On International Women’s Day, Think about the Woman You've Become--and What Got You Here

2SHARES

By: , SparkPeople Blogger
3/8/2009 7:41 AM   :  67 comments

See More: friendship,
By Debba Haupert, creator of GIRLFRIENDOLOGY.com – the online community for women focused on female friendship



When we look at our mothers, aunts and sisters, we can get a pretty good read on our genetics. If they’re healthy, fit and strong, we’ve got less of a battle than if our ancestors have struggled with excessive weight, cancer and other health issues. Some hereditary genetics we can counteract with diet, exercise and healthy living habits, and some though we just can't do anything about-- like our height, body type and even our tendency for some unhealthy habits. Our ancestors and genetics play a role in our lives on a daily basis.

In addition to our hereditary genetics, our lives also are influenced by the sisterhood of women whose actions, accomplishments and inspiration affect our lives. For example:
  • Venus and Serena who inspire us to physically be our bests.
  • Oprah and Gayle who serve as examples of strong and lasting friendship.
  • Jennifer Aniston who redefines what a 40-year-old female looks like.
  • Billie Jean King who believed in herself and the power of women.
  • And, all the women who have started successful businesses, achieved high levels of leadership and who have made a difference for so many others.


Just take a look at your life and the environment in which you grew up.

Consider the Girl Scout leaders and teachers who challenged you to grow, the neighbor whose kindness taught you how to be more thoughtful, and your girlfriends who accepted you exactly as you were. We have an unrelated, but equally important, lineage and legacy of women without whom our lives would lack fulfillment and potential. And, without whom we would never be able to participate in athletics, have opportunities to own our own businesses, be elected or even vote.

One of those women was Clara Zetkin. She lived her life with passion – most of it centered around helping other women. She fought for women’s equality and the right to vote, back in a time (starting in the late 1800s) when it was scandalous and regarded unimportant.

Through the hardships of life and being exiled to foreign countries, she continued to fight. Clara initiated a day, International Women’s Day, which she hoped to be celebrated in every country. The first was March 8, 1911. Now, almost 100 years later, that day is recognized as a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future. In 2009 there are over 700 events for International Women's Day in 49 countries.

What does this mean to us – women living in 2009 and just looking for ways to stay healthy and happy? It means that we owe the women who have gone before us thanks for their efforts and dedication to secure our freedom to vote, to have jobs and expect equal pay, to marry and live the way we want, and to have the express rights of freedom and fairness.
We have "come a long way, baby." International Women’s Day is a celebration of Clara and how far we’ve come since her dedicated efforts.

Look at your own female ancestors – who was the first to reach new levels of education and professional achievement? It wasn’t that long ago that our great-grandmothers weren’t allowed to vote or witness in a court of law. Or that our mothers weren’t allowed to wear pants or even make-up. And remember to look to our "sisters" in other countries whose voices still are silenced by laws and oppression. We have a long way to go, but at least we have Carla and others as our legacy of faith in females.

How can we all celebrate International Women’s Day today and Women’s History Month in March? First, we can simply stop and take a moment to be thankful for the women who have cleared a path for our success and advancement. Be they Billie Jean or Clara Zetkin or our mothers and aunts, we should pause to reflect and, if possible, show gratitude. We can celebrate our rights and the distance we’ve come in the past century. And, we can establish a tradition of taking care of each other.

We can do this through simple friendships or mentoring, by demonstrating to our daughters how we as women support each other and through coming into our true selves and being the best we can be. Train for a marathon, start a new business, set your sites on your dreams and go for them!

Be thankful for your heritage of feminine strength and determination. Step into your power from the legacy of women who have gone before us and fought for our rights. Stand a little taller today with the pride of all we’ve done. We’ve come a long way, baby--and that’s a great heritage to have!

Girlfriendology is the online community for women based on inspiration, appreciation and celebration of female friendship.

Founded by Debba Haupert in 2006, Girlfriendology inspires women to make new female acquaintances, spend time with their girlfriends, and appreciate those friendships that are vital to women’s health and happiness. Girlfriendology.com features inspiring women in weekly podcasts and live BlogTalkRadio show, contests to share girlfriend stories and provides videos, shopping, reviews, blogs and more.



