Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

 
Message Boards
FORUM:   Fitness and Exercise
TOPIC:  

No hills to run down or negative incline treadmill



Click here to read our frequently asked Fitness and Exercise questions.

 
 
Search the
Message Boards:
Search
      Share
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Author: Message: Sort First Post on Top


BFWHITEHORSE
Posts: 96
5/8/13 12:13 P

well, no hills nearby here atleast. I guess I will have to try & improvise.

On the plus side, I am going on vacation in august to my country, so that would be a good time to try to find something I can run on and hope I dont get run over or kidnapped.
emoticon

In the meanwhile if I find anything I'll post it here. I'm sure many people would be curious about this. I have been asking everyone I can but no luck so far :(

Edited by: BFWHITEHORSE at: 5/8/2013 (12:14)


-CORAL-
SparkPoints: (35,853)
Fitness Minutes: (30,690)
Posts: 2,219
5/7/13 2:05 P

If there really is no hillwork you can do near where you live, I would suggest taking a trip every couple weeks to somewhere that does have hills like a nearby mountain or gorge, even if it's a couple hours away.... other wise your knees and quads are going to give out. I think running downhill is harder than running uphill.

editing to add.. I can not imagine living somewhere with no hills.. .ha ha

Edited by: -CORAL- at: 5/7/2013 (14:06)


LEC358
SparkPoints: (8,914)
Fitness Minutes: (6,540)
Posts: 2,001
5/7/13 10:51 A

The thing about running up/down hills is that a lot of it is about how you're striding and what your balance is like so working in place isn't really going to help much. Just use the inclines you have to do intervals and maybe take a couple of weekends to a hillier area for some fitness vacations?



BFWHITEHORSE
Posts: 96
5/7/13 10:46 A

My idea was if I could find some kind of running drill that I could do standing on the smaller slopes I can find and practice in place or in limited space...? Really dont know how practical this is though...



BFWHITEHORSE
Posts: 96
5/7/13 10:38 A

thankyou for the replies :)

I was thinking downhill running was a piece of cake till I started doing my research & reading about another runner who had done the same race this last feb. She said her knees hurt real bad from the controlled running downhill...

The problem is I live in the desert... well sort of... a concrete jungle in the middle of a desert. No streams, rivers or anything... The closest thing to a slope is the ramp side of the pedestrian crossing (underground) that we have... unfortunately each ramp is no longer than 10m at the most... so I do not know how practical this would be.
A park outside the city has a small hill... about a meter or 2 high... but nothing really steep or longer... unless I run up and down the same hill a hundred times...?

Edited by: BFWHITEHORSE at: 5/7/2013 (10:46)


ZORBS13
SparkPoints: (94,369)
Fitness Minutes: (95,761)
Posts: 12,912
5/7/13 9:42 A

M@L

I've run a half that has 6K straight downhill on a highway. Obviously, the only time the highway is closed is on race day.

I didn't train downhill running specifically, but I just watched my form and made sure not to overstride and tax my quads unnecessarily.



MOTIVATED@LAST
Posts: 13,944
5/7/13 9:26 A

Stairs aren't going to be much use to you, as while you might be descending, the foot itself is horizontal. A genuinely tilted surface loads the thigh muscles much more than stairs, as your body tries to brake itself.

Zorbs's suggestions are good ones. I train for downhill hiking at a nearby old quarry site, where they have collapsed the sides to form a grassy embankment. Streams and rivers will often have embankments where you can train on. Use your imagination, and keep your eyes open as you travel around town.

But at 26 km downhill, I am guessing the gradient will in fact be pretty gentle (less than 5%). Not the steeper (15%+) gradients you can encounter trail running that can really load up your thighs. I'll be interested to hear from road runners as to whether they ever encounter descents steep enough that they need to train for?

M@L



LEC358
SparkPoints: (8,914)
Fitness Minutes: (6,540)
Posts: 2,001
5/7/13 8:24 A

Would stair/bleacher workouts be an option? Its not exactly the same but a lot of the same muscles would be worked. When running down hill, my biggest thing to focus on is not overstriding and loosing my balance and ending up going butt over tea kettle down the hill :P



ZORBS13
SparkPoints: (94,369)
Fitness Minutes: (95,761)
Posts: 12,912
5/7/13 8:24 A

parking garage ramps, overpasses and running stairs.



BFWHITEHORSE
Posts: 96
5/7/13 8:08 A

My upcoming race in feb next year has a downhill section of almost 26k.
(falt 10k, up 26k, turn around, down 26k, flat 10k)

Where I live there are no hills to run up or run down from. The race itself is in another state.

I tried googling and searching SP for alternatives but didnt find anything other than setting up the treadmill in such a way that its back end is raised on a platform to give a artificial negative incline or workout on a negative incline treadmill... both of which I cannot do in the gym I workout at.

So what other options do I have in terms of training the muscles used during downhill running? I have tried to read up on the form when running downhill...however just reading wont help and if I could workout the muscles used in a similar way it would be great.

Also if there are any 'downhill stand in place' running drills done on a slope? I can always try to do those drills by running in place on the ramps found near building entrances...

P.S. The trainers at my gym have no idea. They are unfortunately more general kind of trainers and not really into running I'm afraid :(



 
Page: 1 of (1)  
Search  



Share


 
Diet Resources: reasons for not losing weight | diet but not losing weight | on diet but not losing weight