How Your Genes Affect Your Jean Size

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By: , – Molly Galbraith
11/7/2013 6:00 AM   :  37 comments   :  35,108 Views

"I am just big-boned. Everyone in my family is big-boned."

"My Mom is heavy. My Dad is heavy. I'll never be anything but heavy."

"My sister has my Mom's lean body and I have my Dad's stocky body, so I will never be lean like her."
 
At one point or another, you've probably heard your friends or family members utter these phrases. Heck, you may have even said similar things yourself. 

So just how much of a role do genetics play in your body shape and size? If you have heavy parents, are you truly doomed to be heavy forever? When your parents are tall and lean, can you get away with eating more—without consequence? If your mom has wide hips, will shopping for jeans always be the bane of your existence?
 

First and foremost, yes, genes do play a significant role in your body type, shape and size. There are three generally accepted body types: ectomorph, mesomorph and endomorph. Below is a table listing general characteristics of each body type.

3 Main Body Types
Features Ectomorph Mesomorph Endomorph
Appearance Slender & lean Muscular & athletic Soft or chubby
Shoulders Lean & narrow Wide Narrow to medium
Body fat Low Varies Average to high
Bones Small Large Medium
Metabolism Very fast Medium to fast Slow
Waistline Straight Hourglass Large
Gender Men & women Mostly men Mostly women
Weight gain Difficult gainers Yes, if overeating Easily gain weight
 
In general, if you are thin, have long limbs and a long neck and low body fat levels, you are an ectomorph.

If you would describe yourself as an "athletic" build, and it's not hard for you to add body fat or muscle mass to your frame, you are a mesomorph. The mesomorphic body type is more common among men than women.

If you have a softer, less athletic build, with larger hips and thighs, and you tend to easily gain weight, you are an endomorph. The endomorphic body type is more common in women than men.
 
In addition to these three main body types, there are other general body shapes that describe how people carry or store body fat. You've probably heard people referring to themselves as "apple" shaped (tendency to gain weight in the midsection but have lean limbs), "pear" shaped (tendency to carry weight in the lower body) or a general "avocado" shape (a mix between an apple and a pear). Learn more about these three body shapes and their health risks here.  

While reading through the descriptions above, it's only natural to try and figure out which category you fit into. You might have found one that sounds exactly like you and your build. Or maybe it wasn't so clear which one you were. Very few people are one "pure" body type. Usually, we have some characteristics of one or more categories. I am a meso-ecto hybrid. I am very tall with an athletic build, broad shoulders and a narrow waistline, much like a mesomorph.  At the same time, I have very long limbs, long and thin fingers and a long neck; all ectomorphic characteristics.

Hybrid body types are quite common and if you found yourself nodding along to characteristics in two of the different categories, you are likely a hybrid.
So why does it matter?

Because so many of us bemoan our body shapes and try desperately to change them. But here's the truth about re-shaping your body. We are all born with a specific genetic makeup, a unique "code," (based on our parents, and our parent's parents, and their parent's parents) that we cannot control. We cannot change our body from an apple shape to a pear shape. We cannot control whether we gain muscle easily or if it takes every ounce of our effort to put on just a little bulk. We cannot control if our frame is small or our hips are wide. No matter what we do, our bodies will be built and shaped a certain way.

What we do have some control over, however, is how those genes express themselves.

Think of your genetic code as thousands of light switches on a wall. The individual light switches you have represent predispositions to certain physical characteristics from your height to your bone structure to your body fat levels. So what determines which lights flip on and which stay off? Your environment and lifestyle. Here are a few examples:
  • A young girl who comes from a tall family may be pre-disposed to being very tall, but if she experiences malnourishment during childhood, her growth can be stunted and she may grow up to be short or average height.
     
  • A man whose parents are both very lean (even without trying) may find himself carrying a significant amount of excess body fat if he spends many years making poor food choices, eating in excess and living a sedentary lifestyle.
     
  • A woman who is pear-shaped and tends to gain body fat in her hips, butt and thighs may never have "small" hips or a flat butt—no matter how hard she tries. But she can stick with a healthy diet and fitness program to reduce the amount of body fat that is stored in her lower body.
     
