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Grilling Vs. Baking



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ANARIE
Posts: 12,406
5/15/13 11:42 A

Language barrier!

"Grill" in other English-speaking countries is "broil" in the US. Unident's description is accurate if you translate "grill" as "broil." In most of the US, grilling means cooking on a grate over an open flame, usually outdoors.

There is some concern that grilling / barbecuing fatty meats may cause a slight increase in the risk of digestive cancers. They think that when the fat drips down onto the coals and burns, or when the fat itself gets charred, it might create small amounts of cancer-causing chemicals. But it's not a problem with lean meats, especially if you avoid actually charring it.





SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (128,429)
Fitness Minutes: (32,656)
Posts: 21,446
5/14/13 11:48 P

Here is a link that you may find helpful re recommended temps. for meat:
www.foodnetwork.com/recipes-and-cooking/me
at-and-poultry-temperature-guide/index
.html


BTW - I was a professional cook for a number of years, in a past life. There IS a difference - grilling CAN be from above or below - and is at a high temp. Think of over coals!! Baking is generally heat all around and at a lower temperature than grilling. Roasting starts at a higher temperature and when the meat is put into the oven, it is turned down. This allows the outside of the meats to sear quickly. Meat that is grilled can burn extremely quickly if not watched - even one minute can make a huge difference with a lot of cuts. That one minute can make a difference between dry and not very nice. Baking it is less likely to, but then we don't generally 'bake' a steak, but we grill a steak.

Kris



Edited by: SLIMMERKIWI at: 5/14/2013 (23:53)


YOJULEZ
SparkPoints: (15,605)
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Posts: 2,171
5/14/13 11:38 P

Like Unident mentioned, there isn't really a difference, provided you bake your meat on a rack set on a cookie sheet so the fat etc can drip off and the meat isn't sitting in it. But even then I think the difference is negligible.

I personally like grilling, because it adds a bit of extra flavor. When I bake I will sear on the stove first, then move into the oven, so I still get the crispier outside. Plus if you're grilling outside, there's less dishes to do :)

Edited by: YOJULEZ at: 5/14/2013 (23:39)


UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
5/14/13 11:23 P

Bake means 'heat from below'. Grill means 'heat from above'.

The only real difference is that when baking there's normally a metal oven tray between the heating element and the food, and when grilling there's not. This may result in higher temperatures when grilling, hence the prior warning on types of meat, but neither is "healthier", both are simply a way to heat meat.

In both cases, it is healthiest to place the meat on a raised tray, like a cookie cooling tray, so that the fat drips off and into the pan, and away from what you pull out of the pan and serve.

Incidentally, it's no less healthy to microwave, bbq or even pan fry (no oil in a non-stick pan) your meat! :) The difference is going to be whether it sits in its own juices while cooking and those fat and juices come with it when you serve.



BLOOGRL
SparkPoints: (10,382)
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Posts: 381
5/14/13 9:17 P

Oh, okay. I guess that makes sense. Next to try my hand at some of the recipes on here. Pay-day's thursday, so we'll see what happens!



SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (128,429)
Fitness Minutes: (32,656)
Posts: 21,446
5/14/13 8:59 P

IMHO, it doesn't really matter other than some cuts of meat don't lend themselves too much to grilling because they don't respond so well to the very high temperature or quickness.

Kris



BLOOGRL
SparkPoints: (10,382)
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5/14/13 8:54 P

Those all do sound like good ideas - I really want to extend my thanks for your ideas. (I never tried lamb or bison in my life though lol)

But, I still never got an answer to one of my questions...is it healthier to bake things or grill them? Or does it not really matter?

I really appreciate everyone's help!



EMILY0724
SparkPoints: (46,127)
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Posts: 1,970
5/14/13 9:24 A

Bison is super lean. use it the same as beef. It usually comes ground--so burgers, meatloaf, chili--anything you'd make with ground beef. Turkey is also a great alternative. Turkey burgers are one of my favorites! there are many recipe variations to change things up. The ground turkey is very loose, so you must add bread crumbs and an egg white to get it to stick together for a burger. there are several great chicken/turkey burger recipes on this site. and you can do so much more with chicken--chicken salad, grilled/baked chicken on a salad, chicken chili, --many, many alternatives to a grilled chicken breast!



CMCOLE
Posts: 2,667
5/14/13 6:59 A

lots of great suggestions, but the digital thermometer is an ideal one.
Also, if it bothers you, wear disposable gloves, and make sure your cook area is clean.

But as close to 'as came off the animal' is the way to go - as there are less surfaces for it to have been exposed to anything. Chop or grind it yourself, then, to get the cut you need



SLIMMERKIWI
SparkPoints: (128,429)
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5/14/13 3:31 A

Lean Pork is a wonderful meat and can be used in a lot of ways. It is also a very good source of Thiamine, and other nutrients. I LOVE pork steaks, coated in seasoned oat-bran and cooked in a hot pan, sprayed with a little Rice Bran Oil.

