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Better Than Store-Bought: Multi-Purpose Baking Mix

By: , – Bryn Mooth
9/20/2012 2:00 PM   :  34 comments   :  24,283 Views

Baking mix is an easy pantry staple—because it includes leavening and shortening, you can quickly transform the mix into pancakes, biscuits or quick breads by adding liquid (usually milk and/or eggs).
 
Did you know how simple it is to make your own? This Homemade Multi-Purpose Baking Mix incorporates whole-wheat flour and costs about the same (about 15 cents) per serving as the national brand. It has about 15% fewer calories and 70mg less sodium per serving, as well. It is sugar- and dairy-free.
 
Keep this Homemade Multi-Purpose Baking Mix in a plastic container or bag and refrigerate it up to 6 months. Substitute this in place of the name-brand store-bought baking mix. For example, it works well in a classic streusel-topped coffee cake.
 
Here's how to use your baking mix!
 
To make pancake batter: Stir together 2 cups baking mix with 1 cup milk and 2 large eggs.

To make biscuits: Stir together 2 1/4 cups baking mix and 2/3 cup milk; knead the mixture together. Drop spoonfuls on a baking sheet (brush with melted butter if desired) and bake in a preheated 450 degree oven for 12 to 15 minutes, until tops are golden.
 
4 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
4 1/2 cups white whole-wheat flour or whole-wheat flour (see Note)
1/3 cup baking powder
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 cups vegetable shortening (organic if you prefer)
 
Note: White whole-wheat flour and regular whole-wheat flour are nutritionally comparable: Both contain additional protein and fiber that comes from the bran and the germ of the wheat kernel. White whole-wheat flour is made from a variety of wheat that's lighter in color and milder in flavor than regular whole-wheat flour. The two can be used interchangeably. Use regular whole-wheat flour if you prefer a heartier, nuttier flavor and slightly denser texture.

In a very large bowl, combine the all-purpose flour, whole-wheat or white whole-wheat flour, baking powder, salt and cream of tartar. Use a wire whisk to very carefully incorporate the dry ingredients fully by gently sweeping the whisk along the inside of the bowl to the bottom, then up through the middle in a folding motion. Cut the shortening into chunks and add them to the flour mixture. Use your fingertips to knead the shortening into the dry ingredients, working the mixture as you get smaller and smaller clumps. Be sure to incorporate the flour at the bottom of the bowl. You'll end up with a fully incorporated mixture that resembles slightly damp sand.
 
Transfer the baking mix to a large plastic container or gallon-size zip-top plastic bag. Store the baking mix in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.
 
Serving Size: 12 cups, about 36 servings
 
 
What is your favorite use for baking mix? Use it in any of these recipes!


 
Bryn Mooth is extending her 20-year career in publishing as an independent journalist and copywriter. She shares seasonal recipes, kitchen techniques, healthy eating tips and food wisdom on her blog writes4food.com.