  • A man who comes from a long line of obese family members isn't necessarily destined to be obese himself, although he may have a "light switch" for easy fat storage. With diligence and hard work at watching his food intake and burning extra calories through exercise, he can keep weight gain at bay. But it may take him more work than someone else with different genes.
Then you have me and my naturally curvy figure. As I mentioned above, I have broad shoulders and a small waist. I also have large breasts, wide hips and a tendency to carry excess body fat. I'm more pear-shaped than apple shaped, so while my belly can be lean enough to show abdominal definition, my thighs still tend to be "thicker" even when my body fat levels are normal or low. Several members of my family have struggled (or currently struggle) with their weight, and I used to struggle with my weight as well. However, now that I know how to eat and exercise properly, I am able to control my level of leanness to some degree. This means that while I may struggle to get extremely lean, I am able to alter my lifestyle to avoid being overweight or obese.   

Truly, I have run the gamut from my highest to lowest weights, but my body is happiest somewhere in the middle; maintaining a healthy weight without going to extremes.

Genetics are a big determining factor in many of our physical characteristics, but that doesn't mean that we should give up and resign ourselves to a certain look because of our parents. However, it's important to know that you can't switch from one body type or shape to another. When you set body goals that go against your natural tendencies or "light switches," it can take extreme levels of work and diligence to get there or maintain that state. And when you make a choice to go against your natural tendencies, it can be a stressor to your body. Your body may never be comfortable there. Your body will take any chance it gets to revert to what feels more comfortable and natural.
 
For a pure ectomorph, gaining mass of any kind (fat or muscle) can be a full-time job requiring upwards of 4,000-5,000 calories a day, for years at a time. Someone with this body type would struggle to be a successful bodybuilder or linebacker.

On the other hand, a person with a mesomorphic body type has little chance of ever being slim and petite. If you're born with this body type, being a ballet dancer or jockey is probably not in the cards for you.

If you are born an endomorph, it will be much more difficult for you to get as lean as your ectomorph and mesomorph counterparts. You are unlikely to have a career as a bikini or runway model.

If you have more of an apple-shape, it will be difficult, if not nearly impossible, for you to attain visible "defined" abs.  As you lose body fat, your limbs will lean out first, and the fat on your stomach will be the very last to go, thanks to the shape you were born with.

These statements may feel like cold, hard truths, but they are not meant to demotivate you. These generalized statements are more for your own sanity: things to think about when you set your own weight-loss or body-shape goals. They are a glimpse of the reality you may face if your body goals are "extreme" for the genetic cards you were dealt. Yes, it's possible to totally transform your body in a lot of ways. But is it really worth it? Only you can decide.

I've learned from experience, that I don't want to go to those extremes. For me and my curvy figure, competing in figure competitions and trying to get extremely lean was a huge stressor on my body. In fact, the three times that I tried to achieve an extreme level of leanness when I prepped for different figure competitions, my body fought back. Hard. 
I may have looked extremely lean, but I felt awful.

I found myself exhausted, depleted, and without a period for months at a time. And once I resumed more normal eating and exercising patterns, my body weight and body fat levels exploded. I barely recognized my own body. After my third competition, I had caused my body so much stress that it broke down and I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) and adrenal dysfunction.

Since my diagnosis, I have learned to love and accept my curvy body, and I no longer try to force it to attain uncomfortable levels of leanness. I simply maintain a comfortable, but not extreme, level of leanness through proper eating and consistent, intelligent exercise. 
I've finally found a happy middle ground for my body. My weight fluctuates a bit depending on the season and my training, but this is where my health, performance, aesthetics and lifestyle intersect. 

The bottom line is that both genetics and your environment are key factors in your health and body shape, and you should never use your genes as a crutch or an excuse not to take care of yourself. Remember:

1. You cannot control your unique genetic makeup, your body type, your bone structure, your tendency to store fat in certain places vs. others or which "light switches" you are born with.

2. You do have some control over how your genes express themselves based on your lifestyle and how well you take care of yourself.

3. Because your lifestyle is what you have control over, focusing on that—as opposed to wallowing in misery over your "bad" genes—is what is most important.
 
So how exactly do you best take care of yourself?  These quick tips work for everyone, no matter what your body shape is (or what you hope it becomes):

1. Eat real food 90% of the time. This means whole, unprocessed food that is as close to its natural state as possible. A healthy amount of real food can do wonders for your body.

2. Lift heavy things 2-3 times a week. Strength training is important for many reasons, especially for women. Lift weights for joint health, stronger bones and better posture, as well as the maintenance of your muscle mass and overall confidence.

