Which is Better: A Doughnut or Skipping Breakfast?

65SHARES

By: , SparkPeople Blogger
8/9/2013 6:00 AM   :  241 comments   :  186,374 Views

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We recently had a dailySpark team-brainstorming meeting. As we tossed around blog topics and ideas, Coach Nicole had a question that caught all of our attention. She asked, "If someone is running late in the morning, is it better to grab a doughnut on the go or skip breakfast?" I said it was better to grab the doughnut. I think my answer surprised her. Why would a doughnut be a better choice you ask?

No doubt, you have heard it said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. One reason is that it "breaks the fast" since your last meal or snack. The body uses less energy as you rest but energy is still used to run the body (circulation, nerve impulses, respiration, etc) as you sleep. Eating shortly after you arise in the morning tells your body to wake up from its slower conservation mode, allowing your metabolic rate to return to normal. Waiting hours to eat causes the metabolic rate to remain slow. The longer you go until you eat and the more active you are, the slower the metabolic rate can become to compensate and ensure adequate energy is available.

Eating breakfast is also important when trying to reach personal weight loss goals. One explanation for this is skipping breakfast causes the brain to crave high-calorie foods. It might be the reason people crave the doughnut while they are driving to work on an empty stomach. It can also be the reason people are drawn to high calorie, high fat lunches when they skip breakfast. In any case, eating a less than ideal breakfast is better than no breakfast at all. An average strawberry frosted doughnut contains about 240 calories, 33 grams of carbohydrates, 10 grams of fat and 3 grams of protein. It can take more than 40 minutes to walk off those sweet calories. While it isn't the best breakfast choice, if we look at a doughnut a little closer we find there is more balance than we might think. A recommended daily energy intake of 1500 calories consumed in three meals and a snack may easily allow for a breakfast of 375 calories, 50 grams of carbohydrates 12 grams of fat and 20 grams of protein. The doughnut easily fits within this framework although short in several key nutrients. The fat content slows the rate of metabolism so the sugar load doesn't spike a person's blood sugar as much as it might otherwise. If you order a Medium Lite Iced Latte to better balance out your breakfast, you would consume an additional 120 calories, 19 grams carbohydrates, 0 grams fat, and 10 grams of protein. Your totals for your on-the-go breakfast would be about 360 calories, 52 grams carbohydrates, 10 grams fat, and 13 grams protein. This would certainly get your metabolism going and help you resist vending machine urges at the office for a couple hours. Another possible benefit of the doughnut over no breakfast at all is allowing you to feel your healthy eating plan isn't so restrictive. This could mentally help you stay on track.

One of the best ways to avoid having to make a choice between a doughnut breakfast and no breakfast at all is planning. Keep several quick and healthy go to breakfast options on hand. This allows you to grab and go as you run out the door instead of stopping by a drive-thru. What you are grabbing will provide healthier secondary nutrients that a drive thru option may not. If you are someone that has not mastered the skill of pre-planning yet, keep this list of healthier fast food options in your glove box until you have. When you are short on time and are tempted to skip breakfast or wait until you get to work to grab a doughnut, choose something off this list instead. Make your choice based on whether calories, carbohydrates, fat, protein, or sodium content is of most importance to your overall meal planning.

Subway Egg & Cheese Muffin Melt with 100% Juice for a balanced low calorie and low fat choice

Calories – 270

Fat – 6 grams

Sodium – 465 mg

Carbohydrates – 42 grams

Protein – 13 grams

McDonald's Scrambled Eggs with an English Muffin for a balanced higher protein, lower carbohydrate choice

Calories – 330

Fat – 14 grams

Sodium – 460 mg

Carbohydrates – 28 grams

Protein – 20 grams

Starbucks Egg White, Spinach & Feta Wrap for a balanced lower calorie, protein and carbohydrate choice

Calories – 280

Fat – 10 grams

Sodium – 900 mg

Carbohydrates – 33 grams

Protein – 18 grams

Starbucks Perfect Oatmeal with Nut Medley and Dried Fruit Topping for a low sodium choice

Calories – 340

Fat – 11.5 grams

Sodium – 115 mg

Carbohydrates – 51 grams

Protein – 8 grams

Selecting a doughnut for breakfast isn't something we recommend. However, it is a better choice if skipping breakfast is the alternative. Planning and having quick, go-to options on hand for those days when you are running late is ideal. Until you get that skill mastered, keep a list of go-to on-the-go breakfast options readily available. This will allow you to make the most of your fast food breakfast stop when you need something on the go instead of skipping breakfast.

