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Chicken?



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LARABIOSA
Posts: 6
10/6/11 12:09 A

I've only made one whole chicken in my entire adult life, did not end well. You ask a good question LAETU5. I had to look it up. This is what I found:

Whole mature chickens are marketed in the United States as fryers, broilers, and roasters. Fryers are the smallest size (2.5-4 lbs dressed for sale), and the most common, as chicken reach this size quickly (about 7 weeks). Most dismembered packaged chicken would be sold whole as fryers. Broilers are larger than fryers. They are typically sold whole. Roasters, or roasting hens, are the largest chickens commonly sold (3-5 months and 6-8 lbs) and are typically more expensive.

Who knew? So it might state it on the label, or you can likely figure out the type based on weight.

I know it's probably better for the environment, cheaper and more nutritious to make whole chicken... but dang those frozen little breast cutlets are sooooo convenient. You've inspired me to think more about it :P



LAETU5
Posts: 1,405
10/5/11 10:46 P

all the chicken I've ever bought all look the same (other than varying in size). I don't know the difference between the fryers and the roasters; I usually just get the small ones because they fit in the crock pot better.

Maybe it's the breasts that look deformed to you? Most chickens these days have been bred to have extra large breast meat....that may be something that you didn't come across form amish raised chickens and why they appear deformed to you.



SCTK519
Posts: 2,085
10/5/11 10:41 P

I just buy the bag of frozen chicken breasts from the grocery store. It'll tell you on the packaging whether it's breast, tenderloin, thigh, etc.



KELEKONA
Posts: 605
10/5/11 8:48 P

I finally figured out that I need to get the fryers instead of the roasters when buying chicken... I grew up where most of our chickens came from amish country, and I was shocked at how deformed some of the chickens in this region looked.

Is there some sort of official marking I should look for to get normal looking chickens? Or do I need to get better at distinguishing chicken shapes through the packaging?



 
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