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Protein Powder Recommendation?



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SIMONEKP
Posts: 2,458
6/10/13 11:35 A

Great rebuttal PLYNSN316, I think people are trying to be helpful but are sometimes a little over enthusiastic in their belief that their way is the only way and everyone else is a quack. Muscle Milk is the protein supplement I use, it is not pure whey but a blend of whey and casein protein (blend contains rapid-releasing whey and slower digesting micellar caseins from milk protein isolate/concentrate plus calcium and sodium caseinates. This creates a constant supply of amino acids, the building blocks of muscle tissue), comes in a powder and a ready to drink package. RTD package is 170 calories with 7 grams of carb and 20g of protein, 7g of fat and 20% each of the essential vitamins and minerals. The company also makes a pure whey protein supplement but I haven't used it. Vanilla Creme is my favorite flavor and it tastes great.



MATTHEW0498
SparkPoints: (31,184)
Fitness Minutes: (18,507)
Posts: 1,377
6/10/13 11:19 A

Vitamnin Shop's brand, Bodytech Pro 24 is great



GREGINPROGRESS
Posts: 241
6/10/13 11:12 A

I read an article online several months ago that said several of the whey protein powders do not actually have as much whey protein as they claim on the label, and the article had a chart listing how much whey protein was actually in each product (sorry, I don't have the link anymore, but I think it was on bodybuilding.com). Bottom line, though, the article said Optimum Nutrition was the only brand that actually had as much whey in their powder as was claimed on the label. That's what I use, and I get it from gnc.com (not the GNC stores) because it is ALWAYS on sale on their website.

Regarding the Body Fortress stuff, from what I recall it might have had significantly less protein than was listed on the label. Also, the Body Fortress stuff that Walmart and grocery stores sell usually has creatine in it, which will make your muscles retain water and possibly cause bloating--not good for weight loss. Not sure if everyone would have this reaction, but I blew up like a balloon the few weeks I tried it.



FLANAGANSH
SparkPoints: (6,424)
Fitness Minutes: (5,443)
Posts: 133
6/10/13 9:09 A

Gnc sells a protein powder known as the amp amplified wheybolic protein. I use it for my workouts and running (which is geared toward lean muscle mass and fat elimination) it tastes great and does the job



TARESA21
SparkPoints: (2,391)
Fitness Minutes: (1,118)
Posts: 63
4/12/13 4:32 P

Im an herbalife fanatic...just sayin



C_ANEMONE
Posts: 822
4/12/13 12:39 A

If eating less than 1200 works for you, that's great. I just know so SO many people that it didn't work for (including myself - I need 1400 just at RMR). I'm glad you've done your research and that you are well informed. Good luck!

I like the whey protein powder that they Target makes. I think it's pretty low calorie, delicious, and inexpensive.



MICHELLEXXXX
SparkPoints: (6,056)
Fitness Minutes: (5,730)
Posts: 1,744
4/11/13 11:51 P

I think the 1200 calorie rule is funny and void of truth. Have you looked into calorie-cycling?

I recommend pure egg whites (which can be found in powder form as well) for those seeking supplemental protein to mix into smoothies.



PLYNSN316
Posts: 375
4/11/13 4:45 P

Thank you for all the awesome protein powder suggestions!

As for concerns over my nutrition and exercise, I appreciate the feedback. Thank you for spreading the supportive spark and looking out for a fellow sparker! I would like to point out that I did not request nutritional feedback or input regarding my diet. I simply asked for suggestions on protein powders. However, I realize that many people feel necessary to comment and provide feedback, even when it is unwarranted. So, I am taking a (long) moment to respond to those who are concerned about my well-being.

I am working closely with a licensed doctor and a registered dietician, who I meet with almost every week. I am following their prescribed guidelines. They specialize in medically supervised weight loss. I am one of hundreds of patients. I do not appreciate the comment regarding my doctor being licensed. I felt that was rather rude. I also feel the last comment re my nutritionist not knowing what she is doing is also extremely rude.