Do you find yourself having to make on-the-go breakfast choices because you are running late? Where do you typically stop? If not, what tips can you offer someone that needs help with breakfast meal planning?


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Comments

  • YOOHAY
    241
    Eating stuff like doughnuts makes me feel sick afterwards, I would not eat the doughnut. I woulde rather skip and eat an early lunch.
    - 12/15/2013   1:51:32 AM
  • HAPPYNANAMO
    240
    I usually enjoy reading the SparkPeople articles, but I have to respectfully, wholeheartedly, and vehemently disagree with the stance this article takes. I haven't had time to read through all the comments, but I do agree with one poster who said you are doing your readers a disservice regarding the blood sugar spike. But more importantly, the author of this article (and many other SparkPeople folks, judging from all the other articles and comments I've read) have somehow amazingly missed the high-profile research that has been chronicled and much-written about in the last year or two regarding the many benefits of intermittent fasting.

    The elevator-speech version of it is that you go 16 hours without eating (every day if you choose, but even a day or two a week is beneficial), which is easily done by skipping breakfast or dinner. This is not a one-size-fits-all panacea - not recommended for pregnant women, diabetics, or folks who are not "fat adapted." You will quickly determine if you are "fat adapted" the first time or two you try to do this. If you are ravenously hungry or weak, then your body has not figured out how to draw on FAT stores rather than carbohydrate stores (which are depleted after 16 hours), so you have to gradually train it to do that (and might not be possible for some folks). But for those who are, it's a GREAT way to lose weight and reap many other benefits. If you work out with heavy weights or do sustained cardio, you can also do this on an EMPTY stomach (yes, you read that right) and time it so that your first meal of the day is your recovery meal.

    Bottom line: It is BETTER (for most folks) to skip the donut! But I also agree with other posters that it's not fair to villainize the donut, either. Of course, if, as some have noted, those few bites of culinary delight are enough to start you on a binge-fest, then it's a no-go. But if you are able to just count it toward your daily caloric intake and be done with it, then it's not the end of the world. For me, though, the sugar rush would just make me crash an hour later, so I'd be much better without the donut. But since I discovered intermittent fasting, it would be a no-brainer and non-issue to just say no.

    ~Karen :) (lost 165 pounds eating sensibly - no extremes of low fat, low carb, low calorie, or excessive dedicated workout sessions - and don't look like someone who lost 165 pounds (think: loose skin) - happy to say I got my sexy back - at the age of 60!) - 12/1/2013   9:23:48 PM
  • 239
    Holy cow! Look at the sodium levels on most of those!! Just because it's low fat, or low calorie, doesn't make it good for you, they add extra sodium to make up for the fat loss and add some flavor back into the food. Something that high in sodium is not heart healthy at all. :( - 9/14/2013   2:16:41 PM
  • BELUOMO
    238
    I'm a sugar addict, so it's easier for me to just stay away from sweets altogether. Telling me a donut is better than no breakfast, is like telling an alcoholic a glass of vodka is better than going thirsty for a few hours.

    I see no reason to eat donuts in the morning as an excuse that one is "on the go". I keep hardboiled eggs, oranges, yogurt, hard cheese, little bags of almonds, etc. handy. It's just as easy to grab those things and run than to grab a donut.

