Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

 
Message Boards
FORUM:   Diet and Nutrition
TOPIC:  

2000 calorie diet



Click here to read our frequently asked Diet and Nutrition questions.

 
 
Search the
Message Boards:
Search
      Share
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Author: Message: Sort First Post on Top


LAVHUGSNY
Posts: 3,527
11/3/12 5:31 P

Thanks for the info, you both have clarified my question......

Barbara



DIETITIANBECKY
Posts: 26,427
11/3/12 5:31 P

If you want a little interactive video that reviews the food label, calories and % daily values; check out "Label Man":
www.accessdata.fda.gov/videos/CFSAN/HWM/hw
mintro.cfm

Dietitian Becky



AM_MORRIS87
Posts: 703
11/3/12 5:20 P

No no, when they say "based on a 2000 calorie diet" they are referring to the recommended daily value percentages of macros. The fat, carbs, protein, vitamins, etc.

So when it says Carbohydrates- 43g .... ___% of DV, they are saying that the recommended daily value is based off of someone who eats a 2000 calorie diet. So whether you require more or less than 2000 calories, that's what will change the daily value. Because someone who eats 1400 calories vs 2400 calories won't require the same amount of macros.

The calories in the serving are the same for everyone. :)

Edited by: AM_MORRIS87 at: 11/3/2012 (17:22)


CHESAPEAKE60
SparkPoints: (3,699)
Fitness Minutes: (1,945)
Posts: 396
11/3/12 5:14 P

??? I have have never seen that on nutritional info. The only way that would make sense is if they were giving percentages of daily intake. Like if something had 200 calories, they might say it had 10% of your recommended calories for the day based on a 2000 calorie daily intake.

Otherwise it wouldn't make any difference what your calorie range was. 200 calories consumed is 200 calories consumed.

Unless I am missing something here - which certainly has been known to happen.....

Edited by: CHESAPEAKE60 at: 11/3/2012 (17:15)


LAVHUGSNY
Posts: 3,527
11/3/12 4:44 P

Reading the amount of calories on the foods,it always says based on a 2000 calorie intake. So if yogurt says it has 100 calories in it based on a 2000 diet and I eat 1400 calories does that make the 100 calories stated on the label more or less for my 1400 calories ?

Am I making sense or what ? Thanks for your help.

Barbara



 
Page: 1 of (1)  
Search  



Share


 
Diet Resources: vitamin k benefits | vitamin k deficiency | niacin foods