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MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,845
5/4/13 10:18 A

The need for water during exercise is very much dependent on the circumstances and the environment.

It's worth reading
in detail.

But to paraphrase, for most workouts under 60 minutes, you probably don't need to drink anything. For a short intense workout where you really are 'balls to the wall', you shouldn't need to drink. If you are working out for long enough that you need to drink, then you have time to drink.

Also, be guided by the conditions. In cool conditions you may not need to drink anything, but you may need to drink quite a bit if the weather is hot and/or humid.

Drinking 8 oz every 20 minutes may be necessary in some very warm conditions, but is NOT necessary in most other conditions. Incidentally, I read recently (can't remember where) that there is no recorded instance of anyone dying of dehydration in a race, but there are several deaths from Exercise-associated Hyponatremia (basically where essential body salts get diluted too much from excessive water intake).


The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.
5/2/13 12:09 P

Having a good part of my adult life working in hot environments I learned that sipping water will not really hydrate. When I drink water it is normally a quart at a time if I am sweating heavily. I hydrate before a long workout of running or cycling by taking in a quart of water. When you are thirsty you are 1% dehydrated not 30% which is not life threatening. At 30% you will have additional symptoms far beyond just feeling thirsty. There is no clinical study which indicates that you need 8 cups (64 ounces) of water a day since all of the food you consume contains some water. Carrying a bottle or other container of water is more a habit than something which is necessary for good health. Sipping water will only moisten your mouth not slake your thirst so sip water if you have dry mouth when working out but do not assume you are rehydrating.

The most reliable indicator of your level of hydration or dehydration is the colour of your urine according to the Mayo Clinic.

It is called WORK-ing out for a reason.

I said getting fit was simple, I did not say it was easy.

Cardio burns calories, strength work burns fat.

Eat well to lose weight, exercise to get fit

You can not build a six pack using twelve packs

Often when we seek a magic bullet for fitness we end up shooting ourselves in the foot.

"I think calories are little germs in food that all moms are afraid of" Dennis the Menace

RIVETPA Posts: 1,177
5/2/13 11:23 A

I take a few sips between exercises, or whenever I have a chance but certainly not when I'm runing - I don't carry anything except my Sony MP3 player and keys.

So yeah - I don't take the requirement to hydrate too seriously.

SIMONEKP Posts: 2,607
5/2/13 11:01 A

They don't mean drink it every 15-20 minutes. Drink it after and take sips during. For example, I usually do 60 mins. I might drink 1 cup during the 60 minutes by gulping a few sips. At the end of the workout, I am tired and thirsty so drinking another 3 cups is easy. My water bottles holds 4 cups.


"Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish." - John Quincy Adams

No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch!
Source: unknown

MIRANDAFRM2 Posts: 290
5/2/13 10:40 A

I just drink when I feel thirsty when I workout. I don't monitor it that closely. I think if you feel hydrated you are good. I do need more in the morning when I work out compared to the afternoon, I just listen to my body.

MPLANE37 SparkPoints: (65,241)
Fitness Minutes: (35,097)
Posts: 2,167
5/2/13 9:28 A

I don't think you have to drink every 15-20 minutes, especially in short workouts. I do HIIT for half an hour, and drink only after the workout. On the other hand, when I run a 10K I do sip water, especially in the second half; if I am on a mountain bike trip of 5 hours, I probably drink more frequently than every 15-20 minutes, especially after the first hour.

I think the idea is to know the rate at which the water is lost so that one takes the necessary precautions before the amount of water becomes an issue.

Edited by: MPLANE37 at: 5/2/2013 (09:29)
``Don't break the chain." -Jerry Seinfeld
``Moments of silence are part of the music." -Anonymous
LEC358 SparkPoints: (11,126)
Fitness Minutes: (6,555)
Posts: 2,741
5/2/13 8:41 A

Depends on what the workout is. When I'm running, I carry water with me and take a swig or 2 every 5 minutes or so. When I fence, I drink in between bouts (they never last longer than 15 mins) before starting the next one. During strength training, it usually a couple of gulps as I switch exercises.

The overall point is to get as much water as you need, the method/timing doesn't really matter. Just remember that by the time that you feel thirsty, you're already operating at 30% below your optimal hydration level.

PSCHIAVONE2 SparkPoints: (18,903)
Fitness Minutes: (12,489)
Posts: 520
5/2/13 8:26 A

Ok, who came up with the notion that you need to drink 8oz of water every 15 to 20 minutes during a workout? I tried and it is impossible. I try to hydrate before I start and then right after I am finished. How do you drink anything when you are balls to the wall in a workout?

Weight is the result of what you have been doing for the past week.
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