Author: Sorting Last Post on Top Message:
RUSSELL_40 Posts: 16,826
4/6/12 6:04 P

When we discuss good or bad calories, what we are usually talking about are foods that are trigger foods, and cause cravings. Something caused you to deviate from your plan, and eat the cereal, and bar. This food would only be bad for you, not all people.

I have to say that in The Complete Book of Food Counts, a 2.75" apple is 81 calories. Barring a candy coating, a 200 calorie apple would have to be the size of a soccer ball. This should probably be addressed. I think in general fruits and veggies are better than almost anything you could eat, except maybe eggs.

Corn is very high cal though. If it has no major effect on your blood sugar though, you might just want to limit it, not label it bad.

DRAGONCHILDE SparkPoints: (57,096)
Fitness Minutes: (14,252)
Posts: 9,646
4/6/12 1:09 P

Anarie often has a good way of looking at things. :) I like her perspective on just about everything!

ELI0704 SparkPoints: (531)
Fitness Minutes: (265)
Posts: 8
4/6/12 12:54 P

Wow i never thought of it this way

ANARIE Posts: 12,469
4/6/12 12:12 P

Think about your calories the way you think about your money. Some things are expensive but valuable, and some cheap things are a waste of money. For example, a good pair of fur-lined leather boots might cost $100 while plastic flip-flop sandals from WalMart are $5. But if you live in North Dakota and it's 20 below zero with a foot of snow on the ground, the price is irrelevant. You can't just buy the flip-flops, because they don't do the same job. If spending $100 on boots puts you over budget, you have a couple of choices. You can try to find cheaper boots (a smaller apple), you can do without something else that's less necessary (drop your cable or skip a snack), you can get a side job to increase your income (do more exercise), or you can just go ahead and spend the money on the understanding that it will take more time to save up for something else you want. (Going 100 calories over won't make you gain weight; it just means it will take longer to get to goal.)



MIZMAC4 SparkPoints: (25,512)
Fitness Minutes: (7,561)
Posts: 830
4/6/12 11:48 A

I agree about the food scale. Also the nutrition tracker has food in cup measurements. I always cup up my fruit into a measuring cup and track it that way.
You can buy smaller apples usually in a bag instead of the larger ones.

HOLISTICDETOXER SparkPoints: (32,314)
Fitness Minutes: (20,400)
Posts: 2,704
4/6/12 11:29 A

You might also feel better about your fruits and veggies if you invest in a food scale. I'm assuming you didn't eat the apple core, so try slicing the apple and weighing the amount that you'll actually eat. Enter the food into your tracker in grams.

THATHOTRUNRGRL Posts: 224
4/6/12 10:23 A

That must have been a really large apple if it was almost 200 cals! When you are looking up the nutrient values for your fruits and vegetables also look up what is considered "1 serving" of that particular food. It is likely that an apple that large was at least 1.5 servings of fruit, possibly closer to 2 servings. You may find that what you have been counting as 5 servings of fruits and veggies is actually considered 8-9 servings.

http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/list

Also, try eating more veggies than fruits. Fruits have more sugar than veggies (typically why we like them more) and therefore have more calories.

In the long run, occasionally going over your calorie range by 100 cals is no big deal, but if you are consistently going over by 100 cals that could slow down your progress. You don't have to be perfect, maybe some days you'll track your food and realize that if you ate another piece of fruit you will go over your range so you'll decide to stop and fall short on fruit/veggies for the day. The next day you cut something else out to make your fruit/veggie consumption a priority. Not all of us have the time to plan out our meals as well as we'd like, so you screw up, adjust, and move on. :)

NIRERIN Posts: 11,990
4/6/12 8:14 A

i agree that you should be looking at it as i ate 480 cals of cereal, bars and snacks today and went 85 cals over my range rather than the apple that was the final straw that tipped the scale. the 169 cals from the apple is nothing compared to the cereal, the fiber bar, the rice cake, and the cereal bar. personally i would say ditching the fiber one bar would be the first thing to do. you seem to have plenty of fruits and veggies in your diet. and that would save you 140 cals alone, plenty more than the 85 you went over.

PENGUINPIE Posts: 3,146
4/6/12 7:24 A

Well said, DRAGONCHILDE! You really put a point on it and made me think!

I eat a lot of fruits and veggies, usually 6+ servings a day. Those calories really add up (in a good way), but I use them to replace other foods rather than adding to them. For example, I will try to have fresh fruit with breakfast instead of jam/jelly or fruit juice. I'll have fresh chopped veggies as a snack instead of a bag of pretzels. I'll have two sides of veggies with dinner instead of one veggie and one starch. This way, I'm increasing the overall nutritional quality of the foods I eat without increasing the calorie count.

DRAGONCHILDE SparkPoints: (57,096)
Fitness Minutes: (14,252)
Posts: 9,646
4/5/12 11:42 P

A calorie's a calorie, no matter where it comes from. Apples contain fiber, potassium, buckets of vitamin C... and they're more filling than simple carbs in processed snacks. Don't think of something that's "almost" 200 calories as bad... there's no difference in getting 200 calories from an apple, or 200 from two cereal bars, as far as your waistline is concerned. It's the other passengers you should be more concerned about. Not to mention, NO added sugars, no preservatives, fat (good OR bad), high fructose corn syrup, or Red dye 40.

In this case, you ate a whole apple... that's just 169 calories... if you're concerned about eating that much at once (and you shouldn't be) cut it in half, and eat the rest of it later when you get the munchies. :)

Ingredients in an apple: APPLE.

Ingredients in that cereal bar?