    That being said, for those who are not trying to lose weight or those who only have a minimal amount of weight to lose, if enjoying a donut once in a while is something that really satisfies you and helps to make your health goals more sustainable over the long haul, then by all means have at it! - 8/16/2013   5:27:25 PM
  • CLDEROUEN
    237
    Your article may be doing a huge disservice to your readers. You have your idea backwards that fat slows the sugar spike down. From what I've learned doing nutrition research, sugar causes insulin spikes which leads to storage of whatever it's paired with be it fat or protein. That's why you should avoid pairing sugar and fat together, but can pair unrefined sugar with protein after a workout or pair your healthy fats with protein Also, eating foods high in fat or sugar or salt will lead to cravings of those same unhealthy things later. - 7/7/2013   10:54:26 AM
  • 236
    I say go ahead and eat the donut. If you demonize this food, it becomes more alluring. Sure, it's not good for you, but knowing this, I would try to eat healthier the rest of the day to compensate. - 6/21/2013   8:36:21 AM
  • CARMICH1
    235
    I'll try and make oatmeal night before,prepack it in a small container, in the morning just grab it with a spoon, if this doesn't work natures packaged bannana works great too - 4/19/2013   9:28:05 AM
  • 234
    What's wrong with a bowl of hot oatmeal. Look at the container of calories, but don't add the salt. While eating breakfast or any meal sip some water ( room temperature ) and you will fuller faster. Who says you need 5 small meals. GIVE ME A BREAK. - 3/22/2013   10:32:05 PM
  • 233
    I agree with the others on this subject, if I eat a donut for breakfast I can't stop at just one if more is available to me and then I want carbs and junk food all day. I try to avoid it if at all possible. If I am running late I will put an egg into a small bowl with some salt and pepper then microwave it for 45 seconds, throw it on a piece of bread, tortilla or english muffin and run out the door. This is my goto breakfast in a hurry. Sometimes I'll treat myself by going to Subway for dinner and I'll also purchase an egg white and cheese sandwich on flatbread to have the next morning so I just have to heat it up and breakfast is served. I really try to stay away from any pastries because I like them way too much!! - 3/7/2013   10:53:45 AM
  • GOODWITCH333
    232
    It's just as fast to grab a yogurt, an apple or to make "breakfast cookies" on the weekend, baggie and freeze them and grab one on the way out. Doughnuts should not exist. They are simply fattening, unhealthy, stupid, lazy junk. Sorry doughnut lovers. I call 'em like I see 'em. - 2/20/2013   11:03:42 AM
  • 231
    My problem is that when I start with one doughnut, it opens the floodgates for overeating in general...I have never been good at moderation and so there are just some things that I don't eat - 2/13/2013   3:09:53 PM
  • RS1248
    230
    This article just reminds me to be better about eating breakfast and being prepared to make it, rather than buy a donut. Luckily this doesn't give me a 'pass' to eat junk food... - 12/6/2012   7:57:21 PM
  • 229
    I think I'd rather have nothing at all, if I'm honest! I always, ALWAYS, eat breakfast and I know how important it is (it definitely is the most important meal of the day for me), but there are 2 key reasons why having a doughnut would just not work for me:
    1) it will make me crave junk food all day long! Having junky carbs like that first thing in the morning would make me hungry about an hour later, and not only hungry but also massively craving other junky carbs
    2) if I start the day wrong, I usually go through the whole day wrong. I am a little bit of an all-or-nothing girl (bad, I know, working on it). But once I have some unhealthy, my tendency is to slack off the rest of the day.
    It really doesn't take long to fix up something quickly. I allocate 15-20 minutes each morning for breakfast. I'll have a flaxseed muffin (which takes like 2 minutes to make from scratch, or you could cook up a batch of them and warm them up in the morning) with some peanut butter and a glass of soya milk. Done. And delicious. And will actually fill me up for 3 or 4 hours, unlike a doughnut. - 11/15/2012   6:12:40 AM
  • STAYFIT16
    228
    Sure! Share a doughnut, or get a glazed doughnut for yourself and have a glass of milk with it! Or something else with protein, such as eggs or a fat-free Greek yogurt. The purpose of breakfast is to encourage eating even amounts throughout the day, avoiding both strong hunger and eating based on external stimuli (i.e. when you aren't hungry). For more information about Health visit stayfitnutrition website. - 6/29/2012   3:31:06 AM
  • NANCIEWANDA
    227
    I wish I could eat a doughnut for breakfast when nothing else is available. I don't know if says something about my blood sugar health or not, but if I eat something that's calorie-dense and not nutrient-dense, in an hour or so I'll have a terrible reaction that includes shaking, sweating, a weak feeling, and maybe nausea. I assume it's a low blood sugar reaction. If I eat nothing at all, I will have this reaction but not for 3-5 hours. I have lots more experience with the latter, as I just can't eat right after waking, and then I get involved in things and forget until getting sick reminds me! I know I need to fix this. - 9/7/2010   7:01:47 PM
  • KALPI1
    226
    For those of you who commented on the metabolic rate with or without breakfast, can you provide us with scientific studies/papers that support your claim (either for or against). Personal statements do not have the same validity. If someone has done some research on this please shed some light with references to the articles. Thanks. - 8/23/2010   10:22:52 AM
  • 225
    I was surprised the donut would be the better choice but it made sense when you added 10 grams of protein from the latte. This is great thinking and the kind of transition I’m making in my nutrition choices—think of what you should INCLUDE (protein, fat, carb balance) and not so much what to RESTRICT (calories). Makes perfect sense for keeping it going for a lifetime. Thanks for the refresher.

