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BUNNYKICKS Posts: 2,310
3/19/13 2:38 P

And in addition to the animal welfare issue (which is important to me), there's the entire Global Food System's welfare!

When you think about it -

Human beings (omnivores), can make beneficial use of meat (cattle) and grain.
Human beings CANNOT make beneficial use of GRASS.

Cattle consume the grass that we humans cannot - and convert it into a form that we can eat (meat). THIS MAKES GOOD SENSE.

When you add grain to the animal's diet, well - now instead of CONVERTING otherwise-inaccessible calories from forage crops to "human food", they are COMPETING with humans for those same calories.

Which is pretty silly, yes?

YOGINILMT Posts: 309
3/19/13 2:11 P


Cows are not designed to eat grain, but grass. Feeding cows grain that they are hardly able to digest results in severe intestinal blockages, infections, diseases, and with that an increased usage of antibiotics.
Furthermore, grain fed cattle are usually fed in troughs in feed lots, while grass fed cattle must be let out to pasture.

Feeding cows grain leads to increased suffering for the cow.

MZNAYLUV SparkPoints: (4,179)
Fitness Minutes: (5,811)
Posts: 83
3/19/13 2:00 P

Grass fed does taste so much better...and from what I've read is better for us.

CMCOLE Posts: 2,667
3/19/13 8:14 A

there is a difference in them.
While not often available locally, I do enjoy the taste and texture of the grass fed.

I'd suspect if we had gluten issues; the grain-fed would be off our plates completely

DIDS70 Posts: 5,070
3/18/13 9:31 A

I go with Jordin Rubin's quote "you are not what you eat, you are what they eat."

I choose only 100% green fed. Once you put grain into the diet it is no longer grass fed in my opinion. I don't care if it is 1 day or 2 months.

You also have to trust your providers. i do. The farms I get my meat from is 100% green fed.
I eat meat maybe two or three times a year.

ALLIE_ME Posts: 248
3/17/13 8:46 P

Grass fed is superior (read in many sources). As far as it causing heart disease, I suggest reading the book 'The Great Cholesterol Myth' by Drs. Bowden and Sinatra.

www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-jonny-bowden/cho
lesterol-health_b_2035487.html


GZELLEFRO SparkPoints: (42,952)
Fitness Minutes: (29,194)
Posts: 2,224
3/16/13 10:52 P

We have a small herd of cattle and butcher one out every year for our own consumption. I feel much happier eating something that I've raised myself or is locally raised because of the conditions in stock yards and the use of hormones and antibiotics in those cattle. I feel it makes us healthier.

As for whether grain fed or grass fed being better for you, I'd say that the more natural and unprocessed the food that they consume, the better food it will provide for you, just like when we eat less processed food, etc. It just makes sense.

Thanks for the articles and references.

BUNNYKICKS Posts: 2,310
3/16/13 10:46 P

Although "a piece of beef is more or less a piece of beef," nutritionally......

Grass fed diets make for healthier animals. More humane, less requirement for antibiotics.

Heavy grain-based diets make for a more tender, fat-marbled product (which may or may not be desirable, depending on one's taste and attitude towards marbled/fattier cuts of meat).

Grain based diets are known to promote growth of e.coli., which is obviously something that "the less of, the better."

One reference in support of the above statements:

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/0105
11074623.htm


MUSCATDBQ SparkPoints: (3,439)
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Posts: 214
3/16/13 8:14 P

Grass fed tastes so much better. My dad raises a couple head of cattle for his horse training and work so he keeps one every year or so to butcher. The cows live in the pasture with the horses and eat primarily grass. Sometimes it is supplemented a little bit with grain depending on the time of year and weather. The taste is very much different (in a good way) from the store bought stuff. Plus, the meat is a lot leaner since the cows are running around the pasture instead of not able to move packed into a building (doesn't make good hamburgers for this reason, but it is awesome for casseroles and there is pretty much zero fat to drain off).

VELVETMERLIN Posts: 229
3/16/13 8:04 P

I think grass-fed beef tastes better (I do believe it is healthier). I used to work at a horse farm where they also raised cattle and they gave me some-it was the best I ever had!

SLIMMERKIWI SparkPoints: (131,680)
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3/16/13 6:34 P

I NZ we don't really have the choice - it is generally grass-fed, grass-fed and more grass-fed :-) (unless we are in drought :-(

Kris

MICHELLEXXXX SparkPoints: (6,866)
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3/16/13 6:05 P

I choose 6oz grass-fed beef about twice a month for some heme-iron. I believe grass-fed is healthier based on all the articles I've come across.

Edited by: MICHELLEXXXX at: 3/16/2013 (20:55)
ZENANDNOW SparkPoints: (37,662)
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3/16/13 5:57 P

...grain-fed beef?

The answer to this question is inconclusive. While beef from grain-fed cattle is higher in fat overall, both grass-fed beef and grain-fed beef contain saturated fat, which often is associated with a greater risk for heart disease. However, in grass-fed beef, a higher percentage of this fat is stearic acid, which does not raise cholesterol.

Grass-fed beef also is richer in omega-3 fatty acids than conventional beef, but the amount pales in comparison to that in fish, and it's in a form (alpha-linolenic acid) that may not have the same benefits as omega-3s from fish. In addition, grass-fed beef has more conjugated linoleic acid, which is often claimed to help prevent heart disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity. But most of the evidence comes from lab and animal studies, so it's hard to draw firm conclusions about its effect on humans.

Grass-fed cattle rarely require antibiotics, while those raised on grain routinely get drugs. Many scientists believe that the widespread use of antibiotics in animals is contributing to the rise of drug-resistant bacteria.

* Source: Robert J Davis, PhD, adjunct professor, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, and the author of "Coffee Is Good For You: The Truth About Diet and Nutrition Claims" (Perigee).

** This article is from the Bottom Line/Health newsletter, Volume 27, Number 4, April 3013

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