Author: Sorting Last Post on Top Message:
MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,287
3/15/13 1:53 A

Warm up and cool downs are exercise, and it's absolutely legitimate to track them as such.

Of course, it is presumably at a lower intensity than the main part of your workout, so you probably want to track it seperately. 4 minutes of warm up and cool down, and then 60 minutes of working out, as seperate items.

This would seem to account for 30-40 calories out of the discrepancy you mention.

M@L

SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (158,833)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
3/14/13 6:51 P

Just to add my two cents on warm-ups and cool downs--I absolutely count them. They are an important part of your exercise experience. When my running coach has me do a 50 minute fartlek run, he includes a 10 minute warm-up and 10 minute cool down for a total time of 70 minutes. They count.

Coach Nancy

RAVELGIRLY SparkPoints: (48,019)
Fitness Minutes: (25,341)
Posts: 455
3/14/13 6:48 P

Coach Nancy, thanks! I will start saving for a Polar HRM.

RAVELGIRLY SparkPoints: (48,019)
Fitness Minutes: (25,341)
Posts: 455
3/14/13 6:46 P

M@L, your post gives me food for thought, thank you.

I didn't record my warm ups or cool downs for today's workouts. If I divide 600 cal by the 64 minutes I was actually moving, the HRM estimates 9 calories per minute. I thought I wasn't supposed to include warm up and cool down minutes in my fitness minutes. Am I wrong about that?



SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (158,833)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
3/14/13 6:42 P

Hi,

If I had to choose--I would recommend a Polar brand. The reason--they have longevity in the market. They were the first company to bring the HRM to the home market over 30 years ago, not to mention they tend not to get the outside interference from other monitors or electronic equipment.

Coach Nancy

RAVELGIRLY SparkPoints: (48,019)
Fitness Minutes: (25,341)
Posts: 455
3/14/13 6:37 P

Thank you for the reply, Coach Nancy. I'll bear in mind that these are just estimates. I enjoy using a HRM when I exercise because it reminds me to keep working hard.

What HRMs have you found to be most accurate?

Edited by: RAVELGIRLY at: 3/14/2013 (18:39)
MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,287
3/14/13 6:33 P

Online calculators such as Spark is pretty reasonable at exercise where the intensity can be objectively measured (eg. running and walking). For aerobic exercise more generally, it uses broad averages of intensity for that kind of exercise. For exercise where you are working out against the resistance of the machine rather than your own bodyweight (eg. elliptical, stationary bike) it is less accurate.

If you know the average heart rate during your workout, you could check it against www.shapesense.com/fitness-exercise/calcul
ators/heart-rate-based-calorie-burn-ca
lculator.aspx


However, heart rate is not always a perfect predictor of calories burned - high blood pressure and some medications can lead to a faster heart rate than the exercise really warrants.

My general advice would be to go with the more conservative of the two estimates.

Another reality check is the fact that only very fit people can sustain figures of above 10-12 calories per minute for any length of time, and figures above 14 calories per minute are extremely suspect. (Although it is possible to maintain higher burn rates for shorter periods eg. 10-20 minutes)

M@L

SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (158,833)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
3/14/13 6:21 P

Hi RAVELGIRLY,

All calorie calculators and HRMs are just estimates of calories burn. They use an algorthim and base the final reading based on the feedback (age, weight, height, gender and in the case of a HRM, your heart rate). Heart rate alone is not a factor in calories expended. When you begin to exercise your body demands a greater percentage of oxygen to fuel the muscles. This demand leads to an increase in heart rate which is why heart rate monitors can determine calories burn.

For most people a HRM is a better indicator of calorie burn as you have that added feature of measuring your heart rate. However, I do want to caution you that it is just an estimation. Some HRMs are not as accurate as others, as well as interference from other HRMs and electronic equipment can affect the final number.

I hope this helps!

Coach Nancy

RAVELGIRLY SparkPoints: (48,019)
Fitness Minutes: (25,341)
Posts: 455
3/14/13 5:49 P

I have a cheap heart rate monitor - it's a wrist unit (no chest strap, just contact plate on underside of watch). It only tracks heart rate when you press a button. The manual says that if you check your heart rate frequently during your workout, it will adjust calorie burn accordingly. Today I paused and checked HR repeatedly during my workout.

Sparkpeople says I burned approx 480 calories during my workout but my heart rate monitor says I burned approx 600. I'm wondering which number to trust. How does sparkpeople come up with calories burned numbers for exercise?

Page: 1 of (1)  




Other Fitness and Exercise Topics:

Topics: Last Post:
Biking in cold weather 10/29/2013 9:24:27 AM
Unbalanced strength training routine? 10/1/2013 1:24:09 AM
Question about "Find Your Perfect Weight - Part 1" 12/4/2013 2:11:33 PM
Arthritis and Arm Sleeves 11/30/2013 3:31:25 PM
Can I? 10/5/2013 1:05:25 PM

Diet Resources: post workout | pre workout | workout equipment