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-CORAL- SparkPoints: (39,058)
Fitness Minutes: (39,094)
Posts: 2,274
1/3/14 4:19 P

I read this article on CNN that summarized a study with plate color in question recently... the study seemed to find that people eat less on red plates.

"the new study, published in the journal Appetite this month, indicates it's not contrast, but one specific color -- red -- that causes people to cut back on what they consume. The research tested how much food or hand cream people used when the product was placed on a red, white or blue plate."

So it doesn't sound like they tested any colors besides red, white or blue. Here's the link to the article:

www.cnn.com/2013/11/29/health/seeing-red/<
/a>

KCLARK89 SparkPoints: (27,464)
Fitness Minutes: (15,946)
Posts: 1,078
1/3/14 10:54 A

I've definitely heard the whole color theory. However, my plates are all red, and I've heard both sides for using red plates :) I did switch from the big dinner plates to the small salad plates. Unless I'm actually having a salad and then I load up the huge plate!

MISSRUTH Posts: 3,973
1/3/14 4:51 A

I saw a thing on one of those morning shows on tv a while back, where they talked about the contrast in color of the food vs. color of the plate, influencing how much people ate. ie, spaghetti with a lot of tomato sauce served on a red plate = people ate more. Versus on a white plate, they ate less. I don't know if an actual study was done.... I can say from my own experience-- when I replaced my dishes, I bought all white. Colorful foods (such as, lots of low-starch veggies) look fantastic on those plates, the colors really pop. We don't just eat with our stomachs and mouths; we eat with our eyes and our noses (sense of smell) too. A small plate filled with the same amount of food as a large plate, looks like more food.

HHUGHES71 SparkPoints: (79,849)
Fitness Minutes: (34,375)
Posts: 4,820
1/2/14 1:34 P

That is definitely an interesting question. I try to use salad plates vs dinner plates when I eat here at home and that seems to help me w/ potion control. Our plates are white w/ an ivy trim.

MEGAPEEJ Posts: 732
1/2/14 1:27 P

Hmm, that's an interesting concept! I've never heard of a study where they determined if pattern or design elements changed how much people ate, but I have heard of a study where color affects eating patterns (on the plate as well as surroundings).

This newer study foodpsychology.cornell.edu/outreach/color_
plate.html
talks about high color contrast being the key to serving less, that people will serve themselves more food if it's very close in color to the plate (it just doesn't look like much when it blends in). And I remember an older study (but can't find the link) that said colors like blue and black were appetite suppressants, where as yellow and red stimulated appetite (which is why they're such common colors in fast food restaurants).

MAMA_CD Posts: 1,498
1/2/14 10:58 A

I know people eat less with smaller plates, but is there any studies out there as to what and how much people ate using plain (white) or colored plates or patterned plates, or fancy design plates with scalloped edges etc? I was just thinking, because I saw a patterned, fancy edged plate which seemed to fill space because of the design and was attractive in itself because of the edging, I was thinking that with food on it, people may eat less, or may choose different kinds of food on it that complimented the pattern, rather than made the food unappealing because of the pattern. What do you think? Does anyone know if there are any studies on that?

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