3. Walk for leisure often. Walking is a fantastic low-level exercise that can aid in recovery, improve your sleep and help you relax and de-stress. Getting more active each day can help you turn off genes that encourage you to store fat.

4. Find ways to manage your stress. Stress is an absolute killer, and if you don't mange yours properly, you are opening yourself up to a host of health issues. It's also been linked to increased fat storage in the body. Find ways to manage stress effectively, whether it's going for a walk, getting a massage, or having positive interactions with friends and family. In short, take a few minutes each week to take care of YOU.

5. Get quality sleep. Lack of sleep is another big health problem, because when we aren't sleeping well, our bodies aren't repairing the damage we did to ourselves during the day and we sure as heck aren't recovering from our workouts. Shoot for 7-9 hours a night in a cold, dark room, and do your best to hit the sack before 11 p.m.

6. Love yourself. Stop comparing your body to other people and start embracing your unique size and shape. Variety is the spice of life! Be grateful for all the things your body can do. Remember: You are more than a body or a number on a scale. 
 
What has been your experience with how your genes have affected your physical appearance? I'd love to read your comments below! 

About the Author
Molly Galbraith is a strength coach and co-owner of J&M Strength and Conditioning, a rapidly expanding, private gym in Lexington, Kentucky, for professional athletes and the general public alike. She is also co-founder of the wildly popular Girls Gone Strong group, a movement dedicated to changing the way women train. Her mission is to, ''Help women give themselves grace and compassion when it comes to their bodies, and to help them discover and accept what their best body looks like, with minimal time and effort.'' She has also been an expert contributor to magazines like Oxygen and Experience Life. No stranger to the gym herself, she has competed in both figure and powerlifting and her best lifts include a 275-lb. squat, a 165-lb. bench press, and a 341-lb. deadlift. You can find out more about Molly by visiting her website, and you can keep up with her latest adventures on Facebook and Twitter


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Comments

  • 37
    Thank you for the much needed reminder. - 10/27/2014   5:01:37 PM
  • 36
    I'm not a scientist or pro anything, just a gal. I've been saying this for several years now and no one believes me accept my husband who has studied this in college. I'll admit, it's depressing to have my thoughts confirmed but a relief at the same time. I wish more doctors knew/believed this, it would make life a lot less stressful. I'm a combo Endo-Meso. Even when I was thinner I wasn't thinner, if you know what I mean. My weight gain was due to hormones I was put on for many years, which now I'm off and trying to get the weight off. I accepted my build (not meaning fat amount) years ago, I wish others could too. - 9/24/2014   1:34:18 PM
  • 35
    "There are three generally accepted body types: ectomorph, mesomorph and endomorph."

