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WHOLENEWME79 Posts: 940
3/1/13 2:15 P

For about 4 months I traveled from Denver to Raton, NM for school once a week and the hotel I stayed at had only a microwave and fridge in the room and no kitchen at all in the hotel (really, it had no amenities at all). I would take lots of yogurt, lunch meat and bread, or I would fix something I could freeze, like soups or curries, make individual servings and keep them in the fridge so I could just pop them in the microwave for a few minutes. I always had fruit that could be left out- oranges, apples, bananas, etc for snacks, and granola bars for snacks. I actually really like cucumber so I would have a cucumber with vinegar or ranch to munch on, too.

Try to pick the best possible options- Whole grain bread, instant oatmeal, low sodium lunch meat (if you get it at the deli it is generally cheaper than the prepackaged stuff, depending on the brand), seasonal fruit. If you go the granola bar route, be sure to check the labels, as some brands are really high in sugar and salt. I like the Cascadian Farms brand, or Kashi.

Another item I found I rather liked are sugar snap peas. You can buy them individually or in bags and just munch on them. Crunchy and sweet are a winning combination, at least to me.

YOJULEZ SparkPoints: (15,605)
Fitness Minutes: (120)
Posts: 2,171
3/1/13 1:58 P

Do you have a microwave in your truck too, or just the fridge?

OCEANSANDSEAS Posts: 266
3/1/13 1:52 P

I think it does!

PKTRUCKDRIVER SparkPoints: (2,491)
Fitness Minutes: (1,738)
Posts: 78
3/1/13 1:51 P


WOW, Many thanks to all

1st I am not using or never will use HCG, not me


And for my B&G, it is only once in awhile and portioned for 4 meals

Watermelon, my most favorite, fruit, love it, and most other fruit except grapefruit

Nuts , exspensive but then almonds raw yuck, but flavored almonds cool
cashews raw ok, but pricey

beans cool, lentils black/red/navy/lima/greenpea all great, and I love my 7qt ccrockpot, but can only make so much split pea soup, love my carrots and celery in my stew or pot roast's, even do the corn beef once in awhilee, thou I tend to use ginger ale and honey/brown sugar too, but always carrot and potatoes, no cabbage, never...ughh

patrick

PS still need real help with a menu I can take with me on the road in my truck, and yes I have a mini fridge , please

DMJAKES Posts: 1,590
3/1/13 1:36 P

Pitch the HCG, please. You've gotten a lot of good advice, but I'd second the notion that if you have access to one, make a few appointments with an RD (registered dietician). An RD can be a great help in figuring out how to structure meals to meet your medical needs.

Do you like oatmeal? It's a great breakfast food, very filling and good for you. The biscuits and gravy should probably be reserved for a once in a while treat, not a regular part of your daily diet. You can also make waffles or pancakes using whole wheat flour and smearing with a bit of fruit spread instead of syrup (yummo). Even some of the cold cereals wouldn't be a bad choice to keep things interesting. Greek yogurt and a piece of fruit might do the trick too.

You can do this...look how far you've come already!

Are you able to do any exercise at all, even walking? That will help you feel better.

WHOLENEWME79 Posts: 940
3/1/13 1:09 P

Wow, you have lost so much already! Great job!

You said you don't like vegetables, but what about fruit? you know, things like watermelon, strawberries, bananas, etc? Those are easy to incorporate and really, really cheap if you buy seasonal. You could have your biscuits and gravy, and add a side of fruit, like a banana or some grapes. You could keep apples and oranges with you for snacks, too. You can eat a lot of fruit and not rack up a lot of calories, plus they have fiber, vitamins and are low in fat.

As others have mentioned, are there ways to get some sort of veggie in you? Do you like pasta with tomato sauce, for example? Making your own is cheap and healthy. Beef or turkey burgers and add a tomato slice and some avocado? Start small and work your way up, basically.

What about things like whole grains? Would you eat oatmeal, or whole grain pancakes? Yogurt or cottage cheese? On the sparkrecipes site there are lots of great, "slimmed down" recipes for things like biscuits, gravy, etc. Maybe give some of those a try. If your wife or family is on board, ask them to make something from that site and not tell you it is from sparkpeople. I did that with my husband to show him healthy foods can taste good, and it really worked.

Considering you have a health condition, I would really strongly suggested speaking with your regular physician before starting something so extreme like the HCG diet. I know it sounds great, but my doctor told me I was putting my life on the line when I asked him about it because of my heart problems (HBP and arrythmias) and my history of depression. So please be cautious with something like that, especially if it is not medically supervised by a physician who knows you.

Best of luck! You can do this!

Edited by: WHOLENEWME79 at: 3/1/2013 (13:10)
SPKRAUSE Posts: 543
3/1/13 12:46 P

Ditto on what YOJULEZ said.

