Author: Sorting Last Post on Top Message:
MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,287
12/1/11 2:45 A

Firstly, here's why you should strength train. Without ST, up to 25% of your weight loss can come from lost muscle. Muscle burns calories even at rest, and over time, this lost muscle can slow down your ongoing weight loss efforts. Including ST will allow you to maintain your existing muscle mass and ensure that more of your weight loss comes from fat alone (and this leads to more lost inches). Also, ST boosts your metabolism, helping you burn more calories throughout the day.

ST doesn't have to take a lot of time. A very simple routine of compound exercises can give you an all-body workout in just 20-30 minutes. eg:
* squats/lunges
* deadlifts
* planks
* pushups (modified or wall pushups if necessary)
* pull-ups/lat pull downs/dumbbell rows

Also, a set or two of ST can be a good thing to do in a short 'concentration' break, rather than something you necessarily need to focus a big block of time on. (And this also helps avoid the temptation to raid the fridge).

M@L

JONESINATOR Posts: 1,837
11/30/11 11:55 P

If all you do is cardio (even intervals), you'll be skinny fat. By that, you'll be flabby and "squishy", not taut and tight like a muscular form.

Go to stumptuous.com if you're a female (unsure of your gender) and you'll find out very quickly how incredibly taut a muscular body can be for a female.

If male, bodybuilding.com is always a good resource. For women too, as well, but it can be a bit unnerving at first.

I can relate to this personally. I did cardio and diet only for three months in 2007 and got down to 155, my lowest weight ever. But I had a lot of fat on my body and really felt awful. Today, I have no idea what I weigh, but it's not 155 and it's definitely higher than that, but I look far, far better because I've built muscle. There's a difference for men and women, but only in the size of muscles - I know women who can lift more than I can.

MANDIETERRIER1 Posts: 13,745
11/30/11 10:33 P

Could you download your books onto an ipod or something and listen to them while you strength train?

I personally don't like Strength Training, but I know it is the only way to get the figure that I want.

Edited by: MANDIETERRIER1 at: 11/30/2011 (22:34)
TIAGAYEPFA SparkPoints: (77,246)
Fitness Minutes: (103,929)
Posts: 4,974
11/30/11 9:43 P

You could probably cut your cardio to 40 minutes and do 20 minutes of strength training and get same or better results since strength training will help you drop fat and build lean muscle so you'll look smaller faster. And it's such a great feeling to see yourself getting stronger! You can get a lot done in a 20 minute session, especially if you don't take much rest in between sets.

GAMMALEAK Posts: 219
11/30/11 9:34 P

I used to hate exercise of all forms. I didn't like the fact that you have to work hard at it (I'm physically very lazy), and I didn't like the fact that I couldn't do other things I needed or wanted to do while I was exercising.

However, recently I've discovered that I can do some reading for school while on a stationary bike or an elliptical. And although I still have to work hard at it (the intervals on the stationary bike are BRUTAL), I know it's good for me. When my pants fit a little looser this last Monday it was a real motivator!

But for strength training... I just can't seem to get motivated. I spend a good 180 minutes per week doing cardio (three days, 60 minutes each), so I feel out of time and unable to multitask with it like I can with my cardio.

Any tips or suggestions?

Page: 1 of (1)  




Other Fitness and Exercise Topics:

Topics: Last Post:
Hatha Yoga anyone? 9/27/2013 4:36:01 AM
TRX Suspension trainer 10/31/2013 8:50:44 AM
Stair climber vs arc trainer? 10/19/2013 12:30:49 PM
what counts as exercise 10/24/2013 12:05:44 AM
calories burned? 10/5/2013 10:38:26 PM

Diet Resources: exercise programs for senior citizens | exercise routines senior citizens | senior citizen exercise equipment