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DIETITIANBECKY Posts: 26,658
2/4/12 5:25 P

To the original poster.
These are my questions regarding your post.
1. I assume you mean that you were burning 5000 calories a week, not a day.
2. I have been playing with various numbers, and I don't think our SP program would give anyone a 1200-1550 calorie range when 5000 calories burned weekly through exercise is entered.

So...I am really confused by your post, and wondering if everything was entered accurately in the beginning. Can you share more about what you initially entered, so I can check more: gender, age, height, weight,


SP Dietitian Becky

Edited by: DIETITIANBECKY at: 2/4/2012 (17:31)
ANARIE Posts: 12,464
2/4/12 4:21 P

When you change anything, the computer looks at everything. When you changed your exercise goal, it took a second look at your weight loss rate and your goal date and readjusted everything so you won't lose faster than you said you wanted to.

Does that make better sense? As long as you left all your settings alone, it didn't notice that you were moving faster than you said you wanted to, but the goal adjustment "woke it up."

AWILLAFOR SparkPoints: (4,320)
Fitness Minutes: (7,090)
Posts: 13
2/4/12 3:56 P

Thanks. I cut back to 3000 calorie burn a week because 30-45 minutes seems more doable in the long term than the hour and a half that I was doing. I have been losing an average of 1-2 pounds a week with several weeks of no loss, and one of weight gain. I understand that it's a slow process. I did this 7 years ago and got 30 pounds from my goal weight & quit. I shot back up to my obese size in under a year and have only been working on getting it off again since late August, early September of 2011. My long term goal is just to get back to a healthy BMI. I don't really care how long it takes. I just didn't understand why it said I should be eating more now that I'm working out less. It didn't make sense to me. I appreciate the info you provided.

UNIDENT Posts: 33,498
2/4/12 3:30 P

Any change isn't based on the change you just made, but on your goals as a whole. If you had lost weight faster than originally planned, then when you made this change you now have less weight to lose every week to reach the same goal, so would receive a higher range.

Frankly, if you had 5,000 calories of exercise weekly inputted and got 1200-1550 on that, you're trying to lose too much too quickly. Your body won't support that kind of loss.

Perhaps you should adjust your goal to be more realistically slow, and you will then receive a range that is more appropriately responsive to exercise changes.

As a general guideline:

Morbidly obese people can lose 2lb/week
Obese people can lose 1lb/week
Overweight people can lose 1/2 lb/week
People already in a healthy weight range looking to lose just a little might expect even less than that, on average.

Consider your goal - is it unrealistically fast?

AWILLAFOR SparkPoints: (4,320)
Fitness Minutes: (7,090)
Posts: 13
2/4/12 1:47 P

At the start of this diet & exercise program Sparkpeople calculated that if I worked out 5000 calories a day, I should eat 1200-1550 calories a day. I did this and it was working for me. This week I decided to cut back on the hours that I am working out. I wanted to bring it down to a more manageable level. I'm now burning 3000 calories per week and for some reason I am now being instructed to eat 1500-1900 calories a day. Does this make sense to anyone? I've decreased my workouts, why on earth am I suddenly supposed to be eating more? I have been posting my workouts all along. All I did was go in and update that I am decreasing my workouts. Nothing else changed. Can anyone explain this?

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