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Please help regarding running



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UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
3/20/13 1:27 P

Just be aware that "feeling as difficult" is nothing to do with HR.

Many members have reported their confusion at things that "feel more difficult" resulting in a lower HR than things that felt easier.

How it feels is more a result of our conditioning to that particular movement type than our heart rate.

I doubt you'd need to ensure it stays below any particular number. Just try not to push yourself too hard, especially if you felt that you were the times that you experienced the problems.



BBENNETT
SparkPoints: (81,871)
Fitness Minutes: (49,401)
Posts: 4,689
3/20/13 12:09 P

I have been cleared by 3 doctors now, including one specialist. I did not say that 118 to 159 was an appropriate range. That is what my heart rate monitor said I worked out at. My point was that 159 was too high, yet didn't feel as difficult as workouts I've done where I had problems. Therefore, it was probably higher then. According to Curves, the appropriate range for women at age 40 is between 126 and 153, or 70 to 85% of maximum. My plan is to wear my heart rate monitor during future workouts and make sure that my heart rate doesn't exceed 153. It makes sense to me.



SIMPLELIFE2
Posts: 698
3/19/13 10:48 P

You really, really need to go back to your doctor, as others have suggested. How did you determine that 118 to 159 is your appropriate range? On what basis have you established that 159 is your max? You are merely guessing that you were higher than 159 those other times. You have no basis other than you felt bad.

You will "make sure I stay within a safe zone." How are you qualified to determine what that is? I'm not trying to be mean here, but there is no logical basis for what you have written. Being "lightheaded, dizzy, nauseous, and felt like I was going to pass out" while doing cardio is NOT normal. See a different specialist and demand that an answer is found. All too often, women are not treated the same as men when it comes to such issues.



BBENNETT
SparkPoints: (81,871)
Fitness Minutes: (49,401)
Posts: 4,689
3/19/13 3:03 P

No problem. Thank you both for your input. I went for a walk/jog with my family last night and used the heart rate monitor. Once I got it to work, my range was between 118 and 159. I wasn't even working all that hard. That tells me that when I experienced the problems in the past, I was probably way above 159 and just working way too hard. I am going to continue to monitor my heart rate, make sure I stay within a safe zone, and am fairly certain that all will be well.



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
3/18/13 10:42 P

No, sorry. Nancy nailed it with "but this is really outside the scope of advice for our members and experts to even begin guiding you".

It would be inappropriate for anyone to attempt to offer any advice on an undiagnosed and intermittent thing which could be a medical condition.

Hope you get it sorted, but this really isn't something we could/should help you with in any way, sorry.



BBENNETT
SparkPoints: (81,871)
Fitness Minutes: (49,401)
Posts: 4,689
3/18/13 6:49 P

I appreciate the replies. I did go to another doctor for another issue and brought it up again. After reading the notes of the previous 2 doctors and talking with me, she agreed with the prior assessments. Basically, I could opt to do a treadmill test, but in the very unlikely chance that it would test positive, it would very likely be a false positive which would lead to some very invasive procedures with risks of their own. Since my original post, I have tried 2 of the prepare for a 5K programs. The walking one was way too easy and the next step up was too hard. The doctor suggested that if I am unable to stop worrying about it, I should go ahead and get the treadmill test done. However, I decided that a heart rate monitor would possibly be beneficial and help me to stay within a "safe" and effective zone. Anyone have any other advice? I found my son's heart rate monitor I bought him a few years ago. (He refuses to use it.) I am going to find a battery for it and try it out.



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
2/28/13 12:38 A

Please please please see your doctor!

However, I would suggest that if you are *normally* able to do any particular workout and not experience any negative symptoms it is probably not the workout. You might be unusually low on some vitamin or iron or something or have a blood pressure issue. But if you can usually do something without any problems, that something probably isn't "too hard" for you.

So ... you have been doing exactly the same workout (speed, resistance, incline) for four years? When your doctor clears you to keep exercising you really need to think about stepping it up. Doing exactly the same thing all the time, your body becomes exceptionally used to that thing, and that thing only. You'll want to include varying intervals, hills, sprint training, High Intensity Interval Training, and a bunch of steady state as well, to keep your body guessing and on its toes.



SP_COACH_NANCY
SparkPoints: (158,833)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
2/27/13 6:40 P

Hi BBENNETT,

If you are feeling light headed, dizzy and nauseous and feeling like you are going to pass out, you may want to get another opinion. Unfortunately there could be a number of reasons as to why you are experiencing the symptoms you are (maybe running too fast than what your body is adapted to running), but this is really outside the scope of advice for our members and experts to even begin guiding you. Sorry.

Coach Nancy



BBENNETT
SparkPoints: (81,871)
Fitness Minutes: (49,401)
Posts: 4,689
2/27/13 6:28 P

I found an article several years ago about running faster. Every week for about 4 years, I've been doing a 24 minute routine on the treadmill at the gym (5 min at 3.5, 2 at 5, 2 at 5.3, 5 at 5.7, 3 at 5.9, 2 at 5, 5 at 3.5). It has been a tough workout, but got easier over time. About 3 months ago, I was about 15 minutes into it when I suddenly got lightheaded, dizzy, nauseous, and felt like I was going to pass out. However, I was able to finish my workout without any other problems. I was scared enough to go see my doctor about it. She referred me to a specialist who told me I was the healthiest patient he'd seen all week, to not go so fast, and seek help sooner if it happens again. Being stubborn, I didn't change a thing and everything has been fine until a few weeks ago. I was doing the same thing, about 12 minutes in, when I started feeling short of breath and weak. I was not able to finish my workout as usual, but modified it and have been okay since. However, I am now too scared to do the "usual" and want to do some type of treadmill workout that will make me stronger, not give me a heart attack. Problem is, I have no idea what to do or where to start. Any suggestions? Has anyone else experienced frightening episodes while exercising? Can exercise do more harm than good? When and why? I'm feeling a bit lost. Please help. Thanks!



 
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