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high monounsaturated fat diet



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DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,431
6/26/13 2:31 P

You asked "if this is an improvement".
Honestly, there is no research to support the use of a raw diet. In fact it may be so restrictive that you are missing out on needed nutrients.

A vegetarian and vegan diet can be healthy. However, as a Registered Dietitian I do not encourage the use of a raw diet.

Becky
SP Registered Dietitian Nutritionist



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/26/13 11:04 A

I've been consulting cookbooks and websites, and I've added more variety to my diet:

4:00- 1 fruit (pineapple or banana), broccoli.
7:00- 2 fruits (apple, banana, or grapes), hot cereal, soy milk (2 cups).
10:00- 1 vegetable (carrots or spinach), peanuts (2 scoops), bread (1 piece).
1:00- 1 vegetable (carrots or spinach), almonds (2 scoops), bread (1 piece).
4:00- 1 vegetable (carrots or spinach), cashews (2 scoops), bread (1 piece).
7:00- soy milk (1 cup).

Fat still makes up about 41% of my diet, but I'm adding more vegetables whenever possible to try to lower this.

I'd also like to find another raw, vegan protein source so I'm not eating so many nuts. This will cut down on my fat intake.

Well, is this an improvement? Is there anything else I can do to improve my diet?

Thanks to everyone for your feedback.



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,431
6/10/13 11:22 A

Do you have several vegan cookbooks---this is really going to be the most helpful.
I could tell you to use certain products like tofu, tempeh, beans, lentils, legumes, whole grains, quinoa....but you will still need good recipes to now how to prepare them.

You may also want to join a vegan Sparkteam---they will be very helpful with sharing their favorities. Let me know if you need the steps to do this.

Becky



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/10/13 11:16 A

good morning,

in the interest of getting more variety in my diet, i've added cucumbers, spinach, strawberries, and blueberries, and i'm also taking a multivitamin.

any suggestions for a vegan protein source to substitute for some of my peanuts?

oh, and thank you, everyone, for your assistance.



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/8/13 5:53 P

oh, and my soy milk is fortified with vitamin b12.



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/8/13 5:40 P

wow. i didn't expect anyone to suggest i have an eating disorder. and here i thought i was super-healthy.

for what it's worth, bananas, peppers, and carrots have vitamin b6.

i have some resources, so i'll see what i can do to get more variety.

so i guess my original question isn't the real issue, huh? emoticon



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,431
6/8/13 5:14 P

I would encourage you to go to your library and check out some cookbooks for vegan recipes---you need more variety in your diet. Your meal plans are way to restrictive which is throwing you into an unhealth breakdown of protein-fat-carbs and also you are missing out on key nutrients.

Sparkpeople also has a vegan book/cookbook that I think would really help with your meal planning and recipe ideas:

www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search
-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=sparkpeopl
e%2C+vegan


Becky
SP Registered Dietitian Nutritionist



ANARIE
Posts: 12,348
6/8/13 4:29 P

The vast majority of your calories are coming from two closely related foods-- peanuts and soy. Any time you eat one type of food almost exclusively, you're missing out on certain nutrients. In your case, it looks like your vitamin B counts are at almost zero, which will lead to pernicious anemia at some point if you continue. (You need B vitamins, especially B12, to create red blood cells. If you've eaten meat in the past, your body has some B12 stored, so the symptoms might not start for months or even years, but eventually you'll get sick.)

To be honest, if you eat this same limited menu day after day, that's not a diet. That's an eating disorder. If this has been going on for a while or if you feel like you HAVE to do it, it would be a good idea to find an ED counselor. If this is a new idea and you're just contemplating it because it seems easy, then I'd recommend finding a vegan menu plan created by a registered dietitian and following that until you learn the tricks of being a healthy vegan, or see a doctor for supplements (second best option.) Being vegetarian isn't all that complicated, but being vegan takes lots of education. Humans are designed to eat at least some animal food. We don't need meat, but if you also eliminate eggs and dairy, your diet doesn't provide all the nutrients you need to live.



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
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Posts: 10
6/8/13 4:05 P

my goals are to follow a vegan diet (after watching "forks over knives"), have a consistent energy level throughout the day, and be as healthy as possible.



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,431
6/8/13 3:08 P

Yes, it is a little strange and very restirctive.
Why are you following this?? What is your goal?
Becky



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/8/13 1:40 P

yes, one of my primary sources of protein, calories, and monounsaturated fat is peanuts.

of all the strange diets i've put together, this is one of the stranger ones:

5:00 a.m. (pre-exercise snack)- banana, 3 vegetables.
7:00 a.m. (breakfast)- soy milk (2 cups), banana, apple, hot cereal.
10:00 a.m. (snack?)- bread (1 piece), peanuts (2 scoops), baby carrots.
1:00 p.m. (lunch?)- bread (1 piece), peanuts (2 scoops), baby carrots.
4:00 p.m. (dinner?)- bread (1 piece), peanuts (2 scoops), baby carrots.
7:00 p.m. (bedtime snack)- soy milk (1 cup).

as you can see, i eat about every three hours, so my meals don't fit neatly into the "breakfast/lunch/dinner" model.

pretty strange, huh? emoticon



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,431
6/8/13 11:59 A

Could a high fat intake bring about health problems (even if from healthier monounsaturated fat sources)???.
Maybe, Maybe not. The upper fat intake recommendation for overall health, is no more than 35% of one's calories coming from fat. So I must ask, why is yours so high? Especially with you being vegan (this rules out fat in milk, cheese, meat, eggs, etc). Are you adding high fat foods as some sort of supplement? Your nutrition tracker is not public, so I can not see your food choices. Let me know if you need the steps to do this. I am somewhat confused as to "what" you are doing? Can you share more?

Typically a vegan diet is higher in carbs (60-65% of calories)---since carb foods are being used to meet protein needs (grains, beans, legumes, etc). Are you using mostly nuts/seeds?

Becky

Edited by: DIETITIANBECKY at: 6/8/2013 (12:01)


MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/7/13 3:31 P

yes, that's correct. here's the breakdown:

about 2200 total calories
protein- 88 grams/352 calories = 16%
fat- 102 grams/918 calories = 41.6%
carbohydrates- 234 grams/935 calories = 42.4%



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,431
6/7/13 3:12 P

Hi I'm Becky the Registered Dietitian with Sparkpeople.
I'm wanting to check to make sure the numbers you are sharing are accurate.
If you are taking in 90 grams of protein and this is 16% of your total calorie intake---then you are consuming 2,250 calories daily. Is this the correct calorie amount that you are currently eating???

Becky



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/7/13 2:22 P

the diet is one i created myself. i'm getting about 90 grams of protein a day, which i think is enough.

it sounds like you think i'm getting too much fat. what consequences could there be if i continue on this diet?

thank you for your reply!



SPARK_COACH_JEN
Posts: 55,216
6/7/13 2:18 P

Is this a diet you created yourself, or is it something prescribed by your doctor? Your protein sounds a little low, so you might consider swapping out some of the higher fat foods for higher protein options.

Coach Jen



MDT1349
SparkPoints: (30)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 10
6/7/13 11:28 A

i'm currently on a vegan diet that is 16% protein, 42% fat, and 42% carbohydrates. prior to this my fat has never been above 28%. could a diet of 42% (almost entirely monounsaturated) fat cause any health problems?



 
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