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NYXWOLFWALKER
SparkPoints: (136,956)
Fitness Minutes: (143,505)
Posts: 14,821
1/13/13 6:26 P

no idea about the chinese place you ate at but I know my local one I order the food as I like it made and the make it to order - I wont it made with water its made with water, i wont sauce of the side its on the side.

Portion's for the local place we go to are aimed at two people for a small and four people for a large and regular is aimed at two to three people (two comfortable meal serving three means room for extra so to speak).

N and I use to eat at our local Chinese place weekly when our budget allowed for it, we mostly eat there now on special occasions or when they have a special going that allows us to afford to eat there (which isn't often) when we do I get my normal Small Vegan Lo Main (Chinese greens, mixed veggies and bean spouts) made in water with a small steamed rice (small rice = 1 cup for them, so means I might eat half of it and N the other half or we might not even get though half combined) and N will get hir standard Sweet and Sour Breaded Chicken (aka chicken balls) with the sauce on the side.

I saw enjoy it on occasion, knowing that you might have a higher then normal intake for the day - other wise make it at home and tailer it to your needs as possible to do so.



NIRERIN
Posts: 11,761
1/13/13 5:45 P

i think the first thing to remember about chinese food is that it is served family style. which means that that single order of chinese is meant to serve two to four people. pf chang's has slightly smaller portions than the local take out chinese, but the principle is the same. when you order an order of the scallops, that's meant to be shared between you and at least one other person, with perhaps an added side. i mean, at my local take out place if i place an order for ma po tofu it comes in a quart container. yes, a quart container and that doesn't include the 22oz standard take out box that comes full of rice. so without the rice it does clock in around 2000 cals, but you still have to figure that you're talking about four generous portions clocking in at 2000 cals. what i do when i get chinese is i never eat more than 1/4 to 1/5 of it the first time i see it. then i make my leftovers serve me four times and i load up each portion with additional veggies. pf chang's i'd probably up that to about 1/3 to 1/2 for the initial eating and then split my leftovers in two portions. and so by eating somewhere near actual portions of food [instead of three or four] it really helps make it fit in easier.
i mean, 200 cals for a cup of soup isn't an awful number, but if you eat five portions of it at once, it is going to be 1000 cals. and that's what you're looking at with restaurants. even the fancy places serve you more than one portion of food. and as you go down in price, you tend to go up in portion. so you have to know what portions foods are. at a fancy place you might get a 6oz serving of steak, but a 6oz serving of steak is 1.5-2 servings of steak [a serving being 3-4oz]. a serving of pasta is still a half cup, despite the fact that cheesecake factory will pretty much cook up a half pound of the stuff and plop it on your plate. you have to arm yourself with what portions are, and while it's okay to have more than one portion at a meal, when you're always having four portions of anything it jacks the calories up. so you have to take your knowledge and compare it to what you get. you know that restaurants give you big plates and big portions to make sure you feel you're getting your money's worth. so you have to go in aware of that and aware of sizes and base how much you eat on that, not on by eating what is put in front of you. and that's really hard to do as we eat with our eyes. so you have to train your eyes against overeating.




ONLINEASLLOU
SparkPoints: (44,852)
Fitness Minutes: (32,013)
Posts: 3,624
1/13/13 12:09 P

While Dragonchilde may have been a little blunt ... she is essentially right. You can't expect to eat everything you would LIKE to eat in the same amounts that you did before and get a different result in your weight. If you maintain you old ways of eating and exercise, you will maintain your old weight and fitness.

To make meaningful changes in your weight, shape, fitness level, and overall health ... you need to make meaningful changes in your lifestyle. Most of us find we have to do some combination of the following things to be successful.
1. Eat less unhealthy food -- control your portion sizes
2. Choose the healthier options on a restaurant menu (or in the grocery store)
3. Eat those unhealthy foods less often
4. Learn to cook some of your favorite unhealthy foods so that you can prepare them in healthier ways

It's uusally not smart to try to change all of your habits dramatically and quickly. Just tackle it a little bit at a time. Take baby steps -- and gradually change your lifestyle so that you gradually develop the habit of making healthier choices over time.

It's all about making healthy choices on a day to day basis. For me, I had to give up donuts for breakfast, a piece of pie for dessert at lunch. a cookie as an afternoon snack, and a piece of cake or ice cream in the evening. I can't be healthy if I eat all of those things on a daily basis (the way I would really love to eat). But I can be healthy if I limit myself to one (sometimes 2) of those things each day.

If you want to go out to dinner and eat your favorite things at PFChang's -- that's OK -- but you need to eat VERY light the rest of the day to leave room in your "calorie budget" for it.

Edited by: ONLINEASLLOU at: 1/13/2013 (12:12)


CORTNEY-LEE
SparkPoints: (50,660)
Fitness Minutes: (43,849)
Posts: 3,014
1/13/13 7:56 A

I usually get chicken and broccoli. I don't eat the rice

Recently I tried Pineapple Chicken and it is my new favorite dish.





CARLY241
Posts: 189
1/13/13 7:31 A

Have it rarely. It makes it more special that way as well!



SUNSHINE6442
Posts: 1,761
1/13/13 7:07 A

Wow...DRAGONCHILDE must be having a bad day! You didn't say if you ate fried rice...if you did... the better choice would be brown rice as it digests more slowly,,,and most good chinese restaurants have that choice now. I personally dont like the place as their food is loaded with sodium..add soy sauce and wow..Eating too much salt boosts the production insulin, the hormone that tells the body to store fat. Egg rolls are high in fat.

Beef and brocolli is the best choice for chinese, brown rice or a steamed veggie dish...some place have garlic string beans...a good dish. Wonton soup is also a good choice and even a grilled shrimp dish.

Try Outback... for a change.....

Filet Mignon 250 calories 0 carbs...
6 ounces of sirlion w/ grilled shrimp 550 calories 7 carbs
.....1 cup of Manhattan clam chowder 130 calories 8 Carbs...
1 pork chop 200 calories 0 carbs....
3.5 ounces of red snapper 127 calories 0 carbs

Edited by: SUNSHINE6442 at: 1/13/2013 (07:11)


DRAGONCHILDE
SparkPoints: (56,306)
Fitness Minutes: (14,204)
Posts: 9,583
1/13/13 1:05 A

By not having it as often, and not eating so damn much of it. You don't need to eat the entire takeout box from the chinese place, and going easy on the rice goes a long way to helping. You can also opt for healthier choices, like steamed rice instead of fried, or avoiding the deep fried stuff.



BMS555
SparkPoints: (4,745)
Fitness Minutes: (1,635)
Posts: 24
1/12/13 10:24 P

So my wife and I had PF Changs tonight for dinner because it's our favorite, but I never realized how bad it would hurt my numbers. How can you enjoy the food you love with out hurting your diet?



 
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