    Addendum: The discussion generated in comments on this article is fantastic. I like the accountability and strategies expressed by fellow sparkers. The viewpoints indicate that people are acting like grown ups—refusing pat answers when it comes to their health and are questioning, commenting and thinking based on personal experience and self-education. Way to Go!! Agree or disagree, this is a great article and the reason I love SP. - 8/23/2010   9:38:15 AM
  • CMWINCHELL1
    224
    Interesting thought. Typically my breakfast is lunch...but trying to get better about that since I have other issues as well as the body kickstart. I find I don't have the other issues by lunch time when I have a breakfast. My girlfriend and I also make sure I have some type of snack to eat between meals...now... - 8/23/2010   2:12:16 AM
  • ANDPOE
    223
    Next time when you go grocery shopping buy some fiber- one bars,and wash it down with a glass of Skim milk.We all have a rush mornings.Fast food always gives me Heart burn that early in the morning.I think donuts cost about the same amount.Some times if you look at the box of donut theres more than 240 calories in them.So the fiber -one bars would be a better bargan. - 8/21/2010   11:27:03 PM
  • 222
    Usually there are more choices than donut or no breakfast. I don't eat donuts. They are not a healthy food. Most donuts contain trans fats (partially hydrogenated in ingredient listing), saturated fats, no whole grains, little fiber, added sugar, added sodium.

    Partially hydrogenated is unhealthy. Partially hydrogenated ALWAYS = Trans Fats, irregardless of what the nutritional label says. Trans Fats lower good cholesterol and raise bad cholesterol. Federal regulations allow food labels to say they’ve got zero grams of trans fat per serving, provided levels fall below the half-gram threshold per serving. So once again, if your ingredient level says partially hydrogenated, the food has trans fats, even if the nutritional label says zero trans fats.

    The article makes one key point. "The fat content slows the rate of metabolism so the sugar load doesn't spike a person's blood sugar as much as it might otherwise." I find it VERY important in my diet to have healthy fats in each meal, otherwise I get overly hungry or tired later in the day. My primary source of polyunsaturated and monunsaturated fats are olive oil, avocado, and nuts.

    To a lesser extent I need protein in each meal for the same reasons.

    Here are my breakfast choice progressions, depending on how much time I have to prepare breakfast.
    1. Water, vegetable omlette with avocado - prepared with olive oil, whole grain toast using avocado as spread, fresh fruit, skim milk.
    2. omit omlette.
    3. Omit omlette and toast, add cheerios/nut mixture in sandwich bag.