I realize there are a lot of schools of thought, opinions, studies, findings, etc. out there with regard to nutrition, diet, and exercise, often in complete opposition of one another. Everyone is entitled to their opinions, beliefs, thoughts, etc. We are all doing what we think is best for us. We have to find what works and stick with it! My plan is based on my personal research, beliefs, and opinions. The below response is based on what I think is best for me.

I, for one, believe the whole “eating under 1200 calories = starvation mode” is a myth. Some people have a BMR of 1200. In order to lose weight, they would need to eat less than 1200 calories. Or be EXTREMELY active. Like Biggest Loser TV Show active. Which is not realistic for day to day life.

So where did the whole eating under 1200 calories = slower metabolism = no weight loss come from? It began with the Minnesota Starvation Study. Several healthy young men, all well within normal weight ranges and healthy BMIs volunteered to live on a compound where their exercise and diet was strictly controlled. For 12 weeks of the experiment, they were on a “starvation diet”, which is defined as 50% of the calories your body needs to function (approximate BMR + activity level). They’re average calorie range was 3200 calories (based on activity level) to maintain their current weights (determined during first portion of study). So, a “starvation diet” for them = less than 1600 calories/day. They ate 1600 calories, and continued physical activity for 12 weeks. They lost significant amounts of weight. They were also subjected to psychological stressors to mimic starvation during wartime. Bad things happened to them and their bodies.

Given that my approximate caloric need (to maintain my weight) is 1500 calories, using the definition of “starvation diet” = 50% of calories needed to function (BMR + activity level), if I were to consume 50% or less of the calories needed to function, or 750 calories or less, I would be approaching a starvation diet. In order to have any of the supposed negative side effects of a starvation diet, I would need to maintain this deficit for months at a time. Additionally, my body fat would need to drop to below what is minimal to live on (5% for males, 6% for females). I rarely, if ever, get below 800 calories a day and my body fat percentage is WAY above 6%, so I am in no medical danger. Additionally, I am not being subjected to psychological stressors and I am not locked in a concrete bunker.

The whole “1200” calorie magic number is also based on the fact that as you reduce your caloric intake, it is harder to get ALL the nutrients you need from food. Which is why it’s not suggested that you undertake a VLCD or diet plan without a doctor’s supervision…which I have…with a LICENSED doctor, I will add for emphasis.

I also subscribe to the belief that our metabolism does slow down as we lose weight. However, this is normal. Your body needs less food/nutrition/fuel because there’s less of you.

Additionally, if eating under 1200 calories = starvation mode, and as a result, no weight loss…how does that explain anorexia nervosa? Individuals suffering from anorexia eat severely below 1200 calories. And they don’t stop losing weight. They don’t get fat. In fact, they lose WAY too much and their bodies start to shut down because they are not consuming enough fuel to function.

In addition to consuming 800-1000 calories a day, I am also trying to stick to a low carbohydrate plan. That is not to say I don’t eat carbohydrates at all. I just attempt to keep them under 100 grams/day. Despite various reports to the contrary (based on the FDA and USDA – who all have a financial interest in maintaining the agricultural industry in this country because the Feds subsidize farming…and are being paid to do so thanks to Big Food companies), there is no RDA of carbohydrates. In other words, carbs are not essential.

The RDA/essential nutrient concept is based on two things: 1) The nutrient is required for survival; and 2) The nutrient cannot be made by the body. The body is able to make as much glucose as the brain and a few other tissues need, on a day to day basis, from other sources (i.e. fat, gluconeogenesis, etc.). NOTE: The body is NOT able to provide sufficient carbohydrate to fuel high intensity workouts, such as sprinting or weight training…so carbs would be somewhat essential for extreme physical activity. HOWEVER, from the standpoint of survival, the minimum amount of carbs required in a diet is ZERO GRAMS PER DAY.

My workouts vary from week to week (I need to be more consistent). Sometimes I run 3-4 times/week, and walk 2x/week. Sometimes I only run once a week. When I have a long run (like the 10K I did last Sunday), I make a point to increase my carbs slightly.

So, I appreciate the concern over my health and well-being, and if I have any concerns over my nutrition and health, I will be sure to bring them up with my physician (who is LICENSED).