    This is not science! This concept was debunked YEARS ago! While genetics most likely plays a part in your ability to gain and lose weight, the idea that there are body "types" is left over junk science from the age of Eugenics. - 7/3/2014   3:45:35 PM
  • SINGSHALALA
    34
    Thank you for this. It's a good perspective to have. - 4/26/2014   5:41:14 PM
  • NEWLIFENAT
    33
    Love the article. Just starting out on my journey again. Hopefully I will finally get off the weight roller coaster and find health. I love your curvy look by the way. - 12/11/2013   10:46:22 AM
  • IMH7751
    32
    Thank you for this article. After 10 months, I have lost 52 pounds, and am having trouble deciding when to stop losing and go into maintenance mode. I had a Microfit health assessment in July and another in November, and in the November reassessment, they told me that my body fat had dropped to 19.6, and I didn't need to lose any more weight. However, I tried to push on to lose more weight, hoping that the extra fat around my waist would go away. Then my dermatologist told me that losing more weight would not make that fat go away, and she advised me to stop losing weight. I think it is time to accept that this is my new ideal weight, about 15 pounds heavier than I was as a young woman. Every indicator on the Microfit assessment was in the excellent category, except BMI, which is only fair, but I think that is naturally high in me because I do have big, heavy bones, and I have done lots of strength training and cardio. It is hard to know what the right weight is for me at this age. But when I take into account all factors, including my new clothing size and the compliments that people bestow on me, my body type (Mesomorph, hourglass) and my energy level, then the weight where I am now seems about right. Thank you for pointing out that my 'perfect' weight is unique and I don't have to strive for some magic number that may not be realistic for me. - 11/20/2013   4:24:12 PM
  • JANIE65
    31
    Love the article it is so on. I am a yoga teacher who studied Ayurveda medicine and learned my body type was not what I thought. When I listen to my body I do great. I have not listened for a while but your article is making me take a 2nd look as to why my weight loss has stalled and I have developed Type 2 diabetes. This will make me re think my diet choices again. Thanks - 11/20/2013   10:13:48 AM
  • MORTONDH
    30
    HI Molly, I am a scientist who has spent the last 30 years studying gene-environment interplay and I want to congratulate you on the way you describe genetic contributions to body type and how gene expression is our bodies response to the environment (how we treat our bodies). Your description is right on. Our genes are listening to the environment and they respond accordingly. And yes, the idea of a nature-nurture dichotomy is dead. I have rarely read a popular article that gets the relationship between genes and the environment correct. Well done Molly this is not an easy concept to convey and you nailed it. Made my day reading this article.
    - 11/19/2013   12:59:31 PM
  • 29
    I love your posts Molly. I think I am a very slim endomorph, which its no wonder I have to eat like an angel and work out like the devil to lose. But I have, its hard but I have been patient. I was also wondering why I still have a little bit of belly fat even though I am pretty slim everywhere else. Dang body types. I think more weight training and more patience and I'll eventually have a flat stomach, but even if I don't, more weight training will make me strong and boost my resting metabolism. Thanks for a another great article. - 11/19/2013   11:44:06 AM
  • KCURLJOHNSTON
    28
    I am an ex-fitness trainer and was always very fit for my body type due to strength training. What surprised me was just HOW much harder it is to keep weight off during peri- & menopause (I went through it in my mid-40's). Previously I could stay below 120# easily with healthy exercise & diet. That's a good weight for someone 5'4". Now A similar diet with the same amount of strength & cardio doesn't get me much below 138#. I am still not as heavy and much more healthy overall but am following the aging trends of my family. As a trainer, I may have discounted this phenomenon with my older clients a bit too much. - 11/19/2013   11:26:22 AM
  • 77RICEGUY
    27
    Molly,
    I am glad to see that discussion of different body types is finally showing up again after decades of giving the same advice to all types of people. I have known for a very long time that my body does not behave like trainers think it does. I would very much like to see some research regarding the underlying differences in metabolism. I think that failure to recognize these underlying differences is a fatal flaw in much diet research. I also appreciate that you were willing to post pictures of yourself at different weights/shapes. For the record and from my male perspective, I think you clearly look best [and most attractive] in the middle. The chiseled "magazine look" is less appealing. - 11/19/2013   11:19:31 AM
  • 26
    Well I started life as an ecto - very scrawny, underweight kid, and up until my late 20's could drop a few lbs easily if I felt the need. But now that I'm in my 50's the weight comes on easier & comes off HARDER, nor does it stay off for any length of time. I may have some muscle under all this fat, but truth is my body fat % is waaaayyyyy to high, and the #1 thing I'd like to reduce. I mean, I'd be happy if the scale didn't hardly budge, if the body fat would come off! So I guess I'm an endo-ecto, or skinny-fat chick! I read your other article where you questioned if it was worth the extreme effort to maintain that buff, chiseled look, and it's helping me to admit that I'm not 20 anymore and maybe my "ideal weight" isn't going to be 125 lbs anymore. I haven't been able to get below 135 lbs in years, and my weight doesn't stay there. My NEW goal is to re-attain the 135 lb weight, and maintain that weight for, well, the rest of my life??? Yeah, that'd be cool!!! - 11/19/2013   10:11:19 AM
  • LAPRISECM
    25
    Great article! It was nice to read that even people who are slim still struggle day to day. I am 30-40 lbs overweight today. in 2008, I worked really hard to get down to 135 lbs (5'2" frame). I tried as hard as I could to keep it at 135 but same things as you.. my body fought back and said.. no, I don't like this.. I let it settle at 138 and was very happy with that weight. In the meantime, over the last few years, I have tried in vein to get back to that and no luck. I will keep trying though, but yes, My body fights EVERY step of the way. I carry my fat in my stomach and seem to be an Endomorph. Even when I got down to a size 8, I still had a bit of a pouch. Now that I'm 35... it's hard to just loose 2 lbs! But will keep carrying on... - 11/19/2013   9:10:37 AM
  • 24
    Thanks for this great article. I am a meso-endo: very tall (5' 10") with broad shoulders, a very lean upper body, and a strong tendency to store excess fat in my butt and thighs. This has been a major frustration my whole life, and I have alternated between giving up in despair and fighting hard to keep off the butt fat. I am only 4 lbs. away from the middle of my healthy BMI range, which is where I should probably be as someone with a medium to large skeleton, but I am still deeply unhappy with my butt and thighs and am worried that I will never like and accept my body even at my goal weight. I know I need to make peace with the reality of my genetic makeup, but so far I have not been able to get to that point. I am curious to know whether anyone has ever been able to eliminate saddle bags through diet and exercise. Mine have been with me for so long that I can actually feel structural changes under the skin, as if the tissue has permanently changed shape. I fear that I will never be able to make real progress there, but what are my options? Giving up sure isn't one of them. There are so many other important reasons to eat well and exercise that even if someone told me I would never be able to reduce my butt and thighs beyond where they are now, I would stay the course I've set for myself. Apologies for the ramble...I think your article hit a nerve!! - 11/17/2013   1:42:20 AM
  • 23
    At this time I'm getting use to an 88lb weight loss after being overweight since about 9 years old. That's a lot of years. Stomach fat is the main problem at this time. I try to eat according to the Healthy fats meal plan. I have large breast(since 5th or 6th grade 42 bra size back then)! I have flat behind. My legs have always been little and lean but they are SO much smaller now! My mother had bigger breast but overall she was a petite short woman. My daddy is tall and a mix I think. He takes care of himself and exercise as well at 73 years old a retired Air Force Sargent. I can tell why my breast is larger which used to dismay me until they went down below my 5th grade size lol! I'm just going to keep running my race to live long and strong and rejoice in all the changes that will continue to happen. I'm blessed no matter what with this weight loss and healthy life style. Thank you for sharing your story and this information with us. You ROCK! Blessings! - 11/9/2013   12:31:08 AM
  • SOAKEDGIRL
    22
    I don't know how many times I've told slim athletic-built trainers that my thighs bulk up with any hard training on them. They just shake their heads and say it's a myth, this article proves my point. Cookie cutter workouts don't work. - 11/8/2013   2:52:41 PM
  • 21
    Thank you for such a great article Molly. I have always thought of myself as an apple but since losing a lot of my excess weight through diet and exercise maybe I am normal. LOL Yeah the new normal for me. I love what I have become. An every day athlete! It only took 63 years for me to get here. You gotta love life! Thank you again! - 11/8/2013   10:56:57 AM
  • 20
    This is a great article. Even when I was thin, I never had a flat stomach. Add to that years of vocal training to produce good muscles for singing. Of course, they're covered by about 10" of fat. But I know I'll never be the lady in the bikini.