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Comments

  • BLUEMYBABY
    67
    I really appreciated this article. Actually, it was an article that I needed to read today for many personal reasons.

    I did not know there was a day such as this. Unfortunate that in our country it is not more publicized such as in some of the others that other readers have written about. I am going to check this website out and share with others.

    Thank you for this uplifting information. - 3/10/2009   10:54:47 AM
  • 66
    Bravo ChowChowgirl and others who have articulated the continued struggle of many women across the globe. - 3/10/2009   9:51:57 AM
  • DAWNB14
    65
    How sad the greatest woman of all time, Our Blessed Mother, isn't even worthy of a mention. The others pale in comparison to Her. - 3/10/2009   9:03:00 AM
  • 64
    Very heartening article! It made me feel good. I understand the view that celebrating one group (us girls) is separatist, but as long as girls are having acid thrown in their faces for trying to go to school, as long as women are forbidden to drive (look how some guys drive, really!!!), and as long as female genital mutilation continues across the globe, then there is a lot of work to do, a lot of awareness to spread. - 3/10/2009   2:23:37 AM
  • 63
    I'm a bit surprised it seems from many of the comments that this day is not widely acknowledged in the US. In Norway where I am from we have celebrated the Women's Day for years, remembering the fight for womens right to vote, equal pay for equal work and so on. And we have still a long way to go in many parts of the world, and even in Scandinavia. - 3/9/2009   6:49:54 PM
  • JANWOMAN2
    62
    Great article to reflect on those who I love and gone on a journey with over time. I have thoughts of joy and thoughts of hurt and betrayal......brings thoughts of forgiveness with caution......those women who have loyal friends and betray them need time to heal and get their head straight .....

    All my love to the women who love without agenda motive or control....

    I can think of 8 women in my life who were an inspiration and I bless God for them.

    I Celebrate them with all my heart. - 3/9/2009   6:04:24 PM
  • 61
    Womens day is a popular holiday in Italy- on Women's day the women get together and go out for drinks, get special treatment in restaurants and clubs and normally go out shopping or do something with friends all day. And the men take the chance to have fun together too!
    Men also give flowers to women, collegues, friends, family, even strangers- it is in March too, so the only flowers blooming are Mimosas- little yellow fuzzy flowers. It's just a little way that the men can say 'thanks' and show their appreciation for women all over. - 3/9/2009   4:21:07 PM
  • 60
    In Russia, this day really makes you feel special if you are female. All women - no matter how young or old, mothers or not, are celebrated. It's a day of a great mood - you get congratulations and flowers from everybody all day. It's like a birthday that's shared by all women. Also, it's an official holiday so most businesses are closed... I can only hope that one day US takes it on here, too!

    I don't think it shows off the inequality at all. Instead, it's a day to appreciate one gender. We have the same kind of a day for the guys - on February 23rd. - 3/9/2009   4:15:59 PM
  • 59
    Thinking about my grandmothers: GG was born in 1878; after graduating from high school, she went into teaching - at that same school. Soon, she married and moved with her husband to Pueblo, CO, in hopes that the altitude would help his tuberculosis; it didn't, so the young widow returned home and decided to go to college. In 1904, she graduated from the University of Illinois! She married my grandfather in 1910, and their only child (my father) was born in 1915. Although not a nurse, she nursed many during the Influenza epidemic, and she nursed my grandfather through his losing bout with throat cancer. Again a widow, she eventually took in and cared for a brother and a sister, and she spent many years as the town librarian. A lifelong student, she would get up early to watch the 'Sunrise Seminar' on tv. She used to marvel at the range of knowledge she had seen in her lifetime, from the textbooks that said the atom was the smallest thing in existence and could not be broken down to seeing men walk on the moon! She died at age 93 following surgery for a broken hip.

    GM was born in 1896 and married shortly after graduating from high school. Her husband was an underground coal miner; they had 4 children. He died relatively young of complications from black lung disease. All of her life, she did laundry for others; eventually she got a part-time job as school cook, and she worked as a babysitter as well. She worked hard, but she took immense pride in her work. She died at age 89.