    When I travel I carry cheerios/nut mixture and fruit with me. I can buy the skim milk at a fast food restaurant, convenience store, or gas station.

    So I give the author credit in that I think it is very important to have a mixture of carb, protein, and fat for breakfast. - 8/20/2010   8:58:23 PM
  • 221
    @caramelangel247 -- I, too, used to think that I didn't have time to fix oatmeal.

    HOWEVER, I figured it out. In a bowl, 1/2 C reg. oats +1 C water + handful of raisins + 2 min in the microwave = breakfast in 3 minutes flat, by the time you take it out, add milk, stir. Add brown sugar, honey, molasses as desired; 1 tsp is usu. enough for me.

    Another superquick thing I found and adapted from Allrecipes.com is "Breakfast in a mug": Break 2 eggs in a regular coffee mug, beat up with a little water. Microwave for 1 minute. Stir with fork, add a teaspoon of Hormel real crumbled bacon bits (only 25 cal. for a tablespoon!), and (optional) a Tbsp of shredded cheese (real or reduced fat). Microwave for 1 minute. Stir and enjoy right from the cup. You could even put it in a travel cup and eat it on the road if you're desperate.

    You could leave out the bacon bits if you want, but at only 25 cal for a whole
    tablespoon, it gives me the great flavor of bacon without the fat and calorie hit of eating 2 or 3 strips.

    I'm not an expert, but I'm a teacher with ADD, so I'm often dashing out the front door with only a few minutes to spare for breakfast -- these are just a couple of FAST breakfast ideas I've used to avoid the "muffin trap".

    I've also discovered Jennie-O Turkey Franks. They're cheap, deliecious, and only 70 calories each. Slice up one into the cup of beaten egg, if you want a mock-sausage experience. - 8/20/2010   4:00:03 PM
  • 220
    What an interesting article. I chose the donut over skipping breakfast but if I were to actually eat that donut I would be fighting acid reflux/indigestion within a half hour or so.
    The main point here is that it is vitally important to start your day with breakfast. Keeping healthy choices on hand and taking the time to prepare/consume them to start your day. A healthy breakfast does not have to be a 3 course meal! There are lots of choices and most of them are really quick to prepare.
    Personally, I fix Cream of Rice w/apple, allspice and vanilla soy milk during the week (takes less than 5 minutes to prepare) and usually make some form of egg dish (using egg substitute) on the weekends.
    I love breakfast! *S* - 8/20/2010   10:43:05 AM
  • 219
    Hmm, it wouldn't do me much good to keep that list in my glovebox - I walk to work! :^)

    I read an article a while ago saying that research is divided on whether or not breakfast is really needed by all people, in order to achieve healthy eating and weight loss goals. I know I'm not very hungry in the morning and a lack of breakfast doesn't seem to affect my overall eating for the day. And in fact, I seem to get hungry for lunch earlier on days I've had breakfast!

    But the point about breakfast revving up your metabolism has me intrigued. I'll have to investigate this more.

    (for what it's worth, my favorite breakfast is fresh fruit with some dry cereal and/or a spoonful or two of yogurt (plain low-fat or maybe a vanilla).) - 8/19/2010   8:51:37 PM
  • MIAISAWESOME
    218
    I love how Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts and now Subway all have egg white sandwiches, it makes eating out for breakfast not such a bad thing! - 8/19/2010   2:19:41 PM
  • FRIMOUSSE2
    217
    I sometimes keep hard boil egg with the shell on in the fridge, a mix of cereal in ziploc bag so when I'm on the go they are easy to munch on. I also make low fat french toast, freeze them and put them in the toaster before the shower and again when I get out. It takes 2 minutes to eat and it's good with apple sauce. Usually the drive thru takes more time then putting something together to bring along. - 8/19/2010   12:37:25 PM
  • PSYCHOJULES
    216
    forget the donut--gimme a sausage jalapeno cheese kolache or two! (well, that used to be the case, trying to go full vegetarian again)--but yeah, i can admit that i've done the donuts thing instead of nothing--but i usually don't have just one, which is a worry if you're trying to lose weight.

