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Protein following a workout



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WAYCAT
Posts: 971
5/21/13 11:15 A

Kris, Hi there and thanks for your reply - I bet your nephew's room smelt lush after having your loaves rise in there, all lovely and doughy!

Yes, the weight on my ticker is current - around 108-109lbs. I'm on a weight gain program at the moment, which is why I wanted to ask this question regarding protein.

All in all I do need to up my calories, but I wanted to be sure that it wasn't just quantity but also quality that I was getting.





GDBEAR65
SparkPoints: (2,095)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 574
5/21/13 10:07 A

didn't read the article but you should have some protein with every meal, which includes post-workout. Quality carbs are equally important and on that note, I'm not sure bread qualifies. Protein provides the essential amino acids your body needs to create proteins within the body, including those required for recovery, repair and growth. Although cardio does not damage the muscles, they still need fuel for recovery.



JUSTEATREALFOOD
Posts: 999
5/21/13 8:12 A

Protein is not only important to consume after strength and cardio workouts you should be eating it with every single meal and snack each day. How much you need depends on many things like weight and activity level.

Bread is not a healthy main source of carbs. For optimal health and weight loss you should be getting most, if not all of your daily carbs from vegetables and fruit.

And finally fat is awesome! Eat more of it! I eat a very high fat diet from eggs, avocados, raw dairy, butter, coconut oil and olive oil. A higher fat consumption combined with low glycemic vegetables and moderate protein has help me achieve some amazing results.



SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (120,618)
Fitness Minutes: (32,354)
Posts: 20,996
5/21/13 12:59 A

I was looking at your weight-ticker and read your SparkPage. Is your weight current? If so, it may be that your body is crying out for more calories because it needs them, especially given the amount and type of exercise that you do.

I used to make bread - the old-fashioned way, not in a bread-maker. I would bulk bake, and use my nephew's bed as the place to raise the dough - his room had a huge window and the sun poured in there. I had to stop making it because I loved eating it fresh from the oven with loads of butter - LOL! I didn't make it lots - perhaps 2-3 times per month, but ......!

Good luck.
Kris





WAYCAT
Posts: 971
5/21/13 12:25 A

Many thanks for everyone's replies here - much to read and take on board.

I do have quite a varied diet overall, and I get most of my protein from things like fish, chicken, eggs and nuts. Carb wise, I make my own bread so that is where my main source of carbs comes from. I do eat potatoes, but don't like pasta atall - however, I have rice about once a week.

But I guess bread is main source of carbs.

I think I need to increase the amount of fat in my diet - I've always had a "thing" for eating fat, but really I know it is an important component of a well-balanced diet. I am concentrating on getting my fats from healthy sources like nuts, salmon, eggs, etc.....

Thanks also for the link to the article - I'm off to read it now!



LADYSTARWIND
SparkPoints: (19,777)
Fitness Minutes: (15,878)
Posts: 1,132
5/20/13 2:49 P

Thanks for the article link!
It was one I hadn't yet read--good info!!
patti



SPARK_COACH_JEN
Posts: 54,972
5/20/13 2:20 P

Here is an article you might find helpful:

www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_art
icles.asp?id=1082


Coach Jen



LADYSTARWIND
SparkPoints: (19,777)
Fitness Minutes: (15,878)
Posts: 1,132
5/20/13 1:14 P

If you are consistently eating protein as part of your meals every day, its my understanding that you should already be getting sufficient protein to meet those exercise-related needs. So eating it at a specific time (eg right after exercise) probably has little effect in how your body repairs itself, since that repair doesn't happen immediately. It takes a few days.....
I'd suggest eating whatever is in your calorie and nutrient range for that part of the day! (disclaimer: I'm still learning too!!)
patti

Edited by: LADYSTARWIND at: 5/20/2013 (13:15)


PENAM87
Posts: 46
5/20/13 12:55 P

Actually when you're doing any kind of cardio, you're still using different muscle groups to power your workout, especially with HIIT. You may not be pushing or building your muscles the same way as when lifting weights but they are still being worked on. So yes, protein is still very important even after a cardio workout.
In general, protein and fat are what help fuel your workouts. If you're not eating sufficient of each, then your body starts targeting the muscle you already have to give you energy, which then results in muscle loss.
Hope this helps!



LISA_C
SparkPoints: (23,488)
Fitness Minutes: (14,354)
Posts: 164
5/20/13 11:44 A

When doing strength training, you actually put tiny tears in your muscles. The extra protein helps to repair them and in the process of repairing them, it makes them bigger and stronger.

This is not the same thing that happens to your heart when doing cardio. You do not put tears in heart muscle when doing cardio. So if you want that bread, have it :)



WAYCAT
Posts: 971
5/20/13 11:13 A

This is my first post here outside of the Fitness board, so I hope I've come to the right place with this question.

I understand about the importance of eating protein following strength training, in order to help the muscles repair and rebuild.

But I got to thinking, does the same apply to a cardio workout? For example, when I do cardio it is hard, full-on cardio, either some sort of circuit / HITT training, or a long run on the treadmill with hills and speed intervals, or a similar workout but on the elliptical.

Would I be right in thinking that, in the case of cardio, the protein element isn't quite as important as it is following a strength workout? Or am I completely barking up the wrong tree. Afterall, cardio works your heart and that is a muscle too, right?

Am confused! Sometimes after cardio I seem to crave cashew nuts, but at other times I just want a lovely chunk of home made bread!

Someone please put me out of my misery on this one!

Thank you so much.



 
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