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Missing Asian Food



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NIRERIN
Posts: 11,754
7/20/13 8:38 A

plug in what you are eating into the tracker and see. if spark doesn't have basic entries for things like daikon, use the usda's database or nutritiondata.self.com to find what you are using and manually enter it.
odds are if you are using plain ingredients and cooking them without too much oil or soy sauce, you're probably eating pretty well. you likely won't find a lot of those basic asian recipes on weightloss sites. people like to stick with what they know, and the really good, basic asian recipes are pretty out there for people on the standard american diet. most well stocked grocery stores will carry miso soup packets and maybe one kind of miso. my local whole foods carries miso soup packets and cups, and maybe 1-3 kinds of miso paste depending on what else they are stocking. the last time i was in my local asian supermarket the miso section was at least three feet long and two feet tall and probably had at least twenty different kinds of miso. and that's just miso, which is a pretty commonly known and available ingredient. the more likely you are to have to find the ingredient at an asian market, the less likely it is to show up in a common loss website. people like to stick with what they know and too many strange ingredients tends to make most people give up and not bother.



BUNNYKICKS
Posts: 2,267
7/20/13 2:43 A

You will find lots of asian recipes on the Sparkrecipes site. I just did a quick search - 19 different recipes for Tom Yum. You will be amazed at how many foods are listed in the nutrition database, too. You can also add your own recipes to the Recipe Calculator, so you can track the calories and nutrition in your favorite foods even if nobody else did before.

Asian food that you make at home can be a very healthy choice. Just watch your portion sizes for the starchy things like noodles and rice, the amount of oil you use when frying. When eating in restaurants, well, some are better than others. A lot of restaurants (of any type of cuisine) rely heavily on breading and deep frying and loads of carbs.



PILLOWFULFF
SparkPoints: (24)
Fitness Minutes: (0)
Posts: 1
7/19/13 11:35 P

I do most of my shopping at the asain markets and snag up a lot of greens and various proteins. Asain recipes (that do not use much oil or noodles or rice) are very healthy and quick to cook. Yet every time I got to a weight lost site it's missing basic asain recipes. One example is that there is no egg flower soup, or dried seaweed snacks (yeah sodium not a good idea but I don't cook with salt and tend to be very light on the soy sauce).

how bout Kimchii, or pickled diakon and carrots. how bout blood (has the firmness of tofu). I haven't checked these yet but wonton, humbow, beef adobe, thai cabbage salad, tom yum, curry, udon, sushi, miso soup, pho, spring rolls (see through rice ones with shrimp and a peanut sauce), lychee, dried mushrooms, dragon fruit, katsu, hot pot, the korean rice with the beans in it. wonder if they have black eyed peas. gyoza, onion pancake, mochi, rice cakes, hoping they have beef and broccoli on here. plantain bananas. bean sprout salad. I can go on for ages.

so I'm in the dark about whether or not my diet is healthy, I gained my weight from various injuries. I don't cook american food often. oh oh, love borscht, duck, elk, lamb.



 
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