    one thing that's helped is keeping lots of little snacks, like 100 cals here and there in pretzels, a banana, etc, in my cart for school in case i get peckish here and there and decide not to do the whole donut thing. sadly, that's not quite possible every day, and they keep donuts very cheap, which is bad for broke people like me...but a once in a while breakfast, i foresee no real issues. i don't do the mcD's or other places breakfast thing anymore (used to all the time) because i can't stand the taste of the food anymore and it'd make me wanna get sick. a donut, two at the most, though, didn't do that to me, and when i had no coffee, it was a good way to boost me up quick, at least til i could get something a little more substantial in me in the next hour or so. - 8/19/2010   8:50:55 AM
  • 215
    @ honeydripper- Now I'm singing "Dad is great! He gave me chocolate cake!"

    A donut and skim milk from the gas station or a bowl of cereal or nothing at all are the only breakfast choices I've managed in the morning before work. I've mastered the 7 minute shower but a 15 minute breakfast is the beyond me. Oatmeal and turkey bacon take more time to cook and eat than I have in the morning.

    I'm planning to either carry a packet of oatmeal in my purse (and eat at work) or start having a special k or slimfast shake in the morning. But since Slimfast had that recall and I don't have water bottles I can't make powdered slimfast in the morning and still end up with the donut :-P - 8/18/2010   9:50:30 PM
  • 214
    This reminds me of a Bill Cosby tale about giving his kids chocolate cake for breakfast because the ingredients are grain, milk and eggs. - 8/18/2010   8:33:23 PM
  • NURSE2HEALTH
    213
    I put together a smoothie every morning with 1-2 bananas, 2T natural PB and 1 cup usually of soy, coconut or skim milk. 6 of 7 days a week I blend it every morning. It's easy, and taste delicious for about 350-400 calories. But a doughnut is yummy every now and again. But rarely! - 8/18/2010   8:11:05 PM
  • 212
    It may be better, but I would rather have nothing than eat the doughnut. I keep protein shakes in the fridge. I just prefer to grab one of those. - 8/18/2010   7:46:33 PM
  • PAMELALANDIS
    211
    I generally don't eat "breakfast" until I am at work for 3 or 4 hours already. This is a good reminder to have something ready to walk out the door with; something to eat on the way to work or shortly after I get there. I am going to give it a shot. - 8/18/2010   6:38:34 PM
  • LIVINGONMYTERMS
    210
    To answer this question it is better to eat a doughnut than to skip breakfast. It may not be a great choice but better than nothing. Everything in moderation. - 8/18/2010   5:54:02 PM
  • 209
    I agree that, "Selecting a doughnut for breakfast isn't something we recommend. However, it is a better choice if skipping breakfast is the alternative."


    - 8/18/2010   1:48:58 PM
  • 208
    i stop every morning for coffee at starbucks....im a huge fan of the spinich/ feta wrap or the turkey bacon egg white sandwich..i might get them once or twice a week..but for the most part my work has a fridge and i have bagels in freezer and peanut butter in the fridge and i always have banannas and yogurt at home so once i get to work at 0530 i'll eat....but i have been know to get a dounut at the place next door.....but i always feel crappy after i have it....i guess its all in moderation. I'm sure if i skipped breakfast i never make it to lunch w/o raiding the vending machines here. - 8/18/2010   11:37:57 AM
  • 207
    Hi! Everything in moderation... I gained weight when I found a fast food sausage and egg breakfast muffin for $1.00... I would buy 2 of them as I was coming in to work... I am starting to think now before I buy fast food! When I am at the grocery store, I am buying more fruits and veggies... I take 2 pieces of fruit for breakfast now and eat less meats, sweets and fatty food - 8/18/2010   10:36:04 AM
  • ARTYONE01
    206
    If I havn't had time to eat breakfast. I will stop by the drive through at McDonalds and get an Egg McMuffin and coffee or orange juice. The Egg McMuffin is only about 300 calaries. It has plently of protein to help keep me full till lunch. The canadan bacon is more or less a lean ham. The egg is only 80 caleries, the English Muffin has no fat in it. And if you want you can always tell them to make it with out the cheese. But the cheese does add protein as well. I skip the hashbrown thing, it has no value. I think the Egg McMuffin with orange juice or coffee is a great healthy and tastey option. - 8/18/2010   10:34:27 AM
  • GWFATBOY55
    205
    I think a lot of you are reading too much into this. It`s a choice, eat the donut, or don`t. Wake your metabolism, or not. It`s just a choice, yes or no. The total fat, sugars, carbs etc are well within a daily balanced diet. Perfect NO, but the author said as much.