    Two strong women, from the same small central Illinois town, as different as could be, but linked by their children and grandchildren. I am who and what I am in large part because of them. - 3/9/2009   4:05:24 PM
  • 58
    After reading this article, there was a wonderful sense of gratitude and a time of reflection. I am so grateful for the many women that have imparted wisdom, love, and nurtured me into the woman I am today. As a nation, it is time to begin celebrating the different facets that evolve and embodies one of the most beautiful creation God every made, the woman. Thanks for being this article to spark. - 3/9/2009   3:02:18 PM
  • 57
    Wonderful article. I often think of the women who paved the way for me and those I can help pave the way for. - 3/9/2009   1:49:39 PM
  • ROSEMARDORF
    56
    HI, I really enjoyed this article. I am thankful to the women who fought for our rights to vote!!
    I admire Billy Jean King,and all the people who fought for civil rights!!!! I also enjoy the
    friendship with other women!I have sisters and a sister-inlaw, who is like a sister to me, and always will be!! I lost a good friend in 2008, and I miss her!!! I also have a very dear friend,
    who adopted me as a sister, because she never had a sister and I am so thankful for her!!1
    My mom is deceased and so are my aunts, except for one. Yes I am a Mother and grandma,
    but I do not think less of women who aren't.. Any woman has alot to give and learn from!!
    ROSEMARDORF 12:25 March8 2009 - 3/9/2009   1:14:41 PM
  • 55
    Thanks for the article...I enjoyed reading it, and it DID make me more appreciative of the sacrifice that all the women in my family (whether living or passed) have made for a better life for themselves, and ultimately for me. I also enjoyed reading the comments on this blog! Thanks! - 3/9/2009   11:55:24 AM
  • 54
    Thanks for a great article! I pay hommage to my maternal grandmother who insisted her daughters go to school in a time and place (Ghana, West Africa early 1900s) when and where only boys counted. She worked hard baking, sewing, trading to pay for her daughters' education. I pay tribute to my aunt, Justice Annie Ruth Jiagge, who as a result became the first woman judge of the Supreme Court of Ghana and worked for years with the World Council of Churches and Unicef and other UN organisations to enhance the status of women world-wide. I pay tribute to my mother, who worked as an educationist and enabled thousands of young women to go on to higher education in Ghana and Britain. Thanks to all the women who went before us and struggled and dared to make it possible for us women of today and our daughters, women of tomorrow, to be free, educated, and able to realize our talents and ambitions. The struggle is not over. Let's keep the fire burning. My aunt often said "when you educate one woman you educate a nation". Our nations all over the world need us - no offense to the gents! lol - 3/9/2009   11:51:26 AM
  • BLUEBERRYHILL
    53
    Oh wow! This is beautiful because as I was sitting in church with my oldest daughter yesterday, I heard my Grandmother pray. The issue is that all of my grandmothers (Grandma Cannon, Grandma Memphis (yes, she lived in Memphis, TN) and Grandma Warlene (who is a step-Grandmother but never treated me and my sister like steps) all passed away. Each one of them had a different personality that shaped me into who I am today. My Grandma Cannon was the Grandma that made homemade cakes and biscuits and would pray for you if you were sick. She would get up every morning at 530a and make breakfast. Lunch was fried pork chops, cabbage, corn,etc...and dinner was roast, potatoes and peas and of course a homemade cobbler. This was during the week. Every Sunday we had Sunday dinner at Grandma's and this included her and Grandpa 2 daughters and 6 sons and all of their children. Every thing I know about cooking and being a submissive wife is from her. She was a quiet woman except when it was time to pray. :) Then I had Grandma Memphis that I saw twice a year. She was a well known seamstress and would make dresses for me and my sister. She was the fashionista...a Southern Belle. She was the fiesty Grandma that taught me how a lady should always look her best and have a life outside of the home. :) :) She divorced my Grandfather when my dad was only three and was a single Mom when that wasn't in (50s) but she did her BEST with whatever she had. Went back and got a degree so she would always have another income besides what she brought in from her sewing. Then I had my Grandma Warlene. The working woman...I called her Wonder Woman. She worked a third shift job so we would be at Grandma and Grandpa Nashes on Fridays having a fish fry and around 11p she would leave. This was normal until at the age of 10 I finally asked my Mom why did Grandma have to leave and she told me..."she's going to work" and all that time I thought she didn't work 'cuz she was always home during the day. :) My little mind couldn't comprehend how my Grandmother could work at night and still be awake during the day. Every Sunday she wore a hat to church...had the BEST looking hats...and to this day, I'm a hat woman. :) :) :) I get my work ethics from my Grandma Warlene.

