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Hot Yoga vs. Running



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DRAGONCHILDE
SparkPoints: (54,986)
Fitness Minutes: (14,173)
Posts: 9,523
1/8/13 2:07 P

Yes, your heart rate elevates, but sweating and being hot do not actually burn an appreciably larger amount of calories. Your heart rate can substantially boost in any heat (as a resident of the deep south, I'm well aware of THAT fact!) but it doesn't translate to higher oxygen use by your muscles... which is basically what your HRM is designed to track. You are burning calories, yes, but it is not going to be that much more than regular yoga. If you are, it's because of the motion... NOT the heat. You don't burn more calories sitting in a sauna for the same reason. If that were possible, there wouldn't be any fat people in the south. ;) We sweat a LOT down here! Your elevated heart rate is your heart working harder, not your muscles. The heat is good for helping you get more deeply into the post, but it does not translate into higher calorie burn.

HRMs are calibrated for large muscle group movement and repetitive motion, cardio like running and biking. It doesn't translate well for things like strength training and yoga.

I am NOT saying it's not cardio, but you are not getting an accurate picture of the calories burned with your HRM.

Edited by: DRAGONCHILDE at: 1/8/2013 (14:09)


ARMARTIN527
SparkPoints: (15,395)
Fitness Minutes: (28,239)
Posts: 98
1/8/13 1:50 P

Yes, I read that article. But this is what I'm getting at regarding at:

"According to the text, "Thermal Effects on Cells and Tissues," BMR changes as a function of temperature. BMR will change by seven percent for each temperature change of 0.9 degrees Fahrenheit. Thus, when external conditions affect your body temperature, your body will burn more calories as it tries to compensate for the anomaly and restore your body to its normal temperature, increasing your BMR. This effect occurs in conditions of both heat and cold....

Your BMR reacts more slowly to external heat than it does cold. Short exposures to higher temperatures have little effect on your BMR. The text, "Basics of Clinical Nutrition," notes that your body's mechanisms to increase heat loss, such as perspiration, adjust for temperature increases and mitigate their effects on BMR. Prolonged heat exposure or an increase in internal temperature, however, can raise your BMR. For example, if you have a fever that is 3 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, your BMR will increase more than 20 percent."

But stick to the question of the OP...The answer probably depends on how hard and fast you run. Running for 90 minutes will most likely burn more fat and calories than hot yoga.



SERGEANTMAJOR
Posts: 6,353
1/8/13 12:55 P


Considering how heart rate monitors are designed and the algorithms are determined and set I have serious doubts that will provide anything close to an accurate reading during a yoga session. The algorithms are based on averages meaning that they will have a minimum degree of validity for 50% of a given population. Accurate calories expended values can only be determined by measuring oxygen consumption in a laboratory setting.

Functioning in a superheated atmosphere stresses the body according to extensive research. In the military a certain combination of heat and humidity factors causes the cessation of all physical activity for recruits due to the potential for heat injuries. There are no research based known benefits for exercising in a superheated environment.

On a final note, a European once noted that in the summer an American will go from their air conditioned home, to their air conditioned car to drive to their air conditioned office. At the end of the workday they drive their air conditioned car to a gym where they pay a monthly fee to go inside and break a sweat. Sweat is nothing more than the body's attempt to cool itself and measures nothing.



SPARK_COACH_JEN
Posts: 54,093
1/8/13 10:46 A

AR,

Here's a dailySpark blog that you might find interesting:

www.dailyspark.com/blog.asp?post=does_yoga
_count_as_cardio


Sweating is your body's cooling mechanism. It's not a function of calories burned.

Hope that helps,

Coach Jen



ARMARTIN527
SparkPoints: (15,395)
Fitness Minutes: (28,239)
Posts: 98
1/8/13 10:43 A

DRAGONCHILDE - you couldn't be more wrong. I am a Bikram Yogi and I've worn my HR monitor to class. In 90 minutes I burn at least 850 calories. And that's through cardio alone. Not to mention, your body is going to burn more when it's hot (a calorie is a measure of heat). So just sitting in the room sweating is burning calories as well.

I do it all for a complete body workout: Run, Bikram Yoga, and heavy weight lifting. I feel soooo much better when I can get more yoga in. So do both if time permits.



DRAGONCHILDE
SparkPoints: (54,986)
Fitness Minutes: (14,173)
Posts: 9,523
1/8/13 8:57 A

Since you adjust your diet based on the amount of calories you burn, it really doesn't matter which you do. However, yoga (even hot yoga) is not a big calorie burner. The benefits it provides are more for flexibility, pain reduction, and overall health. :)

That doesn't mean you shouldn't do it, just that if that's all you do, you will have an incomplete program. Strength training is important, even moreso, than cardio, and cardio is still important as well.





SPARK_COACH_JEN
Posts: 54,093
1/8/13 8:05 A

I think all of those activities can be included as part of a well-rounded exercise plan. The best exercise is the one you enjoy and can stick with long-term. Sweating is not necessarily an indicator of how hard you're working- some people just naturally sweat more than others. In general, I'd recommend cardio exercise 3-5 days per week and a full-body strength training workout 2-3 days per week.

Hope that helps,

Coach Jen



BAYLEIGHT
Posts: 19
1/8/13 12:48 A

Which is better for losing weight? Hot yoga, incorporating sweating and strength training, or running for intense cardio?



 
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