    As far as knowing my genetic background, I'm adopted. So I have to work with what I see in the mirror and hope for the best. - 11/8/2013   8:57:55 AM
  • CHERYLHURT
    19
    You look marvelous! - 11/8/2013   6:19:01 AM
  • 18
    molly this is hands down the best fitness article I ever read. you will help so many people with this. in my younger years I worked in shipping ,lived in the gym and ate healthy I was skinny with a little belly, now I can gain the muscles but be at peace with my belly . Thank you for showing us there is help for us all,. - 11/7/2013   7:38:27 PM
  • 17
    At first I didn't like what I read. But in the end I was very hopeful. I absolutely loved your honesty. So I will no longer strive to look like the person I wanted to look like so much longer. But instead be a healthier version of myself.

    What freedom it is to not be motivated to fit some kind of "norm". Thank you! - 11/7/2013   7:20:07 PM
  • 16
    A very good article. That is why I have always said it is 80% good nutrition 10% exercise and 10% genetics. - 11/7/2013   6:04:55 PM
  • 15
    I got my dad's 'bubble butt'. But, as the song goes... and I cannot lie! ;) My husband complains when I lose weight in my tush & breasts. Which, of course, are among the first to shrink when I work on losing weight. - 11/7/2013   4:25:11 PM
  • 14
    Aargh::: Why can't we pick which genes/ attributes we get from our parents? (hey, I'm kidding). Bit it's frustrating when I see I got my mother's hair (thin and fine) and my dad's physique (blocky and thick). Why couldn't it have been the other way around? Thanks for the frank assessment,