    So I really miss them, especially today! These were three wonderful women of God that I loved DEARLY!!!! I just hope I'm making them proud raising my three girls to be just like them! - 3/9/2009   11:25:10 AM
  • 52
    I've never heard of International Women's Day. Its not celebrated in the US or I'm sure I would have noticed by now.

    The opression of women in many areas of our wourld is a planetary disgrace! I wonder if it is celebrated in the Middle East? If so how? Do they tell the women how lucky they are to be "protected" by being denied practically every basic human right that exists, shrouded in sheets, forbidden to drive, or be educated, their clitoris aputated, their education denied,and then married off at 9, which is the legal age of marriage in Iran!

    Our world has a long way to go when it comes to the liberation of women, and until that happens the world cannot prosper as it should. - 3/9/2009   11:22:18 AM
  • ACHOI714
    51
    Thank you writing this! I think it's important to celebrate all that women can do, especially for young ladies and girls today. So many times they see the incorrect perspective of a woman. However, the most important thing to remember is how a female views herself and not compared to others. When we aren't confident about ourselves, we then start to judge ourselves (quite harshly, too) as well as judge others. I hope all females will find something within themselves to be proud of each and every day! Even something simple like breathing and living your life for today. :D - 3/9/2009   10:23:22 AM
  • 50
    I only hope that I can live up to the women in my life who influenced me, first my grandmother- Muzzy, she instilled in me a love of family, learning and cooking. She was a working mother who raised 3 children mostly on her own and went back and got her degree in hydrolic engineering and meterology when women did not do that type of work and worked until she had to retire. Even with her career, family was always one of the most important factors in her life. My Nana also ended up after the death of 2 husbands raising children. She instilled in me that raising children is a very important job and to always have faith in God. She was caring for my cousins 2 children the day that she passed, my cousin came to pick them up and while getting one out of the playpen my nana said she thought she pulled something in her chest. She was gone within a couple of hours in the ER. My mother raised the 5 of us. My mother was a stay at home mom in my early years and then went to work. We were always in church on Sunday, Sunday night and usually Wednesday. That faith in God that was with her mother and passed on to me. She will be 71 and after a knee replacement a few years ago still is working. My wonderful mother in law just passed Saturday, she taught me so much on love and added to my cooking skills. She will be so sorely missed and was loved by so many. Her faith in God has never been shaken even with some of the tribulations thrown at her.
    I thank God for the women who have given me so much and I hope that I have made a difference in my children and grandchildren. - 3/9/2009   10:20:52 AM
  • 49
    My grandmother was definitely my inspiration of the type of woman I wanted to be.
    Sadly International Women's Day is not celebrated very much here in the U.S. It should be. - 3/9/2009   9:54:01 AM
  • 48
    My mother and sister are not with us anymore. For years, I have bumped into other women who are so involved in their families that they do not know anyone else is out there. They cannot even spare a moment of their time to return a call to someone who is not "family". I had to call until they talked to me. Needless to say, relationships like that do not last. I worked a full time job for 24 years, raised 2 kids, went to church and did all the church and school functions, but I always knew that you need to talk to women outside your immediate family. You need "ME" time. There is nothing wrong with doing a few things that are not orientated around your family. Sooner or later the kids are gone and the nest is empty. It is so hard to find and hang onto girlfriends! Whatever stage of your life that you are in now, develop those relationships with girlfriends. It is hard work but it is a life line of help! Girlfriends and the time they take are an asset to your life! - 3/9/2009   9:24:44 AM
  • 47
    I don't understand why this is the first I have heard of this celebration.
    I have a detailed list of monthly observances that I use for a bulletin board.
    This is definitely getting added to my official list. Thank You.

    My not knowing this, makes me feel that his observance might be "scandalous and regarded unimportant." It will be interesting to see if the media recognize it.