For me, portion control was most of it. I had less to lose than you, but I took off about a hundred pounds last year mainly through portion control; I already cooked for myself and had for years, and *what* I was eating was pretty good, it was mainly a matter of *how much*.

But before that I'd made the decision to change what I eat, including more vegetables, fewer pre-packaged and similar items, etc.

On liking or not liking veggies, I'm a bit on the fence. On the one hand, if you don't like something, no one is *forcing* you to eat them or it, especially if your doctor hasn't said that you must eat a certain way. And there's always the matter of food allergies and intolerances, things you cannot eat. Personal choice, blah blah blah. But bad choices are still bad choices, even if it's our choice, our 'right'. And we're lucky to live in a country in which we can be picky and choose not to eat something because it doesn't float our boat.

Many if not most food dislikes are not due to something inherent in the food item or inherent in us (e.g. a genetic predisposition not to like a given flavor, though some of those exist, or being a super taster, being highly sensitive to certain things, etc.); most of the time it's a matter of personal history and experience -- how foods are prepared, associations we have with foods (that one time mom over-boiled the brussels sprouts, that time you ate X and got food poisoning and can't even look at X without feeling nauseated, that grains of white rice remind you of maggots, that mushrooms are often slimy and you don't like slimy, and so on). That also means we can get over these aversions. We can learn and change. And if you change the foods you like / dislike, what makes you think you can change your eating habits long-term? So I put it to myself.

And as for portion control and *types* of foods ... I can get all the good fats, protein, and fiber I need for no more than 1200 calories a day, and given a good supply of nuts, fruit, and vegetables in there, I know I'm also getting enough vitamins and minerals, meaning I have the rest of my daily allowance -- up to, say, 2000 calories, to fill in with whatever I want. And I don't feel 'hungry'. I do have appetite. Portion control and calorie control works because my nutritional needs are being met in that limited range ... if I *needed* 2500+ calories to reach my non-caloric nutritional needs (fats, protein, vitamins and minerals ...), I'd be malnourished if I tried to just control my poritions. Carbs are good, carbs are energy, and your brain needs carbs, but empty carbs won't satiate and they may not help with your non-caloric nutritent needs.

DIDS70 Posts: 5,070
3/1/13 12:18 P

I don't really portion control veggies since I eat them raw. I do watch the amount of healthy oils and nuts that i eat. Fruit though good, I watch for the sugar contents. I am more concerned about getting in my nutrition than portions.

ICEDEMETER Posts: 816
3/1/13 12:05 P

Sounds like you're wanting to work with portion control on a low fibre diet. Portion control (calories out exceed calories in) will work regardless of what the calories are, but there can be issues with missing nutrition. Juicing is one option for getting nutrients from fruits and vegetables without the fibre.

I'm wondering whether your choice of low fibre is on a doctor's recommendation or not. If it isn't, please be aware that while it may seem to make your life easier with one medical condition, it can contribute to other medical conditions (diverticulosis, diverticulitis, high cholesterol, etc.). A lack of insoluble fibre can also cause constipation, which is what I'm assuming you are trying to avoid.

I've had a couple of major surgeries, am missing half my colon, and now have a honking big incisional hernia, so I think I get where you are coming from. My personal experience, working from my doctor's recommendations, is that starting from a low fibre BRAT (bananas, white rice, apple sauce, white toast) diet and very gradually upping the fibre intake to the recommended 25-35g per day was what I needed to get my digestive system working semi-normally again. When I say very gradually, I mean over 6 months, and with a very high water intake.

I also make sure that I have a lot of soluble fibre included, to keep things to a reasonable speed, shall we say... The easiest to read list of soluble vs insoluble fibre that I've found is an older one, but I've found it to be a great quick reference as I was adding fibre:
huhs.harvard.edu/assets/file/ourservices/s
ervice_nutrition_fiber.pdf


The previous posters are absolutely right that starting with portion control is a great thing. Once you've got that under control, then starting to increase nutrition and fibre (preferably with the aid of a doc and / or dietician) might be something that you want to consider. You may find, like I did, that increasing fibre actually made everything work better. It's a bit scary to consider (ok, really scary - I'm more afraid of constipation than anything else), but it really can make things better.

Great work on your successes so far, and good luck with carrying on to the next steps.

BERKANA_T Posts: 138
3/1/13 11:44 A

Portion control has been important for me, at least in the 'measuring how much I'm eating' sort of way. I also found that serving myself smaller portions and eating them slowly helped me stop eating when I was full, rather than overeating because there was food still on my plate that I loved, or because I ate so fast that my brain didn't have time to register that my stomach was full.

There are ways to 'hide' veggies in your meals, although breakfast is a littler harder. Grated veggies disappear in chili or meatloaf, for example. Cooked and mashed veggies can be added to homemade bread dough. Cauliflower can be cooked and blended into a cream based soup. In fact, soups and stews are my favourite ways to get more veggies into my family's diet.