    Permanent Pear - 11/7/2013   3:48:15 PM
  • 13
    Great article. I feel and look great at 171.4 lbs. (I think anyway) I am satisfied with the way I look after how many years of being overweight. Anyway, thank you for the article. - 11/7/2013   3:21:15 PM
  • SPARKLES152
    12
    This is a fabulous article! I'm an 'apple' but unable to determine the body type, since I share with all of them. About 5'4" weigh 146 and want to get to 138. I went to 134 just 6 months ago but at age 70 everyone told me I look too old (wrinkles got worse)! I hold all my weight in my mid-section, plus have a lot of stress. I allowed myself to become sedentary and now it's a real chore to move around. Thanks for the positivity in your article. Incidentally, I like your body in the green bikini. - 11/7/2013   2:17:41 PM
  • 11
    I suffer from PCOS myself and adjusting to the results of it have been tough, but I'm working on it! Endomorph definitely for me! I "inherited" the genes from my Dad's side of the family. Thankfully no high blood pressure yet. - 11/7/2013   1:36:35 PM
  • 10
    I have striven in vain, to put the lie to the BMI charts, my whole life ... I'd wanted to be one of those 140-pound bangin' size 8's (or smaller-ish). I used to think I was large-framed; and some few people with an agenda would try to get my goat, insult me—and insinuate that I was "fat" weighing at only 140 pounds (35 years ago I'd had a peak weight of 226 pounds and kept weight off continuously only for the past 10 years). I also wanted to not have a cone-shaped torso. It had gotten me into trouble (I had been mistaken for actually being "strong"--and got pushed by instructors beyond my endurance/strength levels). Well, I am now a loose size 10, and very conically shaped. And about 120 pounds.

    Unfortunately, the BMI will always have merit for me.

    Now, I am also a hard gainer of muscle mass, for the first time in my life. Never could easily maintain muscle mass--always.

    [I was always an Endomorph-Ectomorph. This proves it.] - 11/7/2013   1:18:46 PM
  • BETTYMSG
    9
    Wow, your article made me feel better. When I was young people told me I had an hourglass figure(and even then I wasn't hapy with my figure). Some 50 years later after menopause-4 children-I no longer have that. So now will be happy to just keep my body at a healthy weight. - 11/7/2013   11:03:57 AM
  • BETTYMSG
    8
    Great article. It makes me realize at 5'2 and older years, I can no longer have the hourglass figure I had when young. Striving just to keep weight down at a healthy weight will be enough. - 11/7/2013   10:48:08 AM
  • 7
    Great article! I especially love the 6 things you CAN do. They are reasonable, pro-active, and will help an individual look and feel better about who they are. I'm definitely going to try and internalize this message. - 11/7/2013   10:39:07 AM
  • 6
    Great article. To me, you look much better (and sexier) at your "curvy" weight rather than your leaner competition look. Since I started to do more strength training than cardio, I have lost inches and got a lot more compliments about how good I look. The scale does not reflect this, but the mirror does! - 11/7/2013   10:06:18 AM
  • 5
    Thank you for putting things into perspective for me. Just what I needed to hear this morning. - 11/7/2013   9:07:13 AM
  • 4
    I think the aha moment came for me when I realized 2 of my daughters who are very athletic, wide shoulders but had flat stomaches and very little "fat" weighed in at 160 and 180 pounds. I had always struggled with the charts based on BMI that said we should be between 120 and 145 and looking at my girls realized that at that weight they would be skeletons. We are all different body types for sure. The number is a guideline but we have to use common sense. I have learned the same truths about eating healthy and not dieting. Congratulatiions for finding the size you are happy at. - 11/7/2013   9:05:19 AM
  • SPAYNE34
    3
    Talk about crushing my dreams! But it was the truth, and truth I needed to hear. - 11/7/2013   6:34:41 AM
  • LISSASLOSINIT
    2
    what a fantastic article. definitely saving and sharing this one. thank you for sharing your experiences! - 11/7/2013   5:58:40 AM
  • 1
    WOW! You made some very good points. I can't change my short legs or my tendency to have a bigger tummy than other body parts, but I can continue to work out and eat as well as I can. Thanks! - 11/7/2013   5:45:21 AM

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