    I often think of how different my life is from both of my grandmothers.
    I had to laugh, as I was required to wear skirts/dresses until I graduated from college. [we only could wear slacks/not jeans/ to football games]
    I guess I am a grandma. - 3/9/2009   9:03:47 AM
  • 46
    I always thought my grandmother was ahead of her time for a woman. She was born in 1901 and didn't marry until she was 24. She went on to have 12 children, 7 of them girls. She told each and every one of them to graduate high school, move to a bigger city and have a career before getting married and having children. So all 7 girls went on to get jobs instead of getting married right away. My mom joined the Navy, one of her sisters joined the Marines, one became an Executive Secretary for a major oil company, another became Vice President of an advertising company that had products known world wide. Another sister became a German Teacher, another an RN, and another one worked most of her life at a department store.

    They had grown up dirt poor in the country with no running water and called white trash by their class mates because of how poor they were. They all became something because of my grandmother whom I loved and miss, as she past away shortly before her 89th birthday. - 3/9/2009   8:56:47 AM
  • 45
    Glad to see this holiday noted here - I was lucky enough to grow up in a family where we celebrated it, since my mother is Russian, and I always wondered that other families didn't honor the women in the clan that day! - 3/9/2009   8:09:29 AM
  • 44
    I tend to have mixed feelings about things like this. On the one hand, recognizing and celebrating the accomplishments of women is a very positive factor. On the other hand, it seems a bit separatist to me. I'm all for embracing one's heritage, gender, ethnicity, and spirituality, but manufactured designations like this also tend to separate rather than integrate those of a given gender, ethnicity or spirituality. True equality will be when human kind no longer feels the need to emphasize gender, race, and religious differences and we stop profiling people programs like affirmitive action, women and minority own business breaks, and equal opportunity. There was a time and place for all of those things, but I look forward to the day when there will no longer be a need for them. THAT is true equality., - 3/9/2009   7:56:22 AM
  • 43
    This really was an inspiring article for me. Sadly, even though I was aware there was such a day, I had no idea what the date was. Shame on me!

    In my lifetime, I have seen such a drastic change in the options and opportunities available to women. As another person posted, however, we do still have a long way to go - and not just in terms of equal pay.

    Women in the U.S enjoy so very many freedoms that are not afforded to our sisters in many other societies. Even here, the rate of domesic violence against women is alarmingly high, in my opinion. We and future generations of women have a lot of work still before us before women worldwide are truly equal to their male counterparts. It's up to us to teach our sons and daughters, our grandsons and granddaughters mutual respect and self-respect.

    To me, the ideal is for women to be strong, forward thinking, and powerful without sacrificing their sensitivity, their compassion, and all those wonderful traits that make a woman a lady.

    We've come a long way, baby. - 3/9/2009   7:07:02 AM
  • 42
    Thanks for the article Stepf! When I think of the women who influence me I think on Eleanor Roosevelt, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Hilary Clinton and Michelle Obama who redefined the role of First Lady. I think of my favorite poets, Maya and Nikki who send me on an "Ego Trip" and make me believe I am "Phenomenal Woman". The women in my family who taught me about life in general, those who set examples of what I want to be like and don't want to be like, about cooking, style, sex appeal, glamour, common sense and style. There was Miss Blanche and Miss Geneva who are gone now but gave new meaning to the expression "nobody's fool" because of their common sense and strength. Miss Geneva was also an influence on my love of big, fancy church hats. I celebrate my mother, grandmother and aunts who taught me strength in tough times, a sense of humor, to be non-judgemental, to have a love and respect of God and how to work a stove. I think of Mrs. Marshall who taught me to love reading everything from Hemingway to Revelations, Miss Cleveland who taught me to love all music from Bach to Beyoncé and I think of the women who have laid down their lives for God, family and country. From those women I draw my strength, courage, intelligence and knowledge. During international women's month I salute and honor them! - 3/9/2009   6:57:51 AM
  • MRS.BUTLER1
    41
    I have had the same best friend for over 30 years and I don't know what I would do without her!! - 3/9/2009   6:45:23 AM
  • 40
    YEAH!!!!!!!!!! GO WOMEN...........GO!!!!!!! Great article - 3/9/2009   6:19:16 AM
  • CRICKETRO
    39
    SEESAW, AMEN! I'm there wt ya! I'm 28 and didn't have any children yet. I graduated my 2nd masters and I have a successful career. My marriage is great as well. Does it mean I'm not a good role mother b/c I refused to have kids b4 we are financially stable (not to mention wt this crisis looming around, who wants kids!?) ? - 3/9/2009   6:06:43 AM
  • CRICKETRO
    38
    ANY woman can be a role mother, whether she had children or not. This year I was sick of tired of hearing "happy mother's day' instead of "happy woman's day" on March 8. Really? If a woman is not a mother, she's less of a woman!? how abt a woman who builds her career b4 being a mother so that she can offer everything to her future kids?!
    Unfortunately, over the years, March 8 - at least in Romania- became Mother's Day and not Woman's Day....it's sad, b/c March 8 was all about liberties and rights for WOMEN not for mothers only. - 3/9/2009   6:04:39 AM
  • 37
    Oh, and JIBBIE49 who also made the comment about not having children means you cannot be a good role model for women. A disservice is being made to the many childless women and it also goes against what the day represents--being a woman and the many accomplishments that can be made. I was the first person in the family to attend and graduate college. I am a teacher and as such I AM a good role model for women. No one can tell me any differently just because I am childless.

