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How much cardio as a beginner?



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UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
10/5/11 2:14 P

Definitetly talk to your trainer.

But stop blaming stretching. Stretching probably helped to reduce this feeling and it would have been worse without it. The soreness comes from the exercise, not the stretching after! :)



SP_COACH_NANCY
SparkPoints: (158,833)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
10/5/11 9:33 A

ZEALOUS23,

It's not uncommon to find yourself sore after a workout, especially if you are new to exercise. And many times the soreness may worsen a day or two afterward. That being said, open communication with your trainer is a must. Tell her/him what you experienced and your concern and see what she/he has to say or recommend.

I wish you well!
Coach Nancy



MOTIVATED@LAST
Posts: 13,970
10/5/11 8:25 A

It is not really so much, as it is how hard.

No, it's not uncommon do overdo things a bit when starting out, and feeling some muscle soreness as a result.

The best approach to muscle soreness is an 'active recovery' - ease back a bit, but keep working out. Increased blood flow to the muscles actually helps the healing and recovery process. Also, stretching should be gentle and held for 15-30 seconds, not straining to the full extent of your muscle, 'bouncing' or the like.

Tell your trainer that you want to back off the intensity a bit for a week or two until your body adapts to the new demands you are making on it. You want to build positive associations with exercise, not negative ones, and any good trainer will appreciate the feedback (unless you tell them, they don't know how you are feeling). If your trainer tells you something along the lines of "no pain, no gain" or just generally fails to adapt your workouts to your current level of fitness, it's time to get a new trainer.

M@L



LOISIA
SparkPoints: (3,124)
Fitness Minutes: (2,588)
Posts: 193
10/5/11 8:18 A

Usually when I'm sore, I exercise. I'm still sore after, but it's not as bad. It goes from that tight sore can't get out of bed feeling, to just being sore. It definately helps me. Can't say how much you should do because I don't know how much you did. But remember you are using body parts that you probably didn't even know you had (wink). Soreness is normal, and your going to feel it. Maybe slow down a little and build up. But don't give up!



ZEALOUS23
SparkPoints: (289)
Fitness Minutes: (159)
Posts: 2
10/5/11 6:37 A

Hi there,

I joined a gym couple days back and on the very first day the trainer made me do too many stretches after my cardio and the result was, well, I couldn't get out of the bed yesterday because of soreness and stiffness in whole body. Today, I'm feeling better and have recovered a little, but my ribs and my sides still hurt when I walk or cough. Iíll probably start again tomorrow, if I have recovered fully by then, that is.

I want to know if this is normal, i mean the soreness and all. I was too sore to even move. That means I must have overworked or maybe I didnít do the stretches properly because the trainer wasnít around.

Can anyone tell me how much cardio do I need to start with, taking into consideration the fact that Iíve never exercised before, except off course the 20-minute brisk walks around the neighborhood that Iíve been taking for about a week or so. I walk briskly but not as vigorously as one walks on a treadmill, so I guess that isnít much of a workout, even though I do break a sweat.

So how much cardio do I really need to begin with at the minimum (at the gym), making sure Iím not sore for the next two days?




 
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