Have you thought about why you don't like veggies? My daughter detests the texture of cooked veggies, but will happily munch on anything raw. My SO will only eat veggies that are cooked with a little crunch still in them. I find that veggies from a can have an odd after taste. One of my friends refuses to eat her mother's veggies because she cookes them to mush. There are a LOT of different ways to prepare veggies, and a lot of different ways to add flavour to them. They're an important part of a healthy diet, and you may really want to start experimenting until you find some ways to include them.

How do you feel about fruit? We eat a lot of fruit in my house, mostly because I have a couple of picky eaters. There are always apples and oranges available for everyone to snack on, and when I can I pick up various berries, bananas, or whatever else is (relatively) in season. Roasted grapefuit is a wonderful addition to a healthy breakfast, for example. And fruit based smoothies can be great on the go snacks.

YOJULEZ SparkPoints: (15,605)
Fitness Minutes: (120)
Posts: 2,171
3/1/13 11:25 A

To an extent, yes. For me, the key to losing weight was both portion control, and healthier choices. I did portion control first, then worked on the nutrition side of things.

I think so far you're doing great, by working on your portion sizes. But eventually you will need to make some healtheir choices. Like the biscuits and gravy... there's not much nutritional value there. Again, it's great you're working on getting used to eating smaller portions, because that's really the first step. But eventually maybe you can find substitutes for that.

For example, you could make your own breakfast sandwiches with whole grain english muffins with eggs and a bit of cheese. You can make like 5 at a time and keep in the fridge, and just heat in the microwave each morning. You could also add in turkey sausage to make it even more filling.

Or, you could just have eggs (use egg whites from 2 eggs, and 1 full egg w/ yolk and scramble) with some turkey (or even regular!) bacon, and a slice of whole wheat toast, but skip the biscuits. In your egg scramble, maybe you can try adding in some veggies that way... broccoli cut up really small, or red bell pepper.

As for veggies, I used to think I didn't like them at all either. But I knew I needed to eat them so I experimented with different ways of making them. I used to HATE green beans, because all I ever had was the salty mushy canned ones. But now they're my favorite, either sauteed in a pan with a bit of olive oil (sometimes I even use a bit of bacon fat, a little goes a long way) and shallots (or onions), or I roast them in the oven for about 10 minutes with some olive oil, salt & pepper, then top with a bit of parmesan cheese. They're SO delicious that way, trust me. I also make broccoli and asparagus that way.

One last question, do you have medical insurance? If you do, because you have so much to lose, maybe your doctor can refer you to a dietician, who can help you figure out a good menu plan.

Edited by: YOJULEZ at: 3/1/2013 (11:25)
BRANDIW7 SparkPoints: (32,232)
Fitness Minutes: (25,379)
Posts: 34
3/1/13 11:24 A

I think, at first, just cutting down the portion size of things you are already eating is a good step. Maybe once you are used to that, you can start tracking and see where your calories are at every day. Then you could start looking at what additional changes should be made in your diet to get closer to your suggested calorie range.

I know you say you don't like vegetables, but if there is any way that you can incorporate them in your diet, you should. They help fill me up, and I feel full longer.



PKTRUCKDRIVER SparkPoints: (2,491)
Fitness Minutes: (1,738)
Posts: 78
3/1/13 11:11 A

Okay we got HCG, the 500 calories diet, this scares me .but let me explain why.

I am 414lbs right now, down from 505lbs, cool yeah, but now I have a medical condition I am not allowing to hold me back, but try to work with and still lose weight , till I can have the surgery needed to fix it , and I will in time, if I can continue losing weight and convince myself I can get back in the truck and be totally safe driving all day, VERY IMPORTANT TO ME .

I am currently trying to eat foods that , forgive me, go through me quickly and easy, and I am not into veggies at all, childish I know, but it is the truth, and the truth needs to be told , right?

Calories are going to counted when I can establish some form of regularity of the menu I will be using, hopefully keeping calories under 2000 or so, remember I am a big guy, not trying lose 10lbs, but 100's of pounds.

Idea's here would be great, I am doing more breakfast foods than normal, as it was always my best and most enjoyable meal, and it would be awesome to mentally be able to keep it , but just portion it small enough to cover the hunger and also fulfill the comfort sensation too.

Is this asking too much, God I hope not.

Instead of 4 biscuits and gravy with 3 eggs and hashbrowns with toast , and maybe sausage and or ham.

I now have 2 smaller biscuits with small amount of gravy, and once in awhile 2 eggs, nothing more, it is cheap to make, last for 3-4 days, and goes thru quickly.

Well let me see if I get any response as I have some much needed questions I could use help with, PLEASE

Patrick

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