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heart health misinformation



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KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/5/13 3:00 P

I definitely am obsessed with food. But I'm not afraid to eat what I want in moderation. I try to eat mostly organic or whole foods, but if I go out to eat I just enjoy myself or if I'm in the mood for lets say a donut, I'll have 3 munchkins from dunkin donuts. I just try and do it in moderation. I'm just very interested in food and the way it affects the mind and body. I think food can either be the greatest medicine or the worst poison depending on how you treat it. I'm even considering going back to school to study nutrition or dietetics. I'm still looking into it and trying to decide if it's worth the money to go back to school. I already have a degree that I've never really used and I'd have to pretty much start over since I have a BFA and what I'd really need is a BS. I just feel strongly about nutrition and fitness and I want to be informed for myself and maybe to be able to help other's one day.



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
3/5/13 1:01 P

200 carbs in a 2,000 calorie diet is within Spark's ranges.

My calorie range is 1780-2130 and 200 is my minimum for carbs.



SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (122,192)
Fitness Minutes: (32,485)
Posts: 21,077
3/5/13 1:23 A

SP isn't as prescriptive as that re carb recommendations - they actually provide a range (not a specific single number) and it is quite a considerable range.

I am wondering if you could be a little obsessed with possible negatives of food? You may find that if you spend a lot of time worrying about what you MIGHT be eating, you could end up worse off with your health (including emotional) than if you just ate some of it. Most things in moderation is the key - just make sure that you buy from reputable places.

Kris



KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/5/13 1:16 A

you're probably right about it taking a while for new studies to make it to the main stream UNIDENT. I think I found an article that explains the anti-inflammatory carb breakdown a little better for me. This article also suggests 200 or less carbs for a woman with a 2000 calorie diet as opposed to the SP suggested 275 on a suggested 1680 calorie diet. www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02995/Dr-Weil-Anti
-Inflammatory-Food-Pyramid.html
www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02012/anti-inflamm
atory-diet




KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/5/13 1:08 A

I think I'm going to watch forks over knives next. I have heard of that.I try not to eat a lot of chicken and beef if I can help it, because as you stated who knows what's in it these days. I don't feel completely comfortable when it isn't organic (although I do cave and eat whatever I can get my hands on sometimes) and even with organics we have to be careful we aren't being swindled. When I'm going hardcore on my non-gmo dedication I tend to stick with eggs, cheese, and tofu...which are cheaper to get organic than beef and chicken. I also eat wild salmon and tuna. If I have the extra money to buy properly raised and fed chicken, beef and pork, I do enjoy it. I wish it didn't take so much thought and energy to pick out food at the grocery store!



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
3/4/13 10:41 P

Science changes, but slowly.

It takes a vast amount of overwhelming evidence to change the current scientific thinking on any topic, including healthy dietary needs in the average adult.

Let's say current thinking is X. A researcher discovers that actually, Y is more true given their studies.

Nobody adopts that yet. We wait for a few more researchers to also get Y. And preferably some to confirm if X is still true.

When there's an overwhelming confirmation that X is not as true as we once thought and Y more often better predicts results, then the scientific thinking does change, and most experts in the field start promoting Y.

But it never happens from just a few studies, or any one breakthrough. It takes years and years - because nobody wants to get it too wrong.

As you're probably aware, there are studies out there and dietary research that prove pretty much everything. Anything you can think of, someone's proved it. So we need bulk evidence before "most professionals" will update their thinking.

Eg Spark has recently changed the percentages recommended as a reflection that a higher protein intake helps with diet needs and losing weight. That change probably wasn't undertaken lightly, and would have been the result of reviewing hundreds of studies confirming that that was the case.



NEWT58
SparkPoints: (2,525)
Fitness Minutes: (5,443)
Posts: 36
3/4/13 9:32 P

If your in to health documentaries, I liked "Forks over Knives". I don't think meat is a bad thing per see, but the problem is all the things that tend to be concentrated in meats. If you were eating meat a hundred years ago all you would have to worry about is parasites. Now we have hormones, and Mercury in fish. GMO's we won't know about the effects for years. When I had my own ranch, I would raise my own angus cows and chickens for consumption. I knew what went into them. I would never buy meat that has been to the feedlot. Guess where you get your hamburger?
But I don't want to be negative. I just went to the store and the only meat we came home with was wild salmon and tuna (also wild) The fruit and veges thing is continuing to dominate our diet and the meat is continuing to get smaller. You guys are showing me the way.
MD's are just like anyone else. Some are into this stuff and up to date, others are not. Some of my colleagues still smoke, but most are dead by now (30 years ago it was a lot more common)

Edited by: NEWT58 at: 3/4/2013 (21:50)


KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/4/13 9:14 P

The meat thing confuses me too! It seems like as long as you have a lower carb intake you can safely eat more meat. The only constants I feel like I can rely on is fruits, vegetables and water are A-OK. I don't even know where to begin with the milk thing. I'm still trying to understand the carb/animal fat juggling act. lol. I'll tackle milk next!



KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/4/13 9:09 P

Scary!



KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/4/13 9:08 P

You're so right about looking into too many diets, makes my head spin just thinking about it. I just try to stick to whole foods as much as possible and avoid processed and GMO. I usually wind up naturally around 150 for carbs, so I guess I shouldn't worry too much. I actually lowered the carb counting feature to a max of 175.



KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/4/13 9:03 P

I definitely agree that SP is encouraging health, wellness and balance. I love the site and am on it everyday. Besides I have the ability to change the nutrient settings to whatever I'd like. I love the food tracker. It's just that if there is misinformation from the government and science that is self serving, perhaps some of what these reputable dieticians have been led to believe isn't really correct. I mean here is a link to a heart surgeon admitting he was misinformed about the subject: http://www.sott.net/article/242516-Heart-S
urgeon-Speaks-Out-On-What-Really-Cause
s-Heart-Disease
I mean it's just scary...



YOJULEZ
SparkPoints: (15,605)
Fitness Minutes: (120)
Posts: 2,171
3/4/13 9:03 P

KPILVER, that's why SP gives RANGES. Your range might go up to 300, but that doesn't mean you have to eat that much. I know my range is 162-291 and I'm usually hovering around 200 or less.... unless I ate bread and sweets all day long (forgoing other things) I don't think I could ever make it up to 291. My fat range is 32-70 and I tend to be on the high end of that. Protein is 60-157 and I usually eat 95-120. So, the point is, you have to look at the suggested ranges SP gives, and figure out what works for you, while staying within your calorie ranges.

Also, if you tried to follow every thing you see in every food/diet/nutrition documentary that's out there, you wouldn't be able to eat anything.



KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/4/13 8:55 P

Yes, you're right, the inflammation is not "just" caused by carbs. The 3 major causes I generally see listed are smoking, excess carbohydrates and stress. I don't have any heart related issues (and I don't want any). I generally stay away from simple carbs and get most of my carbs from whole grains, fruits and veggies. I'm just not sure I should be eating nearly 300 carbs a day as suggested and if so how many of those carbs should really come from grains? Also, I'm not sure anymore that limiting animal fat intake is necessarily the best course of action either. I'm thoroughly confused after I recently watched a documentary called "Fat Head", in it the main character (Tom Naughton) points out that the guidelines set forth by the USDA for carbohydrate consumption are driven more by the financial implications of selling agricultural products. Tom also puts the theory that eating a lot of cholesterol causes high cholesterol to the test by eating a high fat, high protein diet without simple carbs and his bad cholesterol levels actually dropped! I just don't want to be limiting fat and replacing it with carbs if I should be doing the opposite.



CORTNEY-LEE
SparkPoints: (50,467)
Fitness Minutes: (43,514)
Posts: 3,010
3/4/13 12:01 P

I think also that genetics plays a very important role. Sometimes, it doesn't matter what you eat, drink, or do.

Depressing, but true



NEWT58
SparkPoints: (2,525)
Fitness Minutes: (5,443)
Posts: 36
3/4/13 11:57 A

The body's chronic inflammatory state is indeed a fascinating topic and is probably responsible for a whole host of disorders, including heart disease, dementia, joint disease and many others. I was amazed at a recent show I saw that advocated only whole vegetarian foods and they had managed to cut indicators of chronic inflammation in half. I think this will be the focus of much health research in the future.
In the meantime, what should we do?
I really like the advice on this site. Dairy is probably not as good as we once thought it was. I really believe most of fast food is toxic. Eat meat sparingly. I am trying to let it be only a fraction of my diet, and that is often fish or chicken.
As they say on the site- be moderate. And cook your own fresh food.
Newt, MD.



MISSRUTH
Posts: 3,292
3/4/13 8:17 A

What I've seen, about carbs and heart health-- it's not carbs in general, it's SIMPLE carbs, refined carbs. White flour, sugar, white rice. And Spark is totally in line with that.

You will find that on any reputable site, when they talk about what you should do to reduce your risk of cancer or heart disease or whatever, the list is usually the same. Stop smoking. If you won't stop drinking, at least do it in moderation (less than one drink a day, for women). Eat a healthy diet (whole grains, lean meat, lots of vegetables and fruit). Get some regular exercise. Maintain a healthy weight.

Beyond that, if you had some sort of medical problem, your own physician would be the one to guide you on specifics.





SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (122,192)
Fitness Minutes: (32,485)
Posts: 21,077
3/4/13 12:50 A

I agree with UNIDENT.

What SP is doing is encouraging us to eat a HEALTHY, BALANCED diet - carbs are an important part of that. The advice is from well qualified Dietitians, whom I trust implicitly.

The other thing is that Heart Disease isn't JUST caused by "carbs" - there are many other causes and probably some equally as bad. My husband is a prime example. His cholesterol was excellent (low-normal) - and didn't have Diabetes. He was very physically active - not over-weight - ate a very healthy, balanced diet - but died after his 4th heart attack. The cause? He was a heavy smoker who was unable to give it up!

Kris



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
3/3/13 10:36 P

I think Sparkpeople's dietary guidelines are primarily about fat loss, not heart health.

That hasn't changed.



KPILVER
SparkPoints: (6,799)
Fitness Minutes: (5,677)
Posts: 17
3/3/13 9:43 P

With all the new findings about what really causes heart disease do you think sparkpeoples dietary guidelines might need updating? We have been previously misled into thinking it is caused by eating too much fat. It's been shown that heart disease is a result of consuming too many carbohydrates which results in inflammation. What do you think?



 
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