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ZENANDNOW SparkPoints: (38,175)
Fitness Minutes: (2,138)
Posts: 2,943
6/14/13 11:16 A

I have the same problem with getting enough potassium to reach my recommended daily range. However, as another poster stated, many of the foods you eat contain potassium that may not be tracked or listed in the SparkPeople foods tracker or on store nutrition labels.

So...I take two servings of a good potassium supplement daily, plus whatever foods I eat that can be tracked or not. I don't worry so much anymore about trying to reach my daily potassium levels. emoticon I get regular blood work at my family doctor's office every three to four months, and I can see the potassium level in my body...and make adjustments accordingly.



Edited by: ZENANDNOW at: 6/14/2013 (11:17)
CMCOLE Posts: 2,667
6/14/13 7:19 A

wow, that's a great list.
Thanks for sharing

SLIMMERKIWI SparkPoints: (133,027)
Fitness Minutes: (32,923)
Posts: 21,689
6/14/13 6:26 A

Below is a link for plenty of Potassium-rich foods:
www.sparkpeople.com/blog/blog.asp?post=hig
h_potassium_foods_for_a_healthy_balanc
e


How you prepare your veges can make a difference too. My Brother-in-law had to eat a very low Potassium diet, so as a result when he ate potatoes, he had to peel them, then soak them, then tip the water out and replace it with fresh water, then boil them. He wasn't allowed baked jacket potatoes because they were too high. Obviously baked in their jackets would be a good way to go to get more from your diet.

Don't be tempted to by OTC Potassium supplements, tho', because unless your Dr has done bloods to check the level, it can actually be dangerous - too much has a very serious consequence. Always check with your Dr before you embark on this.

Kris

ICEDEMETER Posts: 820
6/13/13 12:14 P

If you are in a place where the Potassium content of foods is not a required listing on the nutrition label, then odds are that you are actually getting a lot more than is showing up on your tracker. If you are basing things on items which you put in yourself, or have been entered by other users, then you will not be including Potassium at all for those foods.

Here is the listing by nutrient from the USDA that might help you figure out some of the higher Potassium foods:

www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=2
2769


I also use NutritionData.self.com ( nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg
-products/106/2
) in order to get the Potassium and other nutrient content for items in the database here, or that I'm entering mysef, so that I can include all of the items that aren't required to be listed on the label. By manually inputting all of the nutrients for each food, I feel that I'm getting a better picture of what I'm actually eating.

Hope this helps!

SIMJOHN58 Posts: 46
6/13/13 11:50 A

I am having trouble keeping my Potassium K within the required range, I constantly fall lower than the required range for me. I know Potassium is vital when exercising. I know Bananas are a good source of Potassium K but what other products, veggies, fruits contain this?

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