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SUSAN_FOSTER Posts: 1,228
11/10/13 11:53 A

As others have mentioned, going from a treadmill to outside can be difficult due to having to control your pace vs.setting the machine. When you first get outside, run slow, almost painfully slow. It's better to be consistent and finish your runs slowly than to go too fast and not be able to finish. Get used to controlling your pace over time (months) and then try to pick it up.

RKING10 Posts: 152
11/10/13 9:50 A

Thank you all for your advice and support!

SERGEANTMAJOR Posts: 6,418
11/9/13 10:17 A

You will do more work and get more benefit from running out of doors, it is more demanding. On a treadmill the moving belt removes almost 50% of the effort since it pulls your foot and leg to the rear removing part of the work which out of doors running requires.

Using one of the many beginning running programmes such as Couch to 5 K will give you the necessary boost to help you run out of doors since it requires you to concentrate on what you are doing.

MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,223
11/9/13 5:53 A

There are some differences between running on the treadmill and outside:

* You do get a small assist from the motion of the belt.
* The rubber belt has more 'give' in it than a concrete sidewalk - it can take some adjusting to the additional impact.
* Rather than the machine pacing you, you have to learn to judge your own pace.

You may need a couple of weeks of running outside to adjust to these subtle differences, but as you get used to the differences, it does get easier.

Perhaps map out your intended route on the fitness maps, and pick the distance at intermediate landmarks/intersections. By breaking it up into smaller segments, it can seem more manageable.

M@L

ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (141,691)
Fitness Minutes: (212,000)
Posts: 20,853
11/6/13 3:45 P

Perhaps if you ran around a resevoir or park where the scenery was nice, you might like running outside. Where do you run now ? If your neighborhood is boring or unsafe, you might run around a park, a college track or even a bike trail.

I can run on a treadmill, but I don't like it. I feel like a hamster in a wheel. I'd rather run outside where I can enjoy the fresh air and neighborhood scenery.



JCWIAKALA Posts: 347
11/6/13 1:05 P

There have been many discussions on this board about running inside vs outside. I suggest doing a search and finding a lot of information that way.

From what I've read and experienced personally, most people find the transition difficult. If you start outside, they hate the treadmill and vice versa. That doesn't mean you can't make the switch, you just have to stick with it.

I highly recommend developing a love of outdoor running because it's where you'll run if you decide to race and the outdoors will always be available while a treadmill might not be. Some suggestions: music, podcasts, run apps, audio books, a running partner or group, taking your dog (or borrowing a friend's), prayer, meditation, focusing on your breathing and form, checking out new routes, enjoying the scenery.

What has worked for me: I mix it up between podcasts and running with a partner (my husband). I run three times a week, twice near my home and once at a nearby park. Whenever I go on vacation, I make it a point to run where I'm at.

ZORBS13 SparkPoints: (103,143)
Fitness Minutes: (103,547)
Posts: 13,199
11/6/13 11:24 A

find experienced runner friends to run with who will kick your butt, distract you and not let you stop when you want to.

I'm the opposite, always want to bail on the treadmill but can run forever outside.

RKING10 Posts: 152
11/6/13 10:39 A

Any tips for running outside? When I walk/run on a treadmill-I am able to push myself through until I have met my daily requirments, but outside I just have no push.Tips and tricks?

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