I also love Lean Sirloin Steak - marinated in a little Rice Bran Oil, Garlic Powder and Soy Sauce, and then fried in a hot pan with no extra oil. Lamb is another yummy cut. Just look for lean cuts of meat when you chose any. Rest steaks for about 5 minutes - it tenderizes them and they re-absorb all their juices. Most cuts a bit pink are absolutely fine. Some cuts rare are fine, too!

Kris



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
5/14/13 3:04 A

Anything is fine, as long as it's relatively lean, and preferably "as it came off the animal".

You really only need to worry about pathogens from undercooking with chicken, which you're already eating. Pork, beef, and lamb are all perfectly fine to eat a little less than cooked thoroughly through. In particular, I find beef and lamb very tasty just barely cooked!





ANARIE
Posts: 12,406
5/14/13 1:02 A

I was going to say exactly the same thing about the digital thermometer. In fact, if money's not a big issue, look for an instant-read like the Therma-Pen that the Cooks Illustrated testers use. You just poke it in the meat and you know the exact temperature. Pathogens are extremely heat-sensitive, and it's easy to find lists of the temperatures needed to kill everything. It's usually not as hot as you would think, so having that information should make you feel much better.

And as for cleaning things to avoid cross-contamination, hot soapy water really is the best germ killer. You can buy color-coded cutting boards and other kitchen tools, too, so meat never touches the same tools that you use for things that won't be cooked as hot.

although, remember also that you don't HAVE to have meat to be healthy. IMO you do need some animal products unless you're an expert dietitian, but if you use milk and/or eggs, you don't have to eat meat. If you really hate handling it, look for vegetarian dishes that have things in them that your family loves, and just don't bother mentioning that there's no meat. If you don't point it out, it's amazing how long it takes people to realize that they've been eating vegetarian.



YOJULEZ
SparkPoints: (15,605)
Fitness Minutes: (120)
Posts: 2,171
5/13/13 11:39 P

Boneless pork chops are a good alternative... some of the entries in the tracker for them are a bit wackadoo but there's some accurate ones. Or, try to look for ones in a package w/ nutrition information.

Another good one is pork tenderloin. It is a larger cut so it's probably enough for at least 3 servings, but it's very lean. It's super good baked in the oven with simple marinades, or even just slathered in dijon mustard and some herbs. This recipe is very good: budgetbytes.blogspot.com/2012/11/soy-dijon
-pork-tenderloin-782-recipe.html
I calculated it as 436 calories for a 6oz serving including the pan sauce....but I eat large meat servings now in maintenance. 4oz would be 290, and would be less if you skip the optional pan sauce.

Beef is OK, but it is higher in calorie/fat so you don't get as much as you do with chicken. But, you can still have it.

I would also highly suggest you invest in a digital meat thermometer. Target sells them for $10-15. That way you can check for sure that the meat is done to help alleviate your anxieties without cooking the bejesus out of the meat :)

Edited by: YOJULEZ at: 5/13/2013 (23:47)


BLOOGRL
SparkPoints: (10,382)
Fitness Minutes: (2,093)
Posts: 381
5/13/13 11:17 P

Alright, first off, I'd like to say I'm a bit of a germaphobe. Okay, I AM. Preparing raw meat, every time I do it, causes me great anxiety that I'm going to not cook it correctly/all the way/I'm going to get salmonella/parasites/something else that could kill me or make me very ill, etc.

With that in mind, I also DESPERATELY want to be healthy/happy/lose weight effectively. I'm following spark people's suggested caloric intake and dinner always seems to be the same for me - boneless, skinless chicken breast with either a baked potato or green beans, corn, broccoli, cauliflower or a low sodium heart-healthy cat of soup (sometimes a mixture of these). However....I'd like to try different meats.

What is healthier? Cooking on a foreman? (I plan on investing on a decent one, not a cheapie...but nothing too outrageous - I only work part time and go to school after all so the income is low). I HATE seafood...so before you mention that, lol...save yourself from bothering. Now...besides low-calorie chicken...what other meats would you recommend I cook to "spice up" my dinners? I really love chicken, but "one cannot simply live on chicken alone". It's unrealistic. I'd like to try boneless pork chops - would those be healthy grilled and/or baked without breading? What about steaks? I hear those are good. I'm just a complete idiot when it comes to cooking and I get scared everytime I touch raw meat that I'm going to infect someone or something with the germs. :(

HELP! Give me healthy meat choices I can incorporate with my veggies that won't be too complicated for a cook who can...only follow a recipe.



 
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