    I will get off of my soapbox now. - 3/9/2009   5:58:45 AM
  • 36
    I never heard of this day either until I clicked on the little logo on my Yahoo page yesterday and then this morning received the Daily Spark with the link to this article.

    I do have a problem with what ELAINES330 said in her post (#32) about Jennifer Aniston being an insult to women because she has NOT had any children. I think ELAINES330 just insulted the many women, myself included, who want children but are unable to have them. Just because you do not have any children does not mean you cannot be a good role model for other women. - 3/9/2009   5:51:27 AM
  • DORIS_ANNE
    35
    Thank you for sharing this with us. I have heard of International Womens Day, our church had a day of prayer, but I didn't know the origins. - 3/9/2009   3:16:45 AM
  • 34
    As I was reading this, I felt a sense of loss... I WISH I had a mom, aunts or sisters to look to, but there are no female relatives left in my family (never had sisters, all else have passed away). Then it hit me: I'M the mother, and the grandmother (no nieces, only nephews). I'm one of the women those young women and girls in my family will look to for inspiration and as an example. YIKES! But as I reread the blog, I realized, I think I can be that woman.

    I wasn't allowed to wear pants in school, and helped fight the school board to change the rule. I was expected to marry immediately, and not pursue a career; I defied my father, left an abusive husband and became a single mother - with a career. When my parents traveled, I wasn't allowed to work in the barn, but had to cook and clean for my brothers; my son knew how to cook and maintain a household, while my daughter worked stage construction and loves her tools.

    It's not a lot, but it's a start! I'm looking forward to being the best woman (and person) I can be, and make the family twigs below me very proud. ~ - 3/9/2009   2:43:44 AM
  • XSHEWOLFX
    33
    What a fantastic article, and to think that this is the first time i have heard of Womans Day. We all learn each and every day. - 3/9/2009   1:42:48 AM
  • 32
    I think of my grandmother and great aunts. They were still traveling to China, Russia, Australia, etc in their 80's. My grandmother was still bowling in her early 90's. They all lived to be in their 90's. My grandmother came so close to making it to 100. They taught me to always enjoy life. Age really is a state of mind. I am so lucky to have had such wonderful examples of how to live life fully from these wonderful women!

    - 3/9/2009   1:30:07 AM
  • SHERI1969
    31
    Nice to know there is an Internation day just for us gals! God bless us for without us, there would be no people! Blessings to all my sisters around the world. - 3/9/2009   12:56:04 AM
  • 30
    Great Blog Thanks - I recently finished reading "The Kabul Beauty School" and "1000 Splendid Suns". We have so many opportunities in the US! Including helping our Sisters and Brothers in other countries. Oppressions, suppression, misogyny and sexism are still very much alive - even here. We must stay educated and aware of how women are treated through out the world, so that equality can be real for everyone. - 3/8/2009   9:59:20 PM
  • NO-41_RAZZYS_PL
    29
    If our grandmothers, great grandmothers, gr8-gr8 grandmothers... and all that have gone on before us... could SEE this article today!!

