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Calorie Goal Makes Me Nervous...



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RUSSELL_40
Posts: 16,745
11/9/12 10:27 A

I doubt anyone here gained a bunch of weight by eating 100 extra calories a day.

This is an irrational fear, and I would recommend eating the 1400, just to show yourself that you can still lose weight at that level. Eventually, you will have to increase the calories you eat as you get to goal weight. If 1400 makes you nervous, what will happen if maintenance is 1800 calories? Technically, 1.25 lbs loss a week, is created by making a 4,375 calorie deficit every week, or 625 calories a day.So at GW, you would need to eat those calories. Even assuming your overall needs would drop some.. 1800 calories wouldn't be a stretch. Especially if your exercise increase as you lose weight. You need to get past the numbers.

We all remember 3000-5000 calorie days, where we had picnics, or pizza, or ice cream, and THAT is why we are overweight. NOT 100 calories. I recently reset my trackers, and with increased exercise, found out my range was 2,470-2,820. I had the same reaction( OMG ), but it is working. Not only am I still losing, albeit slower, I no longer cheat every couple of days. That was a 1000 calorie bump to my menu.

I think you will find out that 1400 will be fine , if you just try it out. Expanded calories will allow more variety, and you will enjoy it more.



UNIDENT
Posts: 33,498
11/9/12 2:47 A

Also, factor in that Spark assumes "average" person. It's quite likely I imagine (please correct me if I'm wrong) that a wheelchair user would be on average less active in the day and burn less calories than someone who walks.

This would mean Spark's figures for you personally can easily be more than is actually realistic for you.

Previously you lost 1.5lbs a week on almost 1300 intake. That meant you were making a daily deficit of around 700 calories. So eating 1400 would still be deficit for you. It means you, at that time at least, would have needed to eat 2,000 calories daily just to maintain, before even thinking about gaining!

So don't be so scared of 1400+. While it may or may not be feasible for you given your wheelchair (and you'll have to experiment on that to see), you can rest assured it's never going to be a gain or fail to lose value for you because you lost so much weekly on so close a previous value.



AGAINSTTHEODDS
Posts: 4
11/8/12 8:09 P

Nah, I didn't feel deprived at 1300, so it should be okay. I guess I will change my rate and just remember that I don't actually plan to lose that fast. Thanks so much!



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,374
11/8/12 8:07 P

I imagine it is a combination of the slower rate of weight loss weekly and perhaps the higher body weight.
I would plug in the program a 2 pound/week loss---this will then give you a range of 1200-1550. So you can use that 1300-1400 again; but with some flexibility on either end. Yes, you may lose slightly more at the beginning, but I imagine it will slow as you progress.

I assume you did not feel deprived on 1300-1400??
Dietitian Beckyu



AGAINSTTHEODDS
Posts: 4
11/8/12 7:53 P

So. The last time I lost weight here, my calorie goal was 1250-1550(ish)..and I almost NEVER ate about 1300, because I'm super short and use a wheelchair.. With this, I lost 45lbs in 8 months (about 1.5lb a week), and I was super happy with that.

Now, however, I've set myself to lose less weight a week (1.25lbs), and it's increased my calories to 1400 minimum, and I have to admit, that scares me. I'm more than happy to lose my weight over a course of 2 years (that's what it looks like it will take), but I'm scared that 1400 cal minimum is going to be too high. Could it be that I'm 20lbs heavier at my starting weight this time that's making the difference?



 
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