Below are some of the sources of research I have based some of my opinions on:

“Starvation Mode”/VLCD Research
http://www.weightwatchers.com/util/art/i
ndex_art.aspx?tabnum=1&art_id=35501
http://fattyfightsback.blogspot.com/2009
/03/mtyhbusters-starvation-mode.html
http://www.webmd.com/diet/low-calorie-di
ets
http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/lo
w_calorie.htm

Carb Research
http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nutriti
on/how-many-carbohydrates-do-you-need.
html
http://www.healthcentral.com/diabetes/c/
17/27575/brain-fuel-myth/
http://www.healthy-eating-politics.com/d
ietary-guidelines.html
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/kingc
orn/film.html



C_ANEMONE
Posts: 822
4/11/13 1:55 P

Yikes! You should be getting at least 1200 calories a day, otherwise your body goes into starvation mode and you will GAIN weight! I would think a nutritionist would know this...



CUDA440
SparkPoints: (62,515)
Fitness Minutes: (53,540)
Posts: 7,162
4/11/13 11:34 A

Designer whey:
Cal = 100 per scoop
Carbs = 6
protein = 18
and I see stevia is listed in ingredients.
I think Rite Aid has them buy 1 get one free till April 27. I usually pick up a couple of the 2LB containers.

Beckie



ACTIVEGRANDMAP
Posts: 3,064
4/11/13 9:07 A

I think Body Fortress whey protein meats your criteria. Cheap at Walmart and often on sale at Walgreens.



DIDS70
Posts: 5,070
4/11/13 8:59 A

the brand that I use from Maximized Living meets those goals. It is rather pricey though. The whey comes from 100% green fed cows and the powder is cold pressed. Message me if you want the website.



SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (120,840)
Fitness Minutes: (32,354)
Posts: 21,011
4/11/13 7:10 A

Hi - I can't recommend any Protein Powders, but am rather intrigued. I know that this doesn't answer your question, but I read your SparkPage after looking at your Nutrition Tracker. The tracker reveals often a very high protein intake - over over 100g, but often a very low calorie intake (800-1000) and at times a very low Carb intake. Then I saw on your SP Program:

Nutrition:
Cals: 800-1000
Carbs: Less than 100
Protein: 100-200
Fat: 27-61
Fiber: 25-35

One thing that really concerns me is that with that amount of protein you are at high risk of kidney stones and other issues relating to your kidneys, as well as osteoporosis. There are other negatives, too. I don't know whether you are actually running like you were planning on doing, but if you are, then I would seriously be inclined to rethink your nutrition goals. I did note that you appear to be working with a Dr and Nutritionist! Are they qualified and registered? It just doesn't seem very healthy, and is actually very risky. When you are doing the exercise - and running distances is a good example, then you really need carbs, too! SMART carbs.

Below is a link that you may find helpful:
www.webmd.com/diet/high-protein-low-carboh
ydrate-diets


I understand your frustrations about the slow weight-loss you had before - I also lost weight very slowly - 16 months to lose 50lb. In actual fact, the slow losses are the ones to aim for. They are far more likely to stay off, and they are a healthy way of going about this journey.

I hope that you have success and don't have any health issues relating to this.

Take care,
Kris



DANAG22
Posts: 739
4/11/13 6:11 A

Jay Robb's Egg or Whey Protein in Chocolate/Vanilla is pretty good, 110 calories per serving, 24 grams of protein both have Stevia in them. The Egg protein has about 4 carbs per serving an tastes better than the Whey as the Whey only has 1 carb per serving. I have the Strawberry Whey protein as my two snacks after breakfast and after lunch. The strawbery I'm not crazy about I will go back to the other two flavors as soon as I run out.



PLYNSN316
Posts: 375
4/11/13 4:10 A

I am looking for a protein powder (egg white or whey, preferably) that is under 180 calories per serving, less than 25 grams of carbs, and at least 20 grams of protein. As if that's not enough criteria, I am also looking for a brand that does not use aspartame, sucralose, splenda, etc. I am ok with xylitol or stevia, or other 'natural' low calorie sweetener. Any suggestions? Thank you!



 
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