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Range free or caged hen eggs



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SWEETNHOT
Posts: 526
3/18/13 12:48 P

I have chickens that I free range.



BUNNYKICKS
Posts: 2,175
3/18/13 12:18 P

I have been very spoiled lately, a co-worker has a friend with many hens, who has been selling her excess eggs to us for about the same price as "factory hen" eggs. I KNOW these hens are free-range (within a fenced-in compound to protect them from coyotes etc.); the little daughter goes around picking up the eggs from the yard (apparently when not confined to a box, a hen will fluff up a little nest and lay an egg wherever she pleases - who knew!). The eggs are yummy and so fresh, and I am happy to be able to support small-scale local agriculture in this way.



ELAINEANNE1
Posts: 463
3/17/13 12:50 P

I always buy free range and the RSPCA here have controls on it.



CAPRI89
SparkPoints: (39)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 8
3/17/13 12:43 P

"I always buy range free eggs. I volunteered to work at a chicken farm for a day and after the day was over, I stopped eating eggs from hens that were caged."

You have to be careful when reading into descriptive titles. Caged doesn't always mean gross and inhuman. Free range doesn't always mean open, free, and natural.

This is considered "free range:" upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6
a/Free-range-hens.jpg


This is considered "caged:" thecitychicken.com/newhenhouse2.jpg



CORTNEY-LEE
SparkPoints: (48,339)
Fitness Minutes: (39,734)
Posts: 2,909
3/17/13 12:23 P

I am lucky - I live near a lot of Mennonite farms, so I buy my eggs from there - cheaper too



CAPRI89
SparkPoints: (39)
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Posts: 8
3/17/13 12:20 P

"It is illegal in denmark to sale eggs at the gate because of the risk of Salmonella infection which sits on the shell."

Yet it's been proven that farm fresh eggs from hens raised in sanitary environments are significantly less likely to be contaminated with salmonella than any egg you can buy in the supermarket and when contamination is present, the bacterial count is far less. In addition to anything that the egg may have picked up before being shipped out, supermarket eggs are washed which removes the bloom and allows bacteria to enter the egg through pores in the shell.

Interesting, but it reeks of lobbying in the interest of large scale agriculture.

Edited by: CAPRI89 at: 3/17/2013 (12:31)


REDSHOES2011
SparkPoints: (35,936)
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Posts: 7,159
3/17/13 11:40 A

I eat what is cheapest as just appreciate a balanced meal.. If I cared about every aspect I would purchase myself poor and the goal of a lifestyle change is to change my habits. It is illegal in denmark to sale eggs at the gate because of the risk of Salmonella infection which sits on the shell..

Edited by: REDSHOES2011 at: 3/17/2013 (11:44)


LOVEXAVIE
SparkPoints: (25,715)
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Posts: 1,836
3/17/13 11:26 A

The way they raise chickens always bothered me...I'd buy the cage free and then heard about all the different definitions of cage free vs free range vs other things.
I discovered Vital Farms pasture raised organic eggs and so far, these are the best "commercial" eggs I can find (Whole Foods has them). BUT, they are $6.99 a doz (!!). I do buy them and just try to cut back in other areas.
A neighbor occasionally brings us fresh eggs from her daughter's farm and holy cow - the difference is night and day in terms of flavor!!
The Vital Farms eggs are the closest I've been able to get to that.
I'd love to buy farm eggs if I could find a place to get them!



CHLOEAGH
SparkPoints: (28,522)
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Posts: 1,012
3/17/13 11:12 A

I get naturally produced eggs (such as from the family friend who raises chickens) whenever possible. I think they taste WAY better and is one of the reasons I hope to raise my own chickens at some point.



CAPRI89
SparkPoints: (39)
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Posts: 8
3/17/13 10:47 A

I keep my own hens for this purpose. It really doesn't require a lot of space, effort, or money. For three hens I think I spend about $20 every four months on feed and scratch. A large portion of their diet comes from leftovers which cuts down on the amount you need to spend tremendously and also improves the quality of the eggs since I've found that most chicken feeds don't closely resemble a chicken's natural diet. They keep them alive, and that's about it.

My chickens aren't free range because they'd almost certainly be killed by something if they were. They have an enclosed coop made from one of those commercially available dog kennels covered in aluminum panels and a run that allows them to venture outside without fear of being gobbled up by predators. I clean the coop out about once a month and put the soiled shavings in my compost bin.

Edited by: CAPRI89 at: 3/17/2013 (10:51)


CMCOLE
Posts: 2,667
3/17/13 10:33 A

I don't have a choice, at present.
There are no hen farmers nearby



SPKRAUSE
Posts: 543
3/17/13 7:09 A

I buy cage-free, but I also realize that that term does not imply that much in terms of regulation ... it just means the hens have some limited access to the outside. I'd prefer 'pasteured' eggs, but around here they'yre [1] hard to find (maybe one store in town carrying them; several more an hour away); and [2] they're about twice as expensive. I'd contemplate having our own hen out back if we had a backyard.

Edited by: SPKRAUSE at: 3/17/2013 (07:11)


TWININGS12
SparkPoints: (17,330)
Fitness Minutes: (6,835)
Posts: 610
3/17/13 6:44 A

Do you buy range free or caged hen eggs? I always buy range free eggs. I volunteered to work at a chicken farm for a day and after the day was over, I stopped eating eggs from hens that were caged.



 
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