    Certainly DO NOT blame the donut as being a causative factor in your making bad food choices for the rest of the day, and if you truly believe the evil, sinister donut has powers that make you a bad eater, well get your jaws wired shut until lunch.

    POLARPUP said "this only reinforces the need to plan ahead!!"

    Possibly the best thought on this thread - 8/18/2010   7:55:42 AM
  • 204
    There are lots of options to avoid having to make this choice, or any fast food choice in the morning. I'm a stay at home mom now, but when I had to go to work early in the morning one of the things I always kept at work was instant oatmeal. It is quick, and most employers either have hot water ready, or a way to easily prepare it. (By the same token, I always kept some instant soups, like split pea, and vegetarian chili, that just needed water. i.e. Fantastic Foods) You can always make muffins, individually wrap and freeze them, and then just pull one out on your way out the door. They don't take long to thaw. I often make up a bunch of healthy breakfast burritos for my hubby. I wrap them all and throw them in the freezer, he has a microwaveable breakfast when he needs it. It all just takes some planning. Don't forget keeping a bowl of fresh fruit, nothing beats a banana for a great breakfast on the run. Spread some peanut butter on it, and add a cup of coffee or tea, and you are ready to roll. - 8/18/2010   7:19:20 AM
  • FOODJUNKIE1970
    203
    I need to find some quick healthy, but low calorie options for breakfast. I seem to run out the door without eating because I have to be at work early in the morning. This is a definite goal worth pursuing. - 8/18/2010   1:27:33 AM
  • LEXIEA88
    202
    I HONESTY THINK THAT IT SHOULD BE.............
    The doughtnut because breakfeast is totally the most important meal of the day obviously. So with that being even though the doughnut is not your best choice.............( Never say you had a bad day, Say you'll do better tomarrow ) it will be better than nothing. Well why you ask??? Because breakfeast gets your brain moving. And make it strong for the day so you can go to work and not have that 11 or 12 o'clock craving. And I know some of you who disagree with me or maybe are just questing it well the 11 o'clock craving will be less calories. Well it technecly would depend but you would actually want to have breakfeast since it would get you brain moving for work (or school) like I said before. If you read this please tell me what you think and also thanks so much for reading!!!!! - 8/17/2010   11:13:53 PM
  • 201
    I'D RATHER DO WITHOUT

    If my only choice were road kill - I'd fast.

    Same difference. - 8/17/2010   10:28:30 PM
  • 200
    I have to respectfully disagree with this logic. In general, I think a big part of the problem people have with changing their lifestyles into healthier versions is the rationalizing of, "once in a while," treats. These justifications too easily become once a month, then once a day, then regression back to old behavior patterns. I agree that you have to start slow, and make changes gradually, but I feel that some people never get anywhere because the baby steps become too insignificant to make a measurable impact after awhile.