CRUST: WHOLE GRAIN OATS, ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, VITAMIN B1 [THIAMIN MONONITRATE], VITAMIN B2 [RIBOFLAVIN], FOLIC ACID), WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, SOYBEAN OIL, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, SOLUBLE CORN FIBER, SUGAR, CALCIUM CARBONATE, WHEY, WHEAT BRAN, SALT, CELLULOSE, POTASSIUM BICARBONATE, MONO- AND DIGLYCERIDES, SOY LECITHIN, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, WHEAT GLUTEN, NIACINAMIDE, VITAMIN A PALMITATE, CARRAGEENAN, ZINC OXIDE, REDUCED IRON, GUAR GUM, VITAMIN B6 (PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE), VITAMIN B1 (THIAMIN HYDROCHLORIDE ), VITAMIN B2 (RIBOFLAVIN), FOLIC ACID. FILLING: HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, CORN SYRUP, STRAWBERRY PUREE CONCENTRATE, GLYCERIN, SUGAR, SODIUM ALGINATE, MODIFIED CORN STARCH, CITRIC ACID, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, DICALCIUM PHOSPHATE, METHYLCELLULOSE, CARAMEL COLOR, MALIC ACID, RED 40.

I think we both can tell which one's better for your body: 140 calories of a rather frightening science experiment... or 169 of something you at least can SEE what's involved?

It's all about perspective. :)

Edited by: DRAGONCHILDE at: 4/5/2012 (23:42)
ELENGIL SparkPoints: (21,248)
Fitness Minutes: (8,458)
Posts: 702
4/5/12 11:34 P

There's really no such thing as 'healthy' calories vs. 'unhealthy'. A calorie is a calorie.

I'd really wonder about that number, however. How did you enter it? If you have a scale, weight it out (minus the core, since you aren't eating that). I think the estimates on the nutrition tracker can be off depending on how one defines "medium", for example. Everyone has different ideas, that's why going by weight is much more accurate.

KATELYN_Y Posts: 42
4/5/12 11:31 P

DragonChilde--

Yeah, I definitely see what you mean. I actually plan out my eating the night before, and I hadn't planned on eating the cereal or cereal bar..those were slip-ups unfortunately :/. But I definitely see what you mean -- maybe the next time when I'm hungry and feel I'm going to eat outside my plan, I'll grab a fruit or veggie instead of the easy, carb-happy processed snacks.

But still - should I be concerned that an apple is almost 200 calories? Or does it not matter because they are "healthy calories"?

ELENGIL SparkPoints: (21,248)
Fitness Minutes: (8,458)
Posts: 702
4/5/12 11:25 P

Rather than looking at it like "If I eat an apple, I'll be over!" I'd say to look at what you *did* eat that got you that high in the first place. Try replacing some of what you're eating with fresh fruits and veggies throughout the day rather than trying to fit them in at the end when it's too late.

For instance, for lunch I had pita tacos: 4 oz ground beef and a cup of spinach, putting half of each in one full pita (two halves). That got me a serving of veggies right there. For dinner, 2 oz of penne pasta, 1/2 cup of low fat sauce, and a mix of red peppers, mushrooms and spinach with a dash of lemon juice and herbs.

See what you're eating during the day that's so calorie heavy that it's leaving you so little room for your veggies.

DRAGONCHILDE SparkPoints: (57,096)
Fitness Minutes: (14,252)
Posts: 9,646
4/5/12 11:23 P

100 calories over your range isn't too bad, so don't beat yourself up with it. I think that eating fruits and vegetables is fantastic! What I'd suggest is looking elsewhere in your range, and plan a bit more ahead of time to make room for those much-needed vitamins, minerals, and fiber!

I took a look at your nutrition tracker for today, and I do have some advice. While you do have a fairly balanced diet, I saw a couple places you could change your thinking on.

Maybe cut back on the snacks... instead of the cereal bar, reach for the apple, and you've saved yourself sugar, sodium, carbs, AND fat!

I think you're looking at the wrong part of your day for the culprit in going over your goal. Whenever possible, it's usually best to replace processed, prepackaged foods with fresh fruits and veggies. The end result will be much better. You're snacking a LOT on prepackaged stuff... I think maybe cutting back there would be wiser than cutting back on the fresh stuff. Cereal bars and cereal are great in moderation, but they're adding up to almost 400 calories over the course of your day. You ate less than that for breakfast!

Edited by: DRAGONCHILDE at: 4/5/2012 (23:24)
KATELYN_Y Posts: 42
4/5/12 11:12 P

Hey everyone! So one of my goals for eating healthier is to get 5 fruit & veggie servings a day. I've been doing alright with it, as I do really like the taste of most fruits and some veggies. However, I've noticed that some of these healthy foods are actually pretty high calorie! For example, I love apples and I know they're really good for you, but the large apple I had today was almost 200 calories!! And sometimes I find myself thinking, "Well, if i didn't eat that apple, I'd be in my calorie range"..which is definitely NOT the way I should be thinking - I shouldn't be cutting the healthy fruits and veggies in an effort to decrease my calorie intake. So I was wondering if any body else has been wondering this or has any feedback? We ARE supposed to track fruits and veggies, right? So, let's say I eat the apple (like I did today), but end up being almost 100 calories over my range. Should I brush that off because a bit of those calories came from fruits/veggies? Any input, Sparkies?

Page: 1 of (1)  




Other Diet and Nutrition Topics:

Topics: Last Post:
Strategy to stay strong when going to bed hungry 10/8/2013 1:10:47 PM
Acne Hel(l)p? 10/2/2013 5:14:16 PM
nutrition goals? 10/11/2013 7:05:59 PM
SEE WHAT HAPPENED ON "BIGGEST LOSER "? 11/14/2013 1:42:03 PM
Some new food ideas? 9/7/2013 9:41:59 PM

Diet Resources: bowflex 1090 dumbbells | theraband flexbar | thera band flexbar