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Comments

  • 34
    I have made a mix similar to this for years. I always leave out the shortening(I never have enough room to store the mix in my fridge) and add liquid oil when I use it to make my biscuits or pancakes. It has saved me a lot of time and money over the years. - 4/7/2014   9:38:39 AM
  • CHERRYZMB60
    33
    I was looking at the recipes and I would make the brownies and of course the biscuits which I usually make from scratch - 3/12/2014   1:45:46 PM
  • 32
    Shorting and hard margarine is not good for you trans fat in it . - 11/9/2013   2:52:57 PM
  • 31
    This is cool! Thank you. I am going to make this. - 10/16/2013   12:03:11 PM
  • 30
    Jibbie49--- I have a copy of that book and LOVE it. Use it constantly. Thought of it as soon as I saw this! - 9/25/2013   10:32:58 AM
  • 29
    I will try this, leaving out the shortening, and substitute oil at time of use. I never use shortening.
    - 9/13/2013   3:53:04 PM
  • 28
    Baking powder already has the salt and cream of tarter in it so it's interesting to add more. I like the idea of leaving the shortening out and adding in oil when used. Then it doesn't need refrigeration. - 12/19/2012   12:58:29 AM
  • 27
    After reading some of the comments, I'm not sure if I want to try this! - 12/17/2012   10:46:30 AM
  • 26
    Love the white whole wheat info.....news to me. - 10/13/2012   9:23:48 AM
  • 25
    The bread in the picture looks wonderful; is there a recipe for it using the featured baking mix? - 10/7/2012   12:30:46 PM
  • 24
    Thanks for the recipes! I will definitely try!!!
    DH loves the Impossible Pumpkin Pie or Impossible Coconut Pie I make with Bisquick, so will try with this mix.
    Great for Impossible Quiche, also. - 10/5/2012   1:17:40 PM
  • 23
    It is not that hard to make pancakes from scratch. This mix has shortening which I avoid at all costs. for 9- 4 inch pancakes =1 cup half unbleached flour and whole wheat flour, 1 tsp baking powder,1 tblsp sugar, 1 tblsp ground flax seed (optional) 1 cup milk, 1 egg, 1tblsp canola oil. mix dry ingredients together, mix egg oil and milk add to dry ingredients. Bake on 350 griddle. - 10/5/2012   9:47:31 AM
  • 22
    I have used a recipe similar to this for years, trying to get some whole wheat into our diets, mine came from the "Penny Pincher's Cookbook" but I leave out the shortening and add liquid oil when using the mix. This gives it a longer shelf life and I can use whatever oil I want. I love using EVOO for making Biscuit Crust Pizza or I use canola when making waffles or pancakes. - 9/27/2012   4:38:10 PM
  • GIVEN2DREAM
    21
    Wow, I came back to this page to see if anyone answered my question about the recipe for the bread in the picture at the beginning of the article, only to find my comment has been removed. I guess that bread wasn't made using the baking mix and someone doesn't want to admit it. Thanks for the censorship SparkPeople! - 9/24/2012   9:28:11 PM
  • 20
    It is so handy to have mixes available. Thanks for suggesting a healthier alternative. This will be put to good use! - 9/24/2012   3:11:58 AM
  • 19
    Just an FYI for those that are interested. While Crisco's label claims to be "trans-fat free" it is in fact hydrogenated and all though the serving size says no trans-fats it still has it (especially because you are using 2 cups and not 2 TBS). Coconut oil would easily be able to be substituted like Dragonfly02 suggested.
    - 9/22/2012   5:13:24 PM
  • 18
    I can't wait to make this. Thanks for the recipe. - 9/22/2012   1:21:44 PM
  • 17
    This is great information!! Thanks so much for sharing!! Being a Spark member pays off again & again : ) - 9/22/2012   9:48:32 AM
  • 16
    I need the nutritional data Please - 9/22/2012   4:26:12 AM
  • ARUSHING2
    15
    Thank you for some great ideas. - 9/21/2012   2:00:57 PM
  • 14
    If I want to make a gluten-free option, would you suggest using a high-protein flour mix instead of the two flours suggested? My husband has celiac disease and I don't use gluten products anymore (much to my son's disappointment!). How much xantham gum would I need to add?
    - 9/21/2012   11:30:30 AM
  • BRYNWRITES4FOOD
    13
    Hi, Dragonfly02 -- I used Crisco, which is all-vegetable and has zero trans-fats; you could substitute organic shortening. I haven't used coconut oil, myself, but in my research for testing this recipe, I did find one version where the person used solid coconut oil. So I think that would be worth a shot. You could try half a batch to see how it performs when you make pancakes or biscuits. - 9/21/2012   10:27:03 AM
  • 12
    I like that it has less sodium and will give it a try. - 9/21/2012   10:20:30 AM
  • 2DIETORNOT2DIET
    11
    I do not use mixes not that hard to make any of this stuff on your own. - 9/21/2012   9:47:40 AM
  • 10
    JOYCRN - I realized that, but at least I can search around for a substitute! - 9/21/2012   8:35:35 AM
  • 9
    I'm wondering if you can substitute the shortening with expeller pressed coconut oil. It's a solid, like shortening, at room temperature. And the expeller pressed does not have any taste, if you're worried everything would taste like coconuts. Plus, it has NO TRANS FAT like shortening, something I stay away from. Yes, it is higher is overall fat, but coconut oil fat is a very healthy fat. - 9/21/2012   7:23:39 AM
  • 8
    Kristen, this recipe has hydrogenated oil , i.e. shortening, so it will have transfats too. The "heart smart" Bisquick has canola oil (though it does not contain whole grains and does have a few other ingredients we don't have in our cupboards). I have seen other recipes for baking mix, perhaps there are some made with oil? - 9/21/2012   5:49:40 AM
  • 7
    Great. Thank you. - 9/20/2012   9:15:30 PM
  • 6
    So trying this! I was craving pancakes last weekend, grabbed the box of Bisquick in the pantry and saw 2g of trans fat per serving on the label. Never using Bisquick again! - 9/20/2012   8:26:29 PM
  • 5
    I will try this thx! - 9/20/2012   8:09:32 PM
  • 4
    This Sounds Like A Great Idea! I Believe I'll Try This Myself. I've Wanted To Get Me Something Together To Use In Recipes To Make Them Healthier. Thank You For Sharing! - 9/20/2012   5:46:24 PM
  • 3
    For years when my five children were growing up, I used the Sunset Book "MAKE A MIX COOKERY" by Eliason and Harwood. They were two college educated Home advisers who had developed this great system to save time and money. I see that there are still copies of this wonderful book on Amazon(dot)com. There mixes recipes covered most everything you wanted to cook quick and easy. - 9/20/2012   5:42:38 PM
  • ONEATATIME3
    2
    Like it!! I will give it a try. seems okay to me. - 9/20/2012   3:30:38 PM

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