    If the LEGACY of WOMEN could read these comments and see these web sites mentioned here... see the men and women HONORING them... these trackers and scouts who forged ahead of us...

    Women who faced challenges, defeats and victories... and much MUCH more- those women who carved what paths they could for us-

    How their children, grand children, great grand children, gr8-gr8, and gr8-gr8-gr8... generations of daughters... have some BALANCE in the world- some rights they only dreamed of!!

    I come from a LONG linage of STRONG (mostly) women. I have FIVE daughters. These young women will forever be PROUD of the women who make up their past and present!!

    Grandma was a nurse- owned a main street restaurant- lost it when she fed anyone hungry during the Depression- owned a park concession stand- became the first woman cab driver in her town...

    We must PRESS ON to make it so... for ALL women... EVERYWHERE!! Let us make the dreams of our daughters realities!

    EXCELLENT article!! Thank you for sharing!!
    *´¨)
    ¸.·´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)
    (¸.·´ (¸.·´ *Annie - 3/8/2009   8:08:38 PM
  • 28
    I've placed on my spark "other goals" to read about inspirational woman for the last year. Sometimes it is a woman that has graced to cover of a fitness magazine, sometimes a female business executive, sometimes a world leader (good example: Gertrude Mongelli http://zoneofpeace.blogspot.com/200
    5/05/gertrude-mongella-first-presid
    ent-of.html
    ) It reminds me life is too short to sit in front of a TV and reheat what the corporations want us to build our bodies with. It doesn't take much to understand that without woman most holidays would stop, many man would flounder in disorganization and there wouldn't be the next generation being educated. Mark this one on your spark calendar now so you can celebrate with your girlfriends next year what we continue to achieve. - 3/8/2009   6:47:49 PM
  • 27
    Thanks for the information. We don't often hear about women's accomplishments. Never heard of Clara Zetkin! That is a name I will remember from now on. - 3/8/2009   5:25:10 PM
  • BBATES6
    26
    yeah for the power of woman!!! - 3/8/2009   5:10:37 PM
  • 25
    Having just lost a very important female relative I was very involved in what this article had to say - 3/8/2009   5:04:13 PM
  • MZKYMWASH
    24
    this is a great article to read on thanks a bunch. - 3/8/2009   5:00:46 PM
  • CHATTERDUCK
    23
    Thanks for the article... sadly, this is the FIRST TIME I've ever heard of International Women's Day :( - 3/8/2009   3:34:46 PM
  • 22
    Wonderful article and so timely for me to read prior to attending the 18th Annual Latina History Day in Los Angeles March 13 where I will be a speaker. The article made me realize that I am actually the pioneering woman in my family to reach some pretty cool personal as well as professional achievements. Having started a business in our basement that is now a multi-million dollar a year business causes me to pause and reflect that anything is possible if you have a dream and are willing to put in the work. If you want to be a butterfly you must be willing to give up being a caterpillar and ladies, we all have the ability to be butterflies. - 3/8/2009   3:23:26 PM
  • 21
    I love all the articles form girlology! They alwaysput me in a good mood and make me proud to be a woman!! :) Great partnership with Spark!! - 3/8/2009   2:41:35 PM
  • QWERTYZ13
    20
    I thought this was a lovely article, but we still need to keep in mind just how much farther we still need to GO! A first woman president, for one! And equal wages because men are STILL being paid more than we are on average for doing the same job. Here's to a future filled with more equality! - 3/8/2009   2:36:18 PM
  • 19
    My grandmother was so happy to finally get the vote that she never misssed going to vote. That is, until her last year or so (she was in a nursing home) when, somehow, there was a mix-up & she wasn't on the rolls. Poor Grandma cried and cried, it was SO important for her to vote! Think about that, all who are "to busy" or think their vote doesn't count.
    My first year of teaching (in 1969) got me some horrified looks from veteran teachers when I came to school in a pantsuit instead of a dress! Yes, we've come a long way! - 3/8/2009   2:29:38 PM
  • 18
    I love girlfriendology. The newsletter makes my day! :) - 3/8/2009   1:35:56 PM

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