instead, label the incident as a PAUSE in your diet. This kind, nonjudgmental word doesn't make any references to your personality or your ability to accomplish a goal. It allows you to take a break in your efforts, then rest and regroup.

Having a pause
On a hike up the mountain, you stop to sit down on a rock, take a sip of water and rest. You wouldn't berate yourself for doing that, or punish yourself by saying "I blew the hike, now I have to go back 100 yards and walk that part over again." Noooo way, you just rest, sip your water, and continue on your journey. That was a PAUSE.

Erase the board
If you slip up on your program, just say "I had a brief pause, but now I'm back on track." You don't have to say another word. That takes care of it. No dwelling on it, move on and move forward.

Okay let's say you gorged yourself on 10 cookies instead of 2 that you planned to eat. Picture in your mind, a bit white erasable board and mentally write on it, "I ate 10 cookies."
OK you ate 10 cookies, you acknowledged it. Now mentally erase it off the board. Get on with your life.

Today
...Next time you're tempted to say "I blew it", stop yourself immediately, instead label your slipup as a pause.

...Decide how you will bounce back from an eating pause. Write down a short plan that includes what you'll say to yourself as well as what you'll do next.

...Whenever you slip up, instead of dwelling on it, practice the skill of "erasing the board". Think about how you can learn from a pause rather than finding ways to punish yourself.


  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

BRANDI-JAN 12/31/2008 7:49PM

    I love that "PAUSE THING" it changes yoru whole mindset, thanks, hopefully everyone else will read it and we can all move on after pausing

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