    Also, the argument that certain behaviors will, "slow one's metabolism," is dreadfully misunderstood and overused. The percentage by which someone's metabolism slows following a short period of fasting is truly inconsequential. I think it boils down to the saying, "He who fails to plan, plans to fail." And, if it's truly a once per year, caught without breakfast scenario, regardless of whether you choose the doughnut or fasting, it's a drop in the bucket of the grand scheme of things. - 8/17/2010   10:16:22 PM
  • PANDA908
    199
    I have to disagree with the author on this one. First of all, your metabolism will not slow down significantly if you do not have breakfast. It takes days of extreme caloric restriction to see any decreases in metabolism. Also, I don't think that having a donut will make most people crave a healthy lunch. Having that much sugar early in the morning will make most people crave more sugar throughout the day. (I definitely have experienced this!) I think the better choice would be to skip breakfast and try to have an early lunch. Maybe a big salad with lots of fibrous veggies a protein source. You should not feel deprived and hungry all day if you eat a filling, healthy lunch after having to skip breakfast.

    That being said, having a donut for breakfast is not the end of the world. If you really enjoy donuts, then it's ok to splurge every once in a while. But like SUNGIRL23 said, don't fool yourself into thinking its a healthy choice. - 8/17/2010   9:52:05 PM
  • 198
    I guess I agree with both Sungirl23 and Voltzen.

    I have been pretty successful using the "everything in moderation" approach to making food choices. I've spent more than a year making better choices and I've radically changed what I eat; but it has been a discovery process.

    A year ago I would have considered it a failure to succumb to a donut for breakfast. Now, I know how to adjust my day if I make that choice.

    Good topic! - 8/17/2010   9:26:00 PM
  • 197
    When I was on vacation I had the choice of a piece of toast or a muffin.
    I took half a muffin. am not used to that much sugar in the morning hated it.
    Maybe I will make a better choice next time. - 8/17/2010   9:05:51 PM
  • 196
    Though it would be very unusual for me not to have a good breakfast option when starting my morning at my own home, I have run into the "only crap for breakfast" scenario when on the road. I usually try to have options with me, but I have been caught occasionally.

    It's good to know the doughnut won't be terrible if I'm at a multi-day meeting and whoever's catering the event has planned badly for breakfast. - 8/17/2010   8:31:36 PM
  • 195
    I don't agree or disagree with this article, but I do think it is a bit of a cop out. I get up to go to work at 4:30am and leave by 5am. I NEVER stop and get a donut or some other fast food breakfast. I plan the night before so I can take fruit, yogart, oatmeal and/or cereal with me to work for breakfast. I think that planning ahead is the key in all of this. Otherwise it is easy to make unhealthy choices or say, "well a donut is better than nothing". - 8/17/2010   8:12:48 PM
  • PATTI553
    194
    It takes a while to getting used to eating a big breakfast and getting up early enough to do it. It is well worth the effort, I feel much more energetic than I did without a good breakfast............. - 8/17/2010   7:23:11 PM
  • 193
    When I miss breakfast, my day does not go very well. Eating breakfast makes the day run smoother. I can't explain it, but I am more alert and attentive. - 8/17/2010   7:12:52 PM
  • VOLTZEN
    192
    Great article. Personally, I believe in that old adage "everything in moderation," and if I were to tell myself that I could NEVER touch a doughnut again, EVER, it would eventually lead me to toss my diet to the curb. Of course for some people, that might trigger a binge, in which case there are plenty of healthy "on-the-go" foods, just grab a piece of fruit.

    If you want to consume less calories and fat but still have that doughnut for breakfast, why not cut it in half? This is what I do with sugary and/or fatty treats, I will break it in half or thirds and either make two or three meals/snacks of it, or share it with my boyfriend or somebody else. That way I get to satisfy the craving (if I try to ignore cravings or substitute with other foods, it can quickly devolve into a binge), but still save on the calories. Again though, this does take some willpower, but it works for me.

    It's all about the total numbers in the end, as long as you keep your intake within limits and make sure more of those calories come from healthy, nutritious sources, you'll be fine. All or nothing thinking is very unhealthy. - 8/17/